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12in. Jointer?

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Forum topic by alittleoff posted 11-13-2017 04:03 PM 433 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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alittleoff

434 posts in 1089 days


11-13-2017 04:03 PM

Found a grizzly G9860ZX 12 in jointer with spril cutter head an mobil base for 2500.00. It’s been used for 18 months and supposed to be in perfect shape. Cutter’s have never been rotated and said to be perfect condition. Is this a good machine to own or should I keep looking for an 8 in. I’d have to drive round trip about 400 miles to get it. What do you think?
Gerald


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9556 posts in 3461 days


#1 posted 11-13-2017 05:07 PM

If you have the money and want it, why not?
I don’t think you will find it easy to resell for
the same money though.

While 12” and wider jointers are useful to pros,
getting by with a smaller one isn’t a big deal.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5421 posts in 2626 days


#2 posted 11-13-2017 05:21 PM

It might be well worth it. Half off of retail.

I use an 8” jointer, an old Delta DJ-20, and have found it can surface 12” wide boards with a little creative engineering. By removing the guard and taking a few passes, you can surface most of the boards width.
Then with a stationary sled inside the planer you can fully surface the opposite side of the board. Finally flip the board over to remove the ledge.

It’s not much more work than than milling 8” boards. Most of the boards I use are 7-8” wide, so it works for me. If I used a lot of 10-12” wide boards it would be tempting.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3536 posts in 2122 days


#3 posted 11-13-2017 05:30 PM

I can’t give you advice on the piratically jointer. I know little about grizzly. I can say that wide jointers are very nice to have no matter if you a pro or not. So far I have had 4”, 10”, 12 and now 16’’ jointer. My only regret is not going wider sooner. I just like to get stuff done as easy as possible and try to avoid as much as I can being creative at work a rounds.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Andre's profile

Andre

1448 posts in 1619 days


#4 posted 11-13-2017 05:33 PM

I went from a 6” to a 12” Combo. machine, love the wide table but actually thinking about a 6” table top machine for smaller stuff? LOL! always seemed every board I had was 7” wide when I had the smaller machine and when I started to mill some of my own wood everything was 10” and even now have a few planks that are 13” ?
Nothing is perfect!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1121 posts in 1037 days


#5 posted 11-13-2017 05:44 PM

It’s a good deal. You can buy older machines that are heavier and better quality for less but the addition of the spiral cutter-head is where the greatest value is.
I have a 16” Buss jointer I’m restoring and I had a custom head made that cost as much as I paid for the whole machine.

Also, 3 sides left on the cutters means you will have a lot of life before you have to replace them, if ever. You might want to get a pack of extras from Grizzly though just in case one gets cracked.

Good luck.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4711 posts in 2306 days


#6 posted 11-13-2017 07:52 PM

I think you should skip it, that guy is out to fleece you. Tell me where it is and if it’s close enough I’ll personally visit the fellow and tell him to quit trying to rip folks off! :-)

Seriously, that is worth considering if you can figure out the logistics part. Moving a 1200# machine is no small task.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7625 posts in 2727 days


#7 posted 11-13-2017 08:04 PM


It might be well worth it. Half off of retail.

I use an 8” jointer, an old Delta DJ-20, and have found it can surface 12” wide boards with a little creative engineering. By removing the guard and taking a few passes, you can surface most of the boards width.
Then with a stationary sled inside the planer you can fully surface the opposite side of the board. Finally flip the board over to remove the ledge.

It s not much more work than than milling 8” boards. Most of the boards I use are 7-8” wide, so it works for me. If I used a lot of 10-12” wide boards it would be tempting.
- pintodeluxe

Ditto for me as well. My 8in meets all of my expectations. When doing as Pinto suggests, I tend to finish off with a #6 or #8 hand plane to get that very last 1/64in cut that is higher on the last cut. THEN I head to the planer.

That 12in sure looks tempting, but ONLY if you have a very large shop, IMO. Even with my 24×30 shop I have to be creative and point my jointer pointing outside my walk-in door, for when I am jointing very long boards.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1153 posts in 1611 days


#8 posted 11-13-2017 09:24 PM

I have a 12 inch jointer with straight knives and it’s as good as it gets.
I say a Bryd head is a down grade for a jointer. It makes more sense for a planer.
If you head is not parallel to the outfeed table what are you going to do? There’s no adjusting the knives.
Jointer knives are easy to set you just have to practice plus good Hss with get much sharper then carbide.
The list goes on.

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3536 posts in 2122 days


#9 posted 11-13-2017 09:47 PM

I have a 12 inch jointer with straight knives and it s as good as it gets.
I say a Bryd head is a down grade for a jointer. It makes more sense for a planer.
If you head is not parallel to the outfeed table what are you going to do? There s no adjusting the knives.
Jointer knives are easy to set you just have to practice plus good Hss with get much sharper then carbide.
The list goes on.

- Aj2

Both my jointer tables can be adjusted to be parallel to the cutter head. That the first step in setting up my jointer. It also easy enough to adjust out feed table to the correct height for a Byrd type head.

That being said If I could only have one Byrd they head I would put in on the planer.

Disclaimer, I only have straight knives in my jointer/planer.

This works for setting the out feed table no mater the blade type.

http://woodworkerszone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Setting_jointer_outfeed_table

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

754 posts in 2896 days


#10 posted 11-14-2017 10:54 AM

If you can afford it, and you have room for it, buy it.
As mentioned above, there are ‘work arounds’ for wide material on a narrow jointer, but as AG mentioned above, it’s a lot more enjoyable/efficient to simply joint a wide board rather than screwing around with a wide board/narrow jointer scenario.
As for the type of head…spiral vs. straight HSS knives. There is no debate in my experience.
I’ve got 2 16” jointers in the shop. One with a Byrd head, the other with a Tersa head with HSS knives. The carbide inserts will outshine straight HSS knives in almost every manner. The only saving grace for the Tersa head is the super quick change out of the reversible blades….less than 5 minutes on a 4 knife head. If it was a standard straight HSS knife scenario, I would have replaced it years ago.
The Byrd head is about 6-7 years old now, and still has never had a full insert change out, and it runs hard anywhere from 2 to 4 hours a day, everyday.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

636 posts in 1032 days


#11 posted 11-14-2017 11:00 AM


I think you should skip it, that guy is out to fleece you. Tell me where it is and if it s close enough I ll personally visit the fellow and tell him to quit trying to rip folks off! :-)

- Fred Hargis

and take it off his hands and show him how to sell it rightly, i presume? :)

hope we get some pics of the purchase.
i think that tells my opinion.

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