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Ripping on a table saw

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Forum topic by DIY1 posted 11-07-2017 11:21 AM 721 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DIY1

6 posts in 111 days


11-07-2017 11:21 AM

I have noticed while ripping a large 2X on my table saw the board ends seem to be tapered. Then have to run the boards on a jointer to get them true. Is there a better way to cut them on a table saw?


11 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

1585 posts in 3208 days


#1 posted 11-07-2017 11:24 AM

Sounds like your fence is not aligned parallel with the blade.

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cabmaker

1694 posts in 2718 days


#2 posted 11-07-2017 11:30 AM

Cant say if there is a better way…...what way are you doing it now ?

What are you considering to be a large 2X ?

Have you considerd jointing one edge first, then ripping ?

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

583 posts in 289 days


#3 posted 11-07-2017 11:36 AM

Are you using a RIDGID 4512 TS?

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1694 posts in 2718 days


#4 posted 11-07-2017 11:51 AM



Are you using a RIDGID 4512 TS?

- richardchaos

hahaha!!

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1326 posts in 829 days


#5 posted 11-07-2017 12:28 PM

DIY1,

Jonah may well be correct if the taper runs the full of the lumber. But since it only happens on larger 2x stock (I assume longer) and the taper can be removed at the jointer, the taper sounds as if it only occurs on the last 1’ – 2’ of the longer board. If the taper only occurs on the last length of the longer boards, then it could be that as there is less board to hold as the cut nears completion and the board is rotating into the blade.

Some ideas to control the longer board are to ensure that there is outfeed support. The outfeed support would allow for greater attention to keeping the board against the fence throughout the cut. If the outfeed support is a roller stand, then intentionally angling (slightly) the roller so that roller tends to rotate the infeed end of the board toward the fence could possible help. Of course, focusing attention on the edge and the board and the fence, working to keep these surfaces in firm contact throughout the cut is critical. Since this requires diverting attention away from hand placement as it relates to the blade, using a blade guard during these cuts could add a greater margin of safety.

Using a feather board set on the infeed side of the blade’s infeed edge could also be effective in keeping the stock in contact with fence throughout the cut.

View pontic's profile

pontic

558 posts in 518 days


#6 posted 11-07-2017 01:20 PM

If you have an outfeed roller support then cant the rollers into the fence slightly then the board will always roll into the fence giving less chance of tapering at the end.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2804 posts in 1390 days


#7 posted 11-07-2017 04:01 PM

I doubt its the saw but its always worth it to check alignment.

Few things to check regarding your technique:

1) the edge against the fence has to be jointed straight.
2) the edge against the fence must be kept against the fence all the way through the cut
3) use a riving knife or splitter
4) be sure you are using the correct blade and that is it sharp (lots of cutting errors are the result of dull blades and/or underpowered saws)
5) be sure to support the outfeed part of a long board.

You can employ aids such as a long auxilary fence and feather boards .

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Ripper70

806 posts in 818 days


#8 posted 11-07-2017 04:16 PM

Try using one of these to help accomplish suggestion #2 above.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5569 posts in 2722 days


#9 posted 11-07-2017 04:24 PM

2X as in framing lumber 2×4? Usually framing lumber has no straight edge. The good studs are bowed “only” 1/4.” It is a world of difference working with hardwood lumber that has been freshly jointed.

I’m not saying there isn’t a setup issue with the saw, but if the lumber is bowed we haven’t got a chance for a straight and even cut.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View jonah's profile

jonah

1585 posts in 3208 days


#10 posted 11-07-2017 05:15 PM

Even if the board were cupped or otherwise warped, it wouldn’t necessarily come out tapered. Tapered, to me, is 95% of the time due to the fence being misaligned.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5569 posts in 2722 days


#11 posted 11-07-2017 05:43 PM

Or the board moving away from the fence because it’s not straight lumber.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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