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Help needed on my first air compressor + HVLP spray gun setup.

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 11-13-2017 12:23 PM 908 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

240 posts in 473 days


11-13-2017 12:23 PM

I recently picked up a new Husky 60 gallon air compressor. It’s primarily use will be providing the necessary air for a spray gun. This is my first HVLP setup and my first big compressor. I was just hoping to get some advice on getting everything setup and running. I should note that I have a small production cabinet and furniture shop, and will be using this setup to spray paints, primers, water based poly and lacquer.

For starters, I have a dedicated paint room, and being that I bought this Husky 60 gallon compressor for the sole purpose of running a spray gun, I could either have the compressor in the paint room, or just outside of the paint room. Either way, a 25ft hose would be plenty long to get around the room. My first question is, should I run a short air line into the paint room or just use a rubber hose connected directly to the compressor? I would think that the benefits of having a line, (which will be black pipe), would be that I set them up in such a way to help not get water in the spray gun/finish as I could tilt the line towards the compressor, and have it go into a shape like the letter (M) on the wall inside the paint room with a drain cock at the bottom of each lower point. All of which would help with condensation in the final finish.


9 replies so far

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SweetTea

240 posts in 473 days


#1 posted 11-13-2017 12:25 PM

My second question is how expensive do I need to go for a decent filter and regulator? I have seen that the prices vary from around $35 on up to several hundred. Can any one suggest a good filter and regulator (either together or separate) under $150?

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JRsgarage

214 posts in 322 days


#2 posted 11-13-2017 01:26 PM

we used to run moisture, oil filters from SMC on couple of our compressors. they held up well but expect to replace them on schedule intervals if used heavily.

-- Two is One, One is None

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SweetTea

240 posts in 473 days


#3 posted 11-13-2017 02:24 PM

Would the Devilbiss Finishline model HAF 580 filter be a good one to use for this purpose? It seems to run around $80. Then I could pick up a slightly cheaper regulator from Home Depot. I think their regulators at my local store run around $30.

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CharlesNeil

2107 posts in 3683 days


#4 posted 11-13-2017 02:33 PM

Do not use black iron or even galvanized pipe.. it will rust inside and you will have debris in the line..
This was a hard learned lesson… had one little nipple of galvanized.. spent a month tracking down the “in line Trash”.
there are alot of new air line products.. I use copper and any fittings are brass .. not cheap but the alternative is worse

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SweetTea

240 posts in 473 days


#5 posted 11-13-2017 02:44 PM



Do not use black iron or even galvanized pipe.. it will rust inside and you will have debris in the line..
This was a hard learned lesson… had one little nipple of galvanized.. spent a month tracking down the “in line Trash”.
there are alot of new air line products.. I use copper and any fittings are brass .. not cheap but the alternative is worse

- CharlesNeil

Would the plastic type products be better? I thought about Pex, can’t afford copper. Also considering the RapidAir 1/2” system. Would I lose the benefits of using metal using the RapidAir 1/2” system or Pex? I read that if you use steel or iron, the metal will help cool the compressed air inside the lines and thus, reduce the amount of moisture in the lines.

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Lazyman

1425 posts in 1200 days


#6 posted 11-13-2017 03:00 PM

Maxline kits (like this) is probably cheaper than doing it yourself out of steel or copper pipe. By the time you buy all of the pipe and fittings you are probably getting close to the same cost. Using Home Depot prices, the pipe averages $1.50/foot just for steel pipe in 10’ lengths and probably more to get shorter pieces or to have custom lengths threaded and that doesn’t include the fittings and valves. The kit I linked to above is $1.60/foot including at least some of the fittings.

Note: I don’t have any experience with Maxline but it seems to get good reviews on Amazon at least.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SweetTea

240 posts in 473 days


#7 posted 11-13-2017 03:13 PM



Maxline kits (like this) is probably cheaper than doing it yourself out of steel or copper pipe. By the time you buy all of the pipe and fittings you are probably getting close to the same cost. Using Home Depot prices, the pipe averages $1.50/foot just for steel pipe in 10 lengths and probably more to get shorter pieces or to have custom lengths threaded and that doesn t include the fittings and valves. The kit I linked to above is $1.60/foot including at least some of the fittings.

Note: I don t have any experience with Maxline but it seems to get good reviews on Amazon at least.

- Lazyman

Well like I stated in my first post, I can place the air compressor in my paint room, or right next to it, and just use a 25ft air hose directly to my gun. I just wasn’t sure if it would be better, from a moisture perspective, to run the air through some lines before my paint gun. If I could just hook my regulator and filter onto the air compressor itself, and run a short 25ft hose to my paint gun, that would definitely be cheaper and easier, just wasn’t sure if that was recommended.

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OSU55

1395 posts in 1802 days


#8 posted 11-13-2017 04:36 PM

I have not had any issues with moisture just using the compressor mounted regulator with a small cheap separator, and an inline disposable filter. I use a 25ft 1/4” light hose, only used for spraying, with the filter 1st, then the hose and regulator/gun. I have sprayed qiute a few larger projects (dining tables, large cabints/shelves, etc). Not a production shop with all day spraying, but have sprayed several large projects with the same filter.

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pintodeluxe

5421 posts in 2626 days


#9 posted 11-13-2017 05:13 PM

Don’t count on the angle of hard piping to keep moisture out of the lines. Your filter will take care of that (along with draining the compressor after each use).

Using the most basic water trap at the compressor, I’ve never had water contamination with spraying a variety of finishes.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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