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Taller than 8' bookcases?

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Forum topic by opalko posted 11-06-2017 01:17 AM 537 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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opalko

148 posts in 3057 days


11-06-2017 01:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’ve built 3 sets of built-in bookcases for our house from 3/4” ply 4×8 sheets with dadoes, rabbets & shelf pins etc. Like these ones of Norm’s:

One was for wife’s craft room to hold yarn etc.

Today she suggested more bookcases in our living room, which has a vaulted ceiling going from 11’ to 8’.

It looked like a perfect place for some tall built-ins, and maybe one of those rolling ladders.

Then I realized I had no idea how to make them taller than 8’...?

What is the best way to do this? Would I need to stack sets of the units, say a 3’ one on top of a standard 8’ one? I really have never thought about how very tall units are constructed before now!


7 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1801 posts in 2338 days


#1 posted 11-06-2017 01:32 AM

You can stack them, design them so solid wood hides the plywood butt joints, buy 10’ long plywood (and use a solid base and crown to make up the difference) or do your own veneer on long panels. Lots of options.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

702 posts in 461 days


#2 posted 11-06-2017 01:53 AM

olpalko, looks like JAAune got the answer on the shelves but, I just wanted to say nice 8N in the avatar. Looks real nice. I’ve got one I need to bring inside and fix a dragging brake.
Mike

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Nubsnstubs

1296 posts in 1752 days


#3 posted 11-06-2017 03:12 AM

Make the bottom 44” enclosed behind doors. You could also stagger your openings where a shelf would support an upper standard. It’s doable without the exact same look that norm used. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Ripper70

1020 posts in 930 days


#4 posted 11-06-2017 04:52 AM

Perhaps approaching the project as a built-in rather than free standing bookcases.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Nubsnstubs

1296 posts in 1752 days


#5 posted 11-06-2017 01:36 PM


Make the bottom 44” enclosed behind doors. You could also stagger your openings where a shelf would support an upper standard. It s doable without the exact same look that norm used. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs


Below is what I had in mind when I posted my first reply. If it’s wall to wall, the only two standards that would have a seam would the the two on the ends. The seam could be covered with creative design instead of just following the plan of someone else. Unless you are trying to make a copy of what you already made, this is one way to use the standard products available and still have a good looking piece of wall decor.

.......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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opalko

148 posts in 3057 days


#6 posted 11-06-2017 02:29 PM

Thanks Jerry, though I am still confused. I’m not sure what you mean by “seams”. The way I make them is plywood standards with a poplar face frame that covers the exposed ply edges. And I’m still not clear on how to build up to 11’..? Would I just be stacking these on top of each other with no interconnection? I was thinking biscuits to align top & bottom pieces..

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Nubsnstubs

1296 posts in 1752 days


#7 posted 11-06-2017 04:07 PM

Opalko, the seams I mention are from the 8 foot standard length 96” and the 36” or any combination of sizes needed to make the 11 foot side. A tongue and groove butt joint, dowels, spline or biscuits would work to join the standard. You could hide that seam with the proper placement of a shelf, and no one other than you would know it’s there.
As you step down in size, do the same thing, or use a short standard to support a shelf that in turn supports a standard above. Just like the pictures I posted. I myself don’t like the bottom picture, but it’s an illustration of what could be done when you don’t have the length to do your project…...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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