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roughing gouge sharpening

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Forum topic by Karda posted 11-12-2017 03:31 AM 564 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


11-12-2017 03:31 AM

Hi, Im having problems sharpening properly. I can get a good edge and it works ok till I oops on the grinder and screw up the bevel and have to regrind. from the beginning I have been having trouble with the corners. One is high and one is low,I can’t get them even one hooks up the other down. what am I doing wrong thanks Mike


17 replies so far

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Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#1 posted 11-12-2017 03:49 AM

Are you using a jig or guide, or freehand sharpening?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#2 posted 11-12-2017 03:58 AM

I used to use a jig on my belt sander but still got the hooked corners, Now I am doing free hand on a grinder

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OSU55

1425 posts in 1827 days


#3 posted 11-12-2017 12:58 PM

You probably need to let the hi wing grind a little longer. All gouges have to be shaped by spending more or less time grinding in various areas. Once shaped then a pass or 2 ( or however many it takes) to smooth and blend the bevel. Never could get a jig to sharpen a spindle rougher correctly. I use a flat platform at the angle I want (45*) and grind by hand

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Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 11-12-2017 02:27 PM

+1 on spending more time on the corners. If you simply roll it from side to side, you pass the middle twice as much as the sides. In general I sharpen the corners first pulling away from the grinder as I go to the other side or at least use a much lighter touch as I quickly roll to the other side. After both sides are pretty much there, I then concentrate more on the middle to ensure the entire edge has the desired shape.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LeeMills

460 posts in 1139 days


#5 posted 11-12-2017 05:11 PM

You can make a little jig from a small piece of wood. Just cut a V into it (45 deg) and use a spring clamp to hold it to your rest. Just place the gouge in the V and rotate it.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 11-12-2017 05:20 PM

thanks I’ll do corner first kinda what I am doing to straighten it out never thought about the center getting 2x as much grinding as the sides I’ll watch out for that. are the corners even need. you don’t cut with the corners

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1567 days


#7 posted 11-12-2017 08:26 PM

It’s


thanks I ll do corner first kinda what I am doing to straighten it out never thought about the center getting 2x as much grinding as the sides I ll watch out for that. are the corners even need. you don t cut with the corners

- Karda


It’s like the old days doing doobies with 2 other people. The person in the middle always got higher…....... Jerry

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#8 posted 11-13-2017 01:08 AM

never did them but I know what you mean, I finally got the corner down and I can use it but the edge is wavy, need more practice

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a1Jim

116576 posts in 3415 days


#9 posted 11-13-2017 01:48 AM

This type of homemade jigs works very well for me and mind isn’t even as fancy as the one in the link.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/247802

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#10 posted 11-13-2017 02:13 AM

that is the jig I used when I used one, I am going to go back to it thanks for the reminder

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Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#11 posted 11-13-2017 03:51 AM



thanks I ll do corner first kinda what I am doing to straighten it out never thought about the center getting 2x as much grinding as the sides I ll watch out for that. are the corners even need. you don t cut with the corners

- Karda

I do use the corners of the roughing gouge. For example, when I’m moving from left to right, I will tip the tool so that it is sort sitting with its right edge on the tool rest, this makes a slightly more aggressive cut. This also allows you to use more of the edge so you don’t have to sharpen as often.

When I sharpen the roughing gouge I typically use a v-block on the toolrest as Leemills recommends. It helps to both keep the angle of the bevel consistent and also keeps the tool pointed straight at the wheel or sanding belt to make sure the edge does become skewed or wavy. The one like Jim recommends works well too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#12 posted 11-13-2017 04:28 AM

could you post a picture or drawing of the jig I can’t quite picture it sounds like a good idea

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

460 posts in 1139 days


#13 posted 11-13-2017 09:06 AM

This is the one for the Sorby. Just light pressure on the tool from the left hand keeps it in position while rotating the tool with the right hand.
You can make one out of wood by ripping a small piece at 45* then flipping one side over. CA to a base.
For steel or other, two sections of angle turned over and brought together will make the V.
3/4” thick is plenty thick, it doesn’t have to be as thick as the tool.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#14 posted 11-13-2017 02:18 PM

Homemade version. You can also use it to just keep tool square to the abbrassive by holding the tool against the side.

Edit: Mine was designed to slide in a dado in the homemade tool rest I made for my sander. You could also put a metal strip on the bottom and clamp it to the tool rest on your ginder.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#15 posted 11-13-2017 03:30 PM

You might also find this video useful. At about 5:45 into the video, they demonstrate how they recommend to fix and sharpen a roughing gouge, though you might want to watch the earlier part to see the 1-2-3 method explained. The whole video is a good demonstration for sharpening most of the different lathe tool profiles.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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