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drill press table - avoiding rust

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Forum topic by ribaldplaner posted 11-10-2017 01:36 AM 439 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ribaldplaner

2 posts in 41 days


11-10-2017 01:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question drill press fence rust

Helllo!

I am a new woodworking/maker – just getting started. I’ve got a few projects under my belt and have been slowly adding tools to my shop/space. Just recently, I picked up a really nice used 15 1/2 Inch drill press (floorstanding model). It’s 40+ years old – but in really good shape. I’m really enjoying it.

How do I keep it in good shape? It’s in my garage, which I do have a dehumidifier in, but I am worried that the cast iron plate/leg will get rust on it?

Furthermore, if I build a wood fence/table for the drill press, will leaving wood resting on the cast iron table rust it out?

Any tips?

Thanks!

Tim


12 replies so far

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woodbutcherbynight

3634 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 11-10-2017 02:11 AM

I have a schedule of maintenance for such equipment in the shop. For me I lightly sand the cast iron tops and then apply paste wax and rub than in and leave it as is. On the rare occasion I see a rust spot develop repeat same before it gets too far. For the painted legs wipe them down with some car wax once in awhile and that should be enough.

Maintenance is an item I know we all hate to deal with. But even if only once a year you inspect equipment for belts, signs of wear on switches and clean everything down it will keep your equipment running without issues. Most of the time…................ Things do break but chance favors the prepared mind.

For any wood to cast iron contact I put oil based poly on the bottom, 2 -3 coats and let this dry and CURE for say 7 days then install. Again I know we all want to use it right now but letting the poly cure assures no issues later.

Every jig I have has the same treatment on the bottom.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10606 posts in 2213 days


#2 posted 11-10-2017 04:20 AM

I used wax for years but last time I sanded down my tops, I put on a coat of waterbase poly and it is working fantastically.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Bobthewoodbutcher

21 posts in 942 days


#3 posted 11-10-2017 04:44 AM

My Unisaw is about 30 years old and the table has zero rust. Almost the entire time it has been covered with a large sheet of heavy brown wrapping paper saturated with WD40. Recently I’ve started putting on a coat of Johnson’s Paste Wax occasionallly. (It helps that I’m in a low humidity area.)

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woodbutcherbynight

3634 posts in 2242 days


#4 posted 11-10-2017 04:48 AM



I used wax for years but last time I sanded down my tops, I put on a coat of waterbase poly and it is working fantastically.

- Rick_M

I am going to try this on my benchtop drill press.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Hackmeister's profile

Hackmeister

2 posts in 249 days


#5 posted 11-10-2017 05:58 AM

It will depend a lot on where you live, how much humidity and temp variation you have, and how much you climate control your shop. I’m in MN, but I heat the shop in the winter to about 60, and AC it in the summer to keep the humidity down (the shop is well insulated and one of the dogs lives in there), and I never have rust issues on any of my machines or tools. I have even left unfinished white oak on the table saw top for a month without a mark.

That said, in unheated and un-airconditioned shops I have worked in here, some have had problems with rust and corrosion. The worst were ones with wide swings in temperature throughout the day, where the tools get condensation on them because they stay colder than the air as it heats up early in the day. In those, we did need to keep wax or oil or something on the unpainted surfaces to protect them.

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

549 posts in 2973 days


#6 posted 11-10-2017 08:20 AM

I say don’t worry about it. Once you remove the old rust and wax the cast iron table real good, it will take some time for it to rust again even when covered with wood. I sold my last benchtop drill press with the wooden table and the buyer didn’t even consider to check the cast iron table that was underneath it. I don’t think you will get pitting with shop use and a dehumidifier. The most you should see is some light surface rust that is easy to remove whenever you get around to it, if ever.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1497 posts in 1221 days


#7 posted 11-10-2017 12:18 PM

I’ve seen the water based poly idea before but can’t bring myself to try it (don’t want to have to remove it if I don’t like it).

Just apply some paste wax periodically on any unprotected steel surfaces and you’ll be fine.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7653 posts in 2747 days


#8 posted 11-10-2017 12:23 PM

JPW applied with #0000 steel wool. PLUS, I now have a mini-split AC system in the shop that can be set to dehumidify that works great.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View ribaldplaner's profile

ribaldplaner

2 posts in 41 days


#9 posted 11-10-2017 05:21 PM

Wow – thanks for the replies.
Sounds like paste wax on the exposed iron will be enough.

Oil based poly on the base of the wooden table (multiple layers, allowed to cure) will also help if I decide to go that route.

Thanks all!!

Tim

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10606 posts in 2213 days


#10 posted 11-10-2017 05:42 PM


I ve seen the water based poly idea before but can t bring myself to try it (don t want to have to remove it if I don t like it).
- Lazyman

There is literally no difference with it on there (other than rust prevention), you wouldn’t know unless I told you. I put on one thin coat. One benefit is it gets down into any imperfections, pores, whatever, and provides permanent protection.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

57 posts in 976 days


#11 posted 11-10-2017 08:06 PM

Here’s a hell of a test.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667

On that note I use CRC3-36 due to some recommendation from fine woodworking or something somewhere and it works well in my Houston (it’s really humid here in case you were unaware) garage. Every couple of months or after some heavy use I reapply. Plus it’s fairly more readily available than the WD specialist in the test above.

View MinnesotaSteve's profile

MinnesotaSteve

33 posts in 725 days


#12 posted 11-10-2017 08:38 PM

Spray shellac… Just a light coat from a spray can.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/51551

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