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Fixing chamfer gap...

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 11-05-2017 03:48 AM 534 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

856 posts in 687 days


11-05-2017 03:48 AM

Got ahead of myself and routered a chamfer without considering how this would give me a gap when I assembled the back to the sides. The gap is larger than I expect would work to try to sand/fill with a mix of glue and sawdust. Am hoping someone might have a suggestion on a good way to fix/cover or make into a “design element.” Thought of trying to cut a small wedge to glue in (and then sand etc to “blend”) but likely too small. Thanks.


18 replies so far

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TheFridge

8328 posts in 1325 days


#1 posted 11-05-2017 05:08 AM

Glue and sawdust?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 11-05-2017 05:22 AM

Epoxy putty. You can blend it to get close to the wood color. By letting it cure enough to be solid, but not completely hard, you’ll be able to use a chisel to trim it square, and then sand it flush after it hardens.

Finally, because the surface of the epoxy will be a solid color, some graining pens or pencils will blend it with the surrounding area.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Andre

1495 posts in 1645 days


#3 posted 11-05-2017 05:55 AM

Not sure of actual size but you can cut some pretty small wedges / shims with proper grain orientation that I think would look the best?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1053 days


#4 posted 11-05-2017 11:07 AM



Not sure of actual size but you can cut some pretty small wedges / shims with proper grain orientation that I think would look the best?

- Andre

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1053 days


#5 posted 11-05-2017 11:11 AM

OOps double post

-- Desert_Woodworker

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BB1

856 posts in 687 days


#6 posted 11-05-2017 01:04 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I think I’ll try to cut a piece to help “fill” the small gap and then go with some glue/sawdust as I haven’t worked with epoxy putty (and would have to order that). I have some of the dark Titebond glue which I’ve been using so that will hopefully help with blending to match.
Thank you again for every one who replied.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19802 posts in 2944 days


#7 posted 11-05-2017 01:32 PM

I would cut a wedge of the same wood and same grain direction and the exact width of that vertical board and make it over twice the size of the gap so you can handle it. Put some glue on the inside with a toothpick and then jam that wedge in there and let it dry for at least 4 hrs, cut off the excess with a Japanese saw and sand it

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#8 posted 11-05-2017 02:24 PM

BB1,

Rather than trying to fill in the void, the shoulder of the rabbet on the stile could be chamfered. Some careful layout and a sharp chisel could produce two chamfers that meet in the middle. With the number of chamfers already on the project, this option would likely leave you as the only one who will ever know this was a mistake.

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BB1

856 posts in 687 days


#9 posted 11-05-2017 02:33 PM

That is an option I have been considering as well. My chisel work is lacking, but was going to try using a handheld router on some scrap pieces to see if I could router all the way around the top and make it all looked “planned.”

And have a few other mistakes! One being a board that slipped out of my hand and a 6 inch long narrow piece split off the edge. Have glued that back in place (thankfully on the bottom side/back corner). After some sanding I hope to be the only one who notices (other than my husband who was helping me with the glue up)!!


BB1,

Rather than trying to fill in the void, the shoulder of the rabbet on the stile could be chamfered. Some careful layout and a sharp chisel could produce two chamfers that meet in the middle. With the number of chamfers already on the project, this option would likely leave you as the only one who will ever know this was a mistake.

- JBrow


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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#10 posted 11-05-2017 02:35 PM


BB1,

Rather than trying to fill in the void, the shoulder of the rabbet on the stile could be chamfered. Some careful layout and a sharp chisel could produce two chamfers that meet in the middle. With the number of chamfers already on the project, this option would likely leave you as the only one who will ever know this was a mistake.

- JBrow


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BB1

856 posts in 687 days


#11 posted 11-05-2017 02:51 PM

I was thinking more along the lines of a larger chamfer along the whole length.
Not sure though as that is really an “all in” with no turning back!

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#12 posted 11-05-2017 02:59 PM

*

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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BB1

856 posts in 687 days


#13 posted 11-05-2017 03:05 PM

That is what I was thinking for a chamfer fix. For perspective, this is the top (small bookcase and the person I’m making it for wants the “lip”around the top). My gaps are in the back corners.

- jbay


View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1702 posts in 1061 days


#14 posted 11-05-2017 03:14 PM

If it were me, I’d go the replace route.

Place a chisel on the end of an identical board and chip out a 45 deg. wedge, should only take one chop.

This can then be glued to the chamfer and sanded flush.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#15 posted 11-05-2017 04:01 PM

BB1,

If the bookcase top can be removed, then the re-rout with a wider chamfer would be possible. However, if the top is already fixed in place and cannot be removed, the bearing screw on the chamfer bit could bottom out on the top and thus not allow enough depth of cut to achieve the width needed.

jbay, that is what I had in mind, but with the drawing you posted, the remaining square shoulder might also need some chisel work. That I suppose would be a design decision.

As far as chisel work, a well-executed complimentary chamfer could be achieved with a paring block. The pairing block would be a piece of scrap whose end is cut to the angle of the chamfer. The pairing block would support the back of the chisel keeping the chisel at the proper chamfer angle. The pairing block could be clamped in position to remove progressively larger amounts of material, a little at a time, until the chamfers match. The direction of the wood grain would allow a sharp chisel to make clean shallow cuts.

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