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TS-Sunken Outfeed Table

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Forum topic by rance posted 02-16-2011 07:31 PM 1752 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rance

4245 posts in 2627 days


02-16-2011 07:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw outfeed table tablesaw jig

Folks,

In the shop where I work, for the longest time we had a cabinet saw with a typical outfeed table. About 2yrs ago, we switched to another cabinet saw. Up until about 3-4 months ago, we did not have an outfeed table on this new saw. I guess I’ve kinda got used to it. About 3-4 months ago, one of the other instructors built one for this new saw. Now I find that I would rather not have it there. For most of the stuff I saw(smaller work), I like to slide the workpiece off the back of the saw, then tilt it down to make it easier to grasp for the next step. I find that with the outfeed table there, it appears more difficult for me to do multiple processes to a piece. Am I the only one that feels this way?

I can see some of the benefits of having an outfeed table for large sheets so I’ve been looking for an alternative that fits both needs. I’m thinking maybe have the outfeed table 3” below the TS surface but maybe an outfeed roller on the far side. I find myself asking what YOUR purpose for your outfeed table is. I thought it served to keep from just pushing stock off the table onto the floor, and to support large sheets(which I don’t cut often).

In addition, with this sunken outfeed table, pieces could be slid off onto it and not interfere with new pieces being cut.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--


10 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#1 posted 02-16-2011 07:46 PM

I can see the advantage to your design when cutting small parts. As you said they will be pushed out of the way, without falling to the floor.

However, I can envision a lot of cuts, not just large sheets, where this arrangement would be a problem. Anytime you are ripping a board more than about 3 ft. in length, when you got near the end of the cut, the board wants to tilt off the back of the saw, lifting the board away from the blade before the cut is finished. A table like you suggest would do nothing to prevent this. Your outfeed roller solution would help in some cases, but not all… it would depend on the length of the board.

Still, I see this type of table as a valid option depending on what type of cutting you do most often.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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rance

4245 posts in 2627 days


#2 posted 02-16-2011 07:53 PM

Charlie, Maybe have the block shown, positioned just to the right of the blade to support those long boards and add a second block near the same edge but at the left corner?

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 2573 days


#3 posted 02-16-2011 07:55 PM

What about telescoping legs with locks and a scissor jack in the center? Raise it for the long stuff and lower it for the short cuts. This would give you the best of both worlds and each users preferred height. Rand

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#4 posted 02-16-2011 08:08 PM

Rance…here is an idea…. How about that support block riding on a track so that it could be slid forward or back depending on the length of board you were working with?

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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rance

4245 posts in 2627 days


#5 posted 02-16-2011 08:15 PM

@Charlie, That’s sorta the point, I don’t want it there for short stock, only for the long stuff, or for sheets. I’d rather not have to move anything. I guess other users could want it there though.

@Rand, A sissor jack sounds like more than 2 seconds worth of adjustment.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#6 posted 02-16-2011 08:28 PM

Yeah, I definitely see where you’re coming from. My point was just that there would be a lot of boards (depending on the type of work you do) that would be short enough to tilt before they reached a support at the far end of the table.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 2573 days


#7 posted 02-16-2011 09:03 PM

How about if you drill a hole through the inner leg and slot the outer on both sides and have a permanent steel pin. Drop down to your preferred height and raise it up to their preferred height. No adjustment, no measuring. You will only be moving this about 3-4 inches, right?

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2151 days


#8 posted 02-16-2011 09:41 PM

how about leaving it flush with the saw table but only making it 24”-30” deep? In mho the only need for the outfeed table is the lack of distance behind the blade, leading to a safety issues associated with holding stock while the motor runs down. I don’t like the “tip-off” method due to the impact of gravity on what were once square cut edges.

I built 30” extension, more than enough to support the material at the end of most cuts (if not I use a portable roller stand). And it still is small enough to navigate around. I think 24” would have been more than enough.

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 3254 days


#9 posted 02-17-2011 03:36 AM

I see two problems:

1. For the board to smoothly move up your far support, the curve should be concave, not convex. As you have it, the board will jam when it hits the far support.

2. If the far support is not centered on the board, it will definitely skew it to one side or the other, putting you in a bad kickback situation, not to mention throwing off the cut.

Looks unsafe to me, as does the practice of reaching across the blade to grab the tail of a piece as it slides off the table.

JMTCW

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View rance's profile

rance

4245 posts in 2627 days


#10 posted 02-18-2011 06:57 AM

Charlie, that’s the whole point, I want the short ones to tip so I can retrieve them. Whereas the long ones should be supported by the block.

LRWR, I like that idea better.

Gofor, The way I figure it, if the far tip is drooping down far enough to hit the bottom of the ramp, then it was inappropriately allowed to tip. If is not being tipped but it still hits the bottom of the ramp, then it is a limp board, which isn’t usable anyways.

As far as the far support, I believe it is a matter of proper positioning. It can be a safe operation.

Thank you all for your input and ideas.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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