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Forum topic by myxology posted 11-14-2017 01:08 AM 537 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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myxology

55 posts in 1053 days


11-14-2017 01:08 AM

Somewhere around 12 or 13 years ago my brother gave me this stack of what he called brazilian hardwood that was left over from a deck he had built for a client. I also used it to build a deck for my wedding. I still had several pieces left and have moved them with me twice; much to my wife’s protest. It has always lived outside in the elements and I’ve always thought it isn’t going to be usable but I wanted to try. I finally got an opportunity to take a piece and test it. Here are the results. I took a piece about 8”x2”x1” and sanded it to 220, put some cutting board oil on it and rubbed in some paste wax. It’s not as shiny as I was hoping but I really didn’t work it that much yet, so it could be that. You can still kind of feel the grain, but it looks really nice.

So, now the question…. Is this stuff really usable? Is there anything I should be worried about with this after 12 years outdoors? I mean, it’s probably not food safe, right? So no cutting boards? It’s never been treated that I know of.

Thoughts?


9 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8137 posts in 1299 days


#1 posted 11-14-2017 01:35 AM

Use it however you want.

As far as identification goes, need better pics

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

289 posts in 698 days


#2 posted 11-14-2017 02:41 AM

Most common wood species are food safe, but some exotics may be questionable. You need to determine exactly what it is, ask your brother if you can. If, in the process of cutting and sanding it you didn’t start sneezing or wheezing, it’s probably fine.

The only finish I use on cutting boards is mineral oil. Let it soak in, reapply. I normally use cherry, walnut or maple for cutting boards. Some sources report that wood cutting boards are safer than some other materials from a bacterial contamination standpoint—seems the wood discourages bacterial growth. I’ve used cherry cutting boards for years and never had any issues, though I do not put raw meat on them—usually just veggies, fruit, cheese, etc. Then wash them with soap and water after use.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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myxology

55 posts in 1053 days


#3 posted 11-14-2017 03:46 AM

Thanks for the feedback, re: food safe. I also was curious if I should expect anything odd, like problems with it gluing or being too brittle or something. I don’t have much experience with hardwood as it is, let alone something exotic like this.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

547 posts in 722 days


#4 posted 11-14-2017 04:15 AM

Looks like Ipe, which is commonly used for decking. Not sure it’d be any good for cutting board use but I would make a great frame for a mirror or photograph or any number of boxes. I personally like the distressed and weathered character shown there.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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pottz

2117 posts in 797 days


#5 posted 11-14-2017 10:07 PM



Looks like Ipe, which is commonly used for decking. Not sure it d be any good for cutting board use but I would make a great frame for a mirror or photograph or any number of boxes. I personally like the distressed and weathered character shown there.

- Ripper70

i think its ipe also,which is very heavy and very hard.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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myxology

55 posts in 1053 days


#6 posted 11-16-2017 10:06 PM

So, I heard back from my brother. He called it Mangaris, which I did a quick search for and it looks like that’s a brand name (see link 1) for balau (see link 2). It’s beautiful stuff. Can’t wait to use it in a project or 2 or 4. :) Thanks for all your feedback. I thought you might like to know what the verdict was.

mangaris
http://tataenterprises.net/PRODUCT/mangarisdeck.html

balau
http://www.wood-database.com/balau/

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

547 posts in 722 days


#7 posted 11-16-2017 10:14 PM

Pictures when the project(s) are completed.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View pottz's profile

pottz

2117 posts in 797 days


#8 posted 11-17-2017 12:58 AM



So, I heard back from my brother. He called it Mangaris, which I did a quick search for and it looks like that s a brand name (see link 1) for balau (see link 2). It s beautiful stuff. Can t wait to use it in a project or 2 or 4. :) Thanks for all your feedback. I thought you might like to know what the verdict was.

mangaris
http://tataenterprises.net/PRODUCT/mangarisdeck.html

balau
http://www.wood-database.com/balau/

- myxology

yes very similar to ipe used for decks a lot.havnt worked with mangaris but if its like ipe it will give your bits and blades a work out.have fun with it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

49 posts in 588 days


#9 posted 11-17-2017 01:28 AM

Be careful with the dust,if its like Ipe it can cause some problems. I find Ipe extremely dusty,very fine sticky.

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