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Blotching in Cherry driving me nuts....SOS PLEASE HELP!

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Forum topic by spike posted 1261 days ago 1211 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spike

66 posts in 2535 days


1261 days ago

I’m building a kitchen table for my parents and my mom wants it stained to match their kitchen cabinets.
I never stain any projects because I just use the natural beauty of the woods to enhance the look. Now that I have to stain this project it is driving me nuts with the blotching.
I purchased Minwax’s pre-stain conditioner. I’ve tried a variety of tests with how long to let the conditioner dry before applying. My test boards and times looked great. When i did the top, it looked good except for on specific board that had horrible blotching. I removed the stain by sanding it clean and reapplied the conditioner. Now the top looks even worse and because even more blotching has shown.
I’m going to use a stripper to clean the top tonight. Any suggestions as to how long to wait? Do you have better results with applying the stain to the board when the conditioner is a little wet?
It seems that every piece of wood on this project is reacting COMPLETELY different according to my test board. I feel like I’m treading water in the ocean with a 100 pound weight tied to my waist…please help with any advise.
Are there any tricks at all?? Or should I just use Bullseye shellac with a mix of denatured alcohol….if so, what ratios and dry times have been successful???

Thanks in advance,
Spike


11 replies so far

View childress's profile

childress

841 posts in 2147 days


#1 posted 1261 days ago

If you can wait to get the stuff, I would try Charles Neil's blotch control. It seems to be the best product out there. Wood conditioner or even thinned shellac can be hit and miss as you’re experiencing.

Be sure to watch the video, and good luck!

-- Childress Woodworks

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spike

66 posts in 2535 days


#2 posted 1261 days ago

Thanks childress – i just bought some after watching his youtube video. amazing stuff…..

View stnich's profile

stnich

107 posts in 1529 days


#3 posted 1261 days ago

Spike,
Just curious what kind of stain are you using? And what kind of wood are you trying to stain?

Stnich

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spike

66 posts in 2535 days


#4 posted 1261 days ago

Using Minwax oil-based early american stain on cherry.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2368 posts in 2347 days


#5 posted 1261 days ago

Do you have spray equipment?

Splotching is uneven absorption of stain or dye- If you spray it – then it no longer matters if one area is “Thirsty” compared to the others, the whole surface gets the same amount of stain and no more, rather than wiping the excess off the dry areas and having dark spots where the grain drank it up.

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

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childress

841 posts in 2147 days


#6 posted 1261 days ago

No problem, Charles is also a member here and is always willing to help out. I’m sure you can send him a PM with any other questions and more than likely get a helpful response.

Dr. Dirt, have you had success with solid cherry using this method? Even with spraying a stain, I’ve still had problems with botching (on alder, not cherry), albeit not as bad as compared to applying by hand. The problem I’ve had is that the “thirsty” areas will suck up all the color while the other areas don’t. Curious…

-- Childress Woodworks

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spike

66 posts in 2535 days


#7 posted 1261 days ago

I contacted Charles and already bought his preconditioner…it looks like it works amazing. i think my problems are solved thanks to Charles!

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2368 posts in 2347 days


#8 posted 1261 days ago

Childress – yes I redid a set of end tables this way that they wanted to match a new sofa table.

The key was that the film was LESS than any of the areas could absorb. So 100% absorption everywhere.
Even if a spot was thirsty – there simply wasn’t any more stain that could be absorbed.

Basically your misting in the stain like a toner. But I still also sealed the wood with shellac first.

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2379 days


#9 posted 1261 days ago

I used Charles Neils Blotch Control on a cherry crib and dresser and it turned out beautiful!

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112002 posts in 2182 days


#10 posted 1261 days ago

You have the right stuff Spike Charles Blotch control works great.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3659 posts in 2268 days


#11 posted 1261 days ago

One quick note about Charles Neil’s Blotch Control … avoid the temptation to sand with the finer grits before you apply it.

I had problems with the first project I used it on … just couldn’t get a good result. I sent Charles an email (he responds!), and figured out that the problem was that I had sanded to 400 grit, which made it hard for the blotch control to get enough material into the wood to do what it is supposed to do.

Charles suggested I sand to 220, which I did, and that fixed the problem. I have been happy as a clam with everything I have used it on since.

Which just proves … it helps to read the instructions!

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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