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To fill or not to fill?

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Forum topic by emart posted 11-13-2017 03:42 AM 264 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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emart

444 posts in 2441 days


11-13-2017 03:42 AM

I have some redwood slabs I plan on coating in epoxy bar coat. I’m toying with the idea of filling the cracks before pouring the resin but I’m not sure what product will work well with wood this thick. I have used regular fillers dyed black before but not on anything this big. The slabs are about 4-5 inches thick

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/


5 replies so far

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Lazyman

1425 posts in 1200 days


#1 posted 11-13-2017 04:03 AM

If you don’t fill, the bar finish will run into the cracks and you’ll have a dip there. You could just put some tape on the bottom and pour some clear epoxy in there. If you use 5 minute epoxy, I would do at least 2 pours to help keep bubbles out of it. With the 5 minute set time, it will thicken before the bubbles have time to come to the surface and pop.

After filling, you will want to sand it flat and make sure its level or doesn’t need a little more fill.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Rich

1865 posts in 402 days


#2 posted 11-13-2017 04:33 AM

That volume of 5 minute epoxy is going to melt any plastic cup you mix it in, and will be too hot to touch in a metal or paper container. I stay away from the stuff and use 30 minute for general work. I mixed about 40 grams of 5 minute in a solo cup and the cup collapsed from the heat generated when it started to cure. I’m sure that’s going to require far more than 40 grams.

For a void that size, I’d go West System 206 slow cure with the 404 filler. You can also add some pigment paste to give it some color if you want.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Lazyman

1425 posts in 1200 days


#3 posted 11-13-2017 02:32 PM

Never had that problem. I guess the plastic containers I use are more heat resistant or because of the multiple pours I am not mixing so much and it is not in the container long enough to be a problem. I agree that an epoxy with a slower cure is better for something this large.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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AZWoody

1121 posts in 1037 days


#4 posted 11-13-2017 05:47 PM

I would fill with epoxy because the way it looks, that crack will want to grow with time.
The epoxy will help keep it together.

Or, you could use some other decorative matrix to fill it and use cyanoacrylate or “super glue” to bind it all together.

When I use epoxy, I use a drop or 2 of trans-tine dye in the mix to help it to match, or to offer a contrast.

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emart

444 posts in 2441 days


#5 posted 11-15-2017 05:52 AM



I would fill with epoxy because the way it looks, that crack will want to grow with time.
The epoxy will help keep it together.

Or, you could use some other decorative matrix to fill it and use cyanoacrylate or “super glue” to bind it all together.

When I use epoxy, I use a drop or 2 of trans-tine dye in the mix to help it to match, or to offer a contrast.

- AZWoody

It shouldnt crack more over time because the slab was broken in three places and glued back together with dowels. I’m debating on using a filler that has been colored black so it’s less noticeable or to just fill it solid with resin.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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