LumberJocks

What items to make and sell

  • Advertise with us

« back to Sweating for Bucks Through Woodworking forum

Forum topic by Kingchristo posted 11-06-2017 09:19 PM 1025 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Kingchristo's profile

Kingchristo

34 posts in 2041 days


11-06-2017 09:19 PM

Ive been looking through the site etsy.com and seen a few things that I make for myself and thought about making some and giving them a go selling on there. does anyone do this on here or recommend any good selling items.


18 replies so far

View poospleasures's profile

poospleasures

619 posts in 2297 days


#1 posted 11-07-2017 12:06 AM

Very hard to tell what to make to sell. If folks have been asking to make stuff for them at home maybe expand on what they ask for. I have been making all wood folding pocket knives for 14 or 15 years. They sell well for me. All are signed and numbered and I have several collectors who buy them. Have made 1043 to date and wow they are going to be valuable when I,m gone. LOL

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

View Kingchristo's profile

Kingchristo

34 posts in 2041 days


#2 posted 11-07-2017 12:54 AM

hahahha I have made a few knife handles and enjoyed making them. I really enjoy box making and would like to get into that

View HowardInToronto's profile

HowardInToronto

71 posts in 1515 days


#3 posted 11-08-2017 04:35 AM

It seems logical to ask “what should I make” but the better question to ask is “what market should I serve.”

In other words, think “people” not “products”

If you know a little about some markets and the people IN those markets, you can get a good idea of what they need or want and would be willing to spend their money on.

A good example is the person with the other reply – he serves knife collectors…

It’s easy/simple/quick to do. Look at your own interests and knowledge. Then expand that to the interests of the people around you – your family, friends and co-workers. Do some research into how your skills and knowledge might intersect with their needs and interests.

By all means, go to your favourite sites for research on the internet but try to figure out how you can add a marketing twist or flair that will set your output apart. Don’t produce a commodity. You can’t compete with Walmart or IKEA! It’s a quick race to the bottom. So produce something they can’t offer by adding your own spin on it.

Howard

View DS's profile

DS

2791 posts in 2233 days


#4 posted 11-09-2017 10:29 PM

Howard is a genius! Some real good advice there…

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View HowardInToronto's profile

HowardInToronto

71 posts in 1515 days


#5 posted 11-11-2017 05:13 AM

Thank you DS. Not quite a genius, but you can say that all day long! Howard

View pontic's profile

pontic

478 posts in 421 days


#6 posted 11-11-2017 02:32 PM

To expand on Howards ideas. People(market), projects(products) and price are what drive and retail market. Advertizing is just an accelerant. Take your People or market; I sell at the fair grounds from time to time during Christmas season. The people I sell to will only spend about $25max and the average is $20. So what can I make for 20bucks that will turn a profit ,pay for stall overhead and generate interest when someone sees someone walking around the grounds with it (so it has to be big but not to big). I came up with a design for a foot stool that included 1/2 blind dovetail joints and a simple cutout design. I use the best deal on hardwood I can get and get a few bft of good stuff walnut or cherry as “Commers” that sell for more so they stay in the stall longer. To make money I need to keep the cost of manufacture down to $4.60 a unit. I need to sell 32 of them to break even. I usually make enough so that when I add what I did not sell last year I have 60 of them. It’s a lot of work for about 400dollars a year.
I name my stall “Stool Samples”.
Some say I should stamp and sign them and get more money. I don’t think the people that go to the Christmas market will pay that much for any item.
I’m not making any this year sold all that I had thru my wife’s well armed women’s network.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View Kingchristo's profile

Kingchristo

34 posts in 2041 days


#7 posted 11-13-2017 09:28 PM

Some really good advice on here and I have been giving things more thought as to what I want to start to sell but I think I am coming close to making a decision. Thanks Guys again

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10471 posts in 2193 days


#8 posted 11-13-2017 10:12 PM

View harudy's profile

harudy

1 post in 11 days


#9 posted 11-14-2017 04:08 PM

Humidor boxes are a great bang for your buck. I know some people that have paid hundreds.

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

415 posts in 2757 days


#10 posted 11-14-2017 07:30 PM

My suggestion is that all the things that you see on Etsy, someone is already making.

Things to look at is how many of those items did they sell in the last year. Only costs 0.25 to post something, so if they don’t make a sell with it, it isn’t that much money out of pocket.

Another thing to look at is how many are making that particular product. Is the market saturated with people making them so that the only difference is the price?

The next question is how to make it your own. What can you do to make it such that it stands out or is different or better than what everyone else is doing?

Been doing craft shows full time for 15 years and am still learning.
Jim
These are a few of the questions I run through my head when designing new products. Other questions are:
How does it fit into my production flow? How much will it cost to ship it? What size box? What materials are needed to pack it? How does it fit into my design flow? How much does it cost to make? How much time does it take? Will I need any additional parts/supplies / tools to make this product? How can I personalize it?
(I try to personalize all of my products)

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2564 posts in 2735 days


#11 posted 11-14-2017 11:17 PM

I taught myself how to do double bevel inlay with my scroll saw. I started about nine years ago and have made and sold well over 2000 boxes with images or lettering inlaid into the hinged lids of small cedar boxes. My boxes cost me less than $4 in materials to make and about two hours each. I sell at farmers markets and street fairs and festivals here in west Texas. About twenty per year. I have also sold other items but these boxes are my best sellers so I focus on them. I push the idea that these boxes make good gifts. I have only seen one other person offering a product like this and that was just this year. Here is a photo of one of my displays.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2482 posts in 1790 days


#12 posted 11-15-2017 01:13 AM

My best seller by far has been post office door banks. Trick is finding the doors cheaply.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

869 posts in 404 days


#13 posted 11-15-2017 02:21 AM



Very hard to tell what to make to sell. If folks have been asking to make stuff for them at home maybe expand on what they ask for. I have been making all wood folding pocket knives for 14 or 15 years. They sell well for me. All are signed and numbered and I have several collectors who buy them. Have made 1043 to date and wow they are going to be valuable when I,m gone. LOL

- poospleasures


hahahha I have made a few knife handles and enjoyed making them. I really enjoy box making and would like to get into that

- Kingchristo


Bad move poospleasures. Now you got yourself a competitor

View bigblockyeti's profile (online now)

bigblockyeti

4650 posts in 1534 days


#14 posted 11-15-2017 03:37 AM

I’ve heard this advice on here somewhere and to a slight degree (temporarily) fell into the trap but when someone says “you should sell those” referencing something you made as a project or gift but it’s a different story when you ask them to put their money where their mouth is. Bottom line, make what you like but not so much you’ll be sitting on unsold inventory and figure out how to make it well and inexpensively so you can net a decent profit.

View Chashint's profile (online now)

Chashint

71 posts in 463 days


#15 posted 11-17-2017 04:14 AM



I ve heard this advice on here somewhere and to a slight degree (temporarily) fell into the trap but when someone says “you should sell those” referencing something you made as a project or gift but it s a different story when you ask them to put their money where their mouth is…..........
- bigblockyeti

So very true.

-- Regards, Charlie

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com