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Forum topic by ChicksWithTools posted 11-03-2017 09:26 PM 378 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChicksWithTools

40 posts in 455 days


11-03-2017 09:26 PM

I’m building of these in my yoga studio:

So, my choices at Home Depot for 3/4” plywood are veneer of red oak, birch or maple. I need the loosest grain for traction purposes (as you can tell from the photo). Isn’t there a product that can be used to raise the grain before sanding with a rough grit sandpaper and sealing with eurathane?

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs


10 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1790 days


#1 posted 11-03-2017 09:49 PM

I don’t think you will be getting any better traction by raising the grain or using coarse sand paper before a coat of polyurethane. You might get a few slivers, but that’s about it. If you really need a lot of traction, then I think you will need to cover the plywood with some other material, or perhaps apply a finish like those made to give a good grip on flooring. Something as simple as a bit of fine sand in, or dusted on, the finish (while the pieces are laying flat, not mounted to the wall) could work.

I have never done the activity shown in the picture, and don’t plan on doing it any time soon, but thinking back to my days in physics class suggests to me that you will have a decent amount of foot pressure against the wall. It would depend on how far the strap that goes across the thighs is away from the wall.

Just to satisfy my curiosity, what is this exercise called and what are the benefits?

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2651 days


#2 posted 11-03-2017 10:02 PM

They sell a traction additive in most paint stores meant for stairs and porches. It is like a fine sand that you mix into your paint or topcoat. Then the finish is usually rolled on.

As a side note, the pull-out strength of screws in plywood is pretty poor. Better than MDF, but still not very good. I’m assuming you have appropriate framing structure behind the wall, and through-bolts with washers and nuts etc. This is the only way I’ll be able to sleep at night after seeing your picture.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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ChicksWithTools

40 posts in 455 days


#3 posted 11-03-2017 11:18 PM

Yeah I figured that picture might not be something guys on a woodworking board saw everyday. It not just that one exercise but many. The strapping system is used for assistance as most people can’t do a yoga pose with full flexibility, so the steps are used to so they can do it say…. half way. They are beneficial for people recovering from accidents or maybe cancer patients fighting fatigue.

This is a pre engineered kit, so structurally has been designed for this use. First step is to screw 2×4’s horizontally onto the existing wall, through the sheetrock and into the existing studs and counter sink the screws. The system came with a routing template to install metal plates counter sunk to be flush with the plywood. The metal plates screw onto each other from each side of the plywood and are secured from each side of the ply wood before the plywood is screwed to the horizontal stringers. The straps insert into the wall with a ball and socket type system. It’s secure. I’ve used them in other studios so I’m building one in mine. The other studio with this same system did tell me they built it with red oak and used the finishing method I described. Another woodworker suggested the product to raise the grain but could not remember the name of the product.

The traction additive sounds like a simple solution I may experiment with first before I commit to it on $50 per sheet wood.

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

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Loren

9631 posts in 3486 days


#4 posted 11-03-2017 11:25 PM

Painted shiplap sheathing ply would be grippy.
It can be bought with a rough sawn surface.

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ChicksWithTools

40 posts in 455 days


#5 posted 11-03-2017 11:30 PM

Real world application…

This

Verses this:

The top pic is much easier.

That’s probably enough yoga education that’s appropriate for a woodworking board.

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

View DS's profile

DS

2824 posts in 2258 days


#6 posted 11-03-2017 11:35 PM

I might think a smooth surface with a rubberized coating would function far better.
Just my 2 cents. FWIW

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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ChicksWithTools

40 posts in 455 days


#7 posted 11-03-2017 11:37 PM



I might think a smooth surface with a rubberized coating would function far better.
Just my 2 cents. FWIW

- DS

Yes I agree. Do you know of a product you could suggest for the coating?

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

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DS

2824 posts in 2258 days


#8 posted 11-03-2017 11:46 PM

Unfortunately, I haven’t had to use such a thing. I do know that several pullout mechanisms we buy from Rev-a-Shelf (for cabinets) have clear rubberized coatings on the shelves so things don’t slide as they move.

If I am in your shoes I am contacting my local paint store and asking about it. There are retail things like Plasti-dip, etc. but you are talking mucho $$$ for little spray cans. I would look to pick up a gallon of something that can be rolled on like house paint. (Sherwin Williams, Standard Brands, etc. whatever is in your market)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1523 posts in 3397 days


#9 posted 11-04-2017 12:44 AM

Marine stores have several choices for non-skid paints that are used on boats all the time.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View timmib's profile

timmib

10 posts in 603 days


#10 posted 11-04-2017 07:44 PM

There are roll/paint on finishes that are used on decks which comply with federal standards for slip resistance.

-- Kim, Chillicothe, MO

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