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Setting up wood glue in cold garage

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Forum topic by JohnnyBoy1981 posted 11-09-2017 07:39 PM 471 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnnyBoy1981

209 posts in 275 days


11-09-2017 07:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: woodglue cold temperatures uninsulated garage

My detached is detached and uninsulated, so here in Nebraska it gets chilly. I’ve read a few articles on heating garages for woodworking, but installing a legit permenant heater isn’t in the budget. I use a portable BigBuddy propane heater.

My question is a bit more specific: my big holdup is using woodglue in colder temps. If I kept the space heater pointed at the glue and the glue up area, could the glue be kept warm enough to cure? The pine I’m using has been in the garage and is therefore cold. Would that negatively affect the adehesion of the glue to the wood?

-- Mistakes aren't mistakes if you still have all of your fingers!


9 replies so far

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Loren

9632 posts in 3486 days


#1 posted 11-09-2017 07:54 PM

Never tried one, but this might be worth a look.

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higtron

232 posts in 2515 days


#2 posted 11-09-2017 07:55 PM

Try an electric blanket, wrap or cover glued item in blanket for a few hours to overnight. In answer to your question I think if the glue doesn’t freeze it would probably set at some point what the strength of that union would be compared to a glue up in 60 deg. weather would be, I don’t know I’m sure someone has done a test of that very thing(Matthias Wandel!!!).

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#3 posted 11-09-2017 09:07 PM

For starters, PVA glue gets ruined if it freezes and thaws more than a couple of times. it’s pretty easy to just store the glue in your house and grab a bottle when you head to the shop.

Regarding the temperature of the wood, do some samples. Take two boards and glue them together overlapping by an inch or two. You want long grain to long grain. Let it cure at least 24 hours and then clamp it in a vise and knock one piece off with a hammer. If the wood tears, you’re good, but if it breaks cleanly along the glue line you have a problem.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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corelz125

314 posts in 814 days


#4 posted 11-09-2017 09:33 PM

I know on titebond it says in bold letters keep from freezing so i keep it inside and glue things up inside during the cold months.

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LesB

1360 posts in 3281 days


#5 posted 11-09-2017 09:47 PM

Titebond says not to use at temperatures above 50 degrees. Pretty simple.

Here is a quote from another forum on this subject:

“I received an excellent response in just 30 minutes. I thought I would share this information, as well as give a big thumbs-up to the customer service.

Titebond III will not chemically perform at or below its stated Chalk temperature of 47° F. If you reduce the temperature of the wood, glue or room below the chalking temperature, the glue does not coalesce (form a continuous film) on drying. This is evidenced by a dried film which is whiter than normal and looks “chalky.” Where the bond is formed at all, the resultant strength of a chalked glue joint is lower than normal and will always remain weak and often times will fail.

In regards to timeframe, the temperature really needs to be maintained for a minimum of 24 hours after glue up. At temperatures closer to the 47° F, you may want to wait 36 hours to be sure the glue has dried completely.”

-- Les B, Oregon

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alittleoff

447 posts in 1115 days


#6 posted 11-09-2017 10:01 PM

I’ve used tite bond 2 at or about 50 degrees and may have gotten down over night to 30 degrees I’m not sure, but the joints held and still are. I was glueing 2×4 pine lumber together for a table top and had no trouble at all. I was doing this for myself so it really didn’t matter. If wanted to make sure and was doing it for someone else I’d do like was said before I’d do a test. I personally think if it dont freeze it will hold. IMO
Gerald

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DS

2824 posts in 2259 days


#7 posted 11-09-2017 10:08 PM

There is a Titebond employee (chemist) who has commented on here in the past.
LJ GlueNerd
See his post here; http://lumberjocks.com/Midway/blog/112153

There is a toll free number on their website to receive qualified answers to questions like this.
They seemed more than eager to help out.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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JohnnyBoy1981

209 posts in 275 days


#8 posted 11-10-2017 01:41 AM

The glue bottles stay in the house in the winter; they don’t freeze.

However, since posting this question, I think I’ve figured out another way to do what I need to do.

Thanks.

-- Mistakes aren't mistakes if you still have all of your fingers!

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JohnnyBoy1981

209 posts in 275 days


#9 posted 11-10-2017 01:56 AM



Titebond says not to use at temperatures above 50 degrees. Pretty simple.

Here is a quote from another forum on this subject:

“I received an excellent response in just 30 minutes. I thought I would share this information, as well as give a big thumbs-up to the customer service.

Titebond III will not chemically perform at or below its stated Chalk temperature of 47° F. If you reduce the temperature of the wood, glue or room below the chalking temperature, the glue does not coalesce (form a continuous film) on drying. This is evidenced by a dried film which is whiter than normal and looks “chalky.” Where the bond is formed at all, the resultant strength of a chalked glue joint is lower than normal and will always remain weak and often times will fail.

In regards to timeframe, the temperature really needs to be maintained for a minimum of 24 hours after glue up. At temperatures closer to the 47° F, you may want to wait 36 hours to be sure the glue has dried completely.”

- LesB

Excellent! This is exactly what I was wondering! Thanks!

-- Mistakes aren't mistakes if you still have all of your fingers!

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