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Legs/Base for Craftsman 12"x36" Wood Lathe

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Forum topic by Saucerito posted 11-05-2017 07:57 PM 1240 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Saucerito

16 posts in 710 days


11-05-2017 07:57 PM

Hi everyone,

I recently received a ~30 year old Craftsman 12”x36” wood lathe from a co-worker. The lathe has no base, so I’d like recommendations on a direction to go here. Being able to roll the lathe would be preferred. This lathe will be used for hobby purposes only. I plan to make some baseball bats, fungo bats (will use the full 36” for this), and maybe practice turning some bowls for fun.

I plan to measure the runout on the headstock, but the tailstock and headstock obviously do not line up when put together. Is this something that is adjustable?

Thanks, Will


6 replies so far

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Loren

9623 posts in 3483 days


#1 posted 11-05-2017 08:12 PM

Those tubular lathes are a peculiar design
for the reason you’ve noted. I’ve never owned
one but I thought you could pivot the tail stock
on the bar.

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MrUnix

5990 posts in 2035 days


#2 posted 11-06-2017 12:15 AM

I plan to measure the runout on the headstock, but the tailstock and headstock obviously do not line up when put together. Is this something that is adjustable?
- Saucerito

Yes. Adjustment procedures are described in the manual.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Saucerito

16 posts in 710 days


#3 posted 11-06-2017 02:24 AM

Found a manual online. I was able to align the tailstock pretty easily.

How about a base? Would a rolling wood base (with locking casters) be sturdy enough if I made shelves and put weight on them (dumbbells or something) or should I just go ahead and buy a steel base? If so, are there any recommended options out there?

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MrUnix

5990 posts in 2035 days


#4 posted 11-06-2017 02:44 AM

A stand can be as simple as a desktop to a fancy custom fabrication job. I have my Delta 10×36 on metal flared legs with casters and it works fine… but will try to walk around when roughing out a huge out of balance bowl blank. I have another (South Bend) sitting on an old vintage metal ‘tanker’ desk, although it’s not mobile. Got yet another (Unimat mini lathe) on a 2×10 sitting on top of a B&D Workmate. There really is no one best stand, and it’s entirely up to you and your circumstances (need for mobility, available space, what you have or can get to make it with, etc…).

For a super simple stand, here is one I found in an old vintage Delta catalog:

You will get as many recommendations for a particular stand as there are woodturnerr :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Saucerito

16 posts in 710 days


#5 posted 11-06-2017 05:57 PM

Thanks MrUnix. I’ve been looking around online and seeing that most wood lathe bases are actually wood. I think I can design one that will fit my needs for sturdiness, maneuverability, and storage.

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bandit571

18620 posts in 2519 days


#6 posted 11-06-2017 06:18 PM

Home made one works just as well..
.
Place plenty of weight on the bottom shelf…

You can mount the motor either behind the lathe, or..add a shelf below the lathe and sit the motor there.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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