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Finish for wood kitchen sink?

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Forum topic by William Shelley posted 11-10-2017 09:07 PM 575 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


11-10-2017 09:07 PM

Hi all,

I’m planning out a wooden sink + countertop for a new kitchen that I’d like to make out of white oak. I’m going to be ebonizing the white oak with iron acetate solution, and then putting a clear coat of some kind over it. The sink and countertop will be all laminated up together as one unit, similar to the way concrete countertops + sinks are made in one pour.

I need a finish that can handle boiling water or grease being poured on it without harming the finish, e.g. it needs to survive without blistering or cracking.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective


22 replies so far

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#1 posted 11-10-2017 09:15 PM

Seal the wood with a nice thick layer of concrete.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#2 posted 11-10-2017 09:17 PM

I’m actually pretty interested in hearing what people have to say about this. That’s quite a request to ask of wood product. However, I am extremely intrigued by the idea of a wooden sink.

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William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


#3 posted 11-10-2017 09:19 PM



I m actually pretty interested in hearing what people have to say about this. That s quite a request to ask of wood product. However, I am extremely intrigued by the idea of a wooden sink.

- Gilley23

My thoughts are that if they can make boats out of white oak, then a sink should work too. The big issue is that a boat stays in water whereas a sink is subjected to a lot of wet/dry cycles.

A finish that both penetrates AND builds a good film may help to keep the wood dry though.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

1175 posts in 415 days


#4 posted 11-10-2017 09:21 PM

There are countertop epoxies that are good up to 500F. Seems to me the biggest problem is going to be the wood moving underneath it though. Don’t know of anything both flexible enough AND temperature resistant..,

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4688 posts in 1553 days


#5 posted 11-10-2017 09:36 PM

I too am very interested in this as I’m hoping to do something similar. I hope shipwright chimes in as he’s built wooden boats and bathtubs so can likely offer a pretty good solution.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3626 posts in 2142 days


#6 posted 11-10-2017 10:28 PM


Seal the wood with a nice thick layer of concrete.

- Gilley23

Teak wood sinks have been popular in the UK for over 40 years

http://www.sinksgallery.com/tips-wooden-sinks-and-baths

https://www.google.com/search?q=Wooden+sink&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiB8PK5h7XXAhVKHGMKHTPgCHUQsAQI6AE&biw=1536&bih=710

It’s really not such an off the wall ideal. Sometime you have to have an open mind.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

3626 posts in 2142 days


#7 posted 11-10-2017 10:34 PM

To the OP might find something of help in these pages.

https://www.google.com/search?q=finishes+for+wooden+sinks&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#8 posted 11-10-2017 11:06 PM

William wants it to survive boiling water and grease without cracking and blistering. Im really trying to be open minded im trying

-- Aj

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AlaskaGuy

3626 posts in 2142 days


#9 posted 11-10-2017 11:42 PM


William wants it to survive boiling water and grease without cracking and blistering. Im really trying to be open minded im trying

- Aj2

William has to have an open mind too. He must realize that you can’t always have what you want in this life. But there is no harm in trying.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

333 posts in 718 days


#10 posted 11-10-2017 11:58 PM

Just because you CAN make something out of wood, doesn’t mean you SHOULD.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10599 posts in 2213 days


#11 posted 11-11-2017 12:40 AM

Bars are abused to hell and back and most look halfway decent so maybe bar top epoxy. Minor grease spatter and occasional hot water aren’t going to hurt.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

954 posts in 424 days


#12 posted 11-11-2017 02:37 AM

Good luck with that. Stainless steel sinks get all scrathed up and dented and you want some freaking thin layer of film to be tougher?

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#13 posted 11-11-2017 03:11 PM

Okay so I’ve been doing a fair amount of research on this, and it’s actually something that I was considering in one of the bathrooms. For a kitchen sink, or even heavy use Countertops Where you think fire might be a concern , I’d consider ipe. Crap it’s got a fire rating similar to concrete. It’s extremely water and rot resistant, hard as Hell and looks, IMO, BEAUTIFUL when finished. The browns, orange and green hues with a nice grain pattern is one of my favourites.

Dang now I want a wooden kitchen sink.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


#14 posted 11-11-2017 03:41 PM

From my other research, urethanes can handle up to 450F, and there is some bar top epoxy coats that can handle 500F items being set on them. The highest temperature cooking oil is Avocado oil at 520F smoke point. Most are lower, in the 300-350f range.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4799 posts in 3793 days


#15 posted 11-11-2017 03:46 PM

Wooden sink? You’re more brave than I am.
Vacuum infused epoxy? Maybe….........
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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