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Which planes are a "must"?

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Forum topic by jklingel posted 11-14-2017 06:43 AM 494 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jklingel

63 posts in 970 days


11-14-2017 06:43 AM

I have two planes that I got from my dad. One is a simple Stanley, about 8” long, and the other, which Dad got from his dad, was never used till I got it. I think it is a #8, probably 14” long. I have only used it a bit, but I love it already. I am never going to get heavily into woodworking, as in big furniture pieces, but will do general stuff; build a few small furniture pieces, maybe boxes for gifts, trim for my son’s house, etc. One project coming up is building a 12’ strip/plywood kayak and then an 18’ strip freighter canoe. My question is: Are there a few planes which I just gotta have, or should I just buy them as needed? And that is the problem: What am I gonna need? It seems a small block plane would be real handy, but there are so many planes I really don’t know WTH to buy. Thanks. john


14 replies so far

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Andre

1448 posts in 1619 days


#1 posted 11-14-2017 07:19 AM

The 14” probably a #5, to build a Kayak or Canoe the first plane you should have is a Low Angle block.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Greg

326 posts in 2686 days


#2 posted 11-14-2017 07:44 AM

Agreed on the Low angle block plane. It just cuts everything! It really depends on what you are building and which species and stock you are using/starting with. It also depends on how much milling capacity you have such as a router, drum sander, band saw, table saw etc. Heck, you may not even need a plane! In general, the larger the lumber you are working with, the larger the plane.

I’d also suggest getting to a woodworking show where you can try the planes made by Veritas or Lie-Neilson. The latter has a traveling show-Look for it on the interweb in a town near you. Also check out some Youtube videos of different block plane reviews and see what looks like it will work for you. You may want to also reach out to other jocks who have built strip canoes, and see what they recommend. Just search this site for canoe.

-- You don't have a custom made heirloom fly fishing Net? http://www.Sierra-Nets.com

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OSU55

1395 posts in 1802 days


#3 posted 11-14-2017 12:32 PM

The work will dictate the plane, though some do go overboard. Research building kayaks and canoes to see what others use. LA b!ock plane will work for the other stuff. I have a $35 modern Stanley that works great but had to be tuned up. I have more e,xpensive ones as well that work. The 8 in may be a #3 bench plane which will do some of the work. Proper tune up and sharpening are the most important.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1425 posts in 1200 days


#4 posted 11-14-2017 01:20 PM

What OSU55 didn’t say is that he has several blog entries on LJ about tuning and sharpening hand planes you might want to check out. Just click on the blog link next to his name ^

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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jonah

1377 posts in 3112 days


#5 posted 11-14-2017 03:41 PM

The 8” plane you have is likely some sort of block plane, and the 14” one is probably a #5. The #5 is called a jack plane, which is an appropriate name since it can do a bit of everything. It can be tuned to smooth boards, to aggressively remove stock, or to flatten boards in a pinch.

I would say that unless you are committing to milling material by hand, you really only need three or four planes:

- a block plane (preferably low angle, Stanley 60 1/2 or equivalent)
- a smoothing plane (#4 or #5 in a pinch)
- a shoulder plane (Stanley #92-93 or equivalent, for planing the shoulders or cheeks of tenons)

Other planes are optional. Be aware that you really need to invest in and build your skill in sharpening and tuning your planes, since that is the primary determinant of how useful the plane is in woodworking. Dull, poorly tuned planes are useless. Sharp, well tuned ones are incredibly useful.

Fortunately, there are a lot of resources on the internet to help you with that process.

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jklingel

63 posts in 970 days


#6 posted 11-14-2017 09:43 PM

Many thanks for the many replies. I will digest all this. I will surely check on youtube and read OSU’s blog. For massaging wood, I have a Milwaukee combo router, I built an Abram’s router table, have an 8” Jet jointer, a 15” Jet helical planer, and a PC hand-held belt sander. I’ve been sharpening with 100 grit to about 3 or 4,000 sandpaper and a Veritas guide; may bite the bullet and get diamond stones. It sounds like I better invest in a small, low angle block plane and a shoulder plane. I just checked and I have a 5 1/4 Stanley Bailey, and a #8 Stanley Bailey. john

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WayneC

13751 posts in 3910 days


#7 posted 11-14-2017 09:55 PM

It depends on what kind of work you do. You might use a plow plane for grooving in some situations or perhaps a router plane beyond what is mentioned above.

Consider making a shooting board to square the ends of the strips.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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BlasterStumps

370 posts in 252 days


#8 posted 11-14-2017 09:58 PM

What does the sole of the 5-1/4 Stanley look like, smooth or corrugated?


Many thanks for the many replies. I will digest all this. I will surely check on youtube and read OSU s blog. For massaging wood, I have a Milwaukee combo router, I built an Abram s router table, have an 8” Jet jointer, a 15” Jet helical planer, and a PC hand-held belt sander. I ve been sharpening with 100 grit to about 3 or 4,000 sandpaper and a Veritas guide; may bite the bullet and get diamond stones. It sounds like I better invest in a small, low angle block plane and a shoulder plane. I just checked and I have a 5 1/4 Stanley Bailey, and a #8 Stanley Bailey. john

- jklingel


View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18438 posts in 2496 days


#9 posted 11-14-2017 10:12 PM

They made both types of soles. The “c” model is a bit rare, though.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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jklingel

63 posts in 970 days


#10 posted 11-14-2017 10:23 PM

Shooting board; good idea. Thanks. The bottom of my 5 1/4 is smooth.

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gargey

851 posts in 588 days


#11 posted 11-14-2017 11:41 PM

My advice:

Don’t worry about these things until you actually have the space set up, and the wood, and the time to build those projects.

In other words, don’t buy the tools until its actually clear that you’re going to be using them.

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bandit571

18438 posts in 2496 days


#12 posted 11-15-2017 01:17 AM

Chuting Board:

Jumbo Jack plane….some 2×6

A cleat under to hook in the vise, a claet on the end to hold the part…

Easier for me to clamp the part, and have both hands on the plane.

Three pieces of scrap lumber, and a few screws.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View jklingel's profile

jklingel

63 posts in 970 days


#13 posted 11-15-2017 04:51 AM



My advice:

Don t worry about these things until you actually have the space set up, and the wood, and the time to build those projects.

In other words, don t buy the tools until its actually clear that you re going to be using them.

- gargey


Roger that. A sporting goods owner in town always said similar when he heard “I want to go mountain climbing, so sell me all the gear.” He’d say “First, walk as far as you can, and when you want to go farther but don’t have the gear, come back and buy some to get you farther. Repeat until you are at the top.” My only problem is not having this stuff nearby. Ordering takes too much time; yes, I am impatient. So, I try to compromise and get some tools that I will most likely need. I have already run into several small situations where I think a small plane would have been easier, faster, and nicer than what I did. I think a small block plane is in my future; will hold off on the shoulder one…. unless I see a sale…..Thanks. john

View jklingel's profile

jklingel

63 posts in 970 days


#14 posted 11-15-2017 04:59 AM

Bandit: Nice board; simple, effective.

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