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New Shop Build Question1 (floor framing)

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Forum topic by Kilo19 posted 11-02-2017 04:39 PM 1931 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kilo19

56 posts in 61 days


11-02-2017 04:39 PM

Good morning all,

I want to try and document the process and flow of this build. I’ve been mulling around on this topic for a while and been reading lots but haven’t found an exact answer yet, If the flooring I’m thinking up in my head will be worth the trouble/time I’m putting in.

The design of this shop is going to be added on and based on my current building. (8×16) 2×6 treated joists sitting on concrete blocks on crushed rock. Blocks every 3/4 sqft (3/4’ in all directions, hope that makes sense). I have a drafting degree by trade and know the typical requirements and structural loads on residential requirements…etc. However this isn’t residential and don’t know where these load calculations and lumber sizes fall into.

I hand drew my crude layout of what I want my building to be, I’m a visual person, so forgive me if you type a large paragraph of good information, but I can’t understand it. (forgive me in advanced). My building size I’m shooting for is 22’x25’. My current building I’m building off of is 8’x16’ with a 4’ over hang on the roof on one side. I have a fence about 2’ away from that over hang, and want the building on that side to align with the fence. Long story, but want to use the building as a fence so to speak. Ok, so the front of the current building will act as part of one side, so on so forth.

I’m thinking of putting in concrete piers to set the floor system on. My floor system consists of the following. All material or most of the material used will be from old growth pine 2×6 true size lumber. I have my own way of weather treating, no lumber will touch ground or direct contact with water).

I’m thinking of having the floor joist doubled up on the perimeter, and the joists on the inside would be 2×6 @ 16” o.c. with hangers. I’ll break up the floor in half long ways, basically end up with two floors 11’x25’ ish and join the two in the middle. I think the distance between the piers on the 22’ side would be about 10/11’ ish.

My concern is that, that distance will be too long. I really don’t want to buy any beams to put under the flooring (trying to match the floor height with the existing building so height is a concern here). I can add more piers to support the span in the middle…Maybe a span of about 5’. 4 rows of piers 5’ apart short ways, and 3 rows of piers 12’ across longways.

Make sense, clear as mud. I’m pretty firm on wood floor as concrete is entirely out of the budget, and most/well all the work would be done by myself. I’ll looking into using mobile home anchors and simpson ties to attached the building to the concrete piers.

On the piers I’m thinking of digging down till I hit rock (about 2’ or so) and drop a sono tube and stick a couple of pieces of rebar that are tied in an attempt to use the rebar to attach to the floor system. (oh did I mention I’m an engineer, but just didn’t have the money to go to college and prove it ;) )

Thanks for the help, insight, and go easy plz.
Have a great one!

oh, and remembered the important part.
Tools: table saw x2, contractor grade, but an old craftsman 100 series. miter station, will have a band saw, lathe planer, and jointer. Nothing too big…biggest being the table saw or assembly table.

Walls I’m going for are 2×4, with either styrofoam insulation or reg batt (dont really know yet) roof will either be trusses, or stick, but want to use the space for storage. Pitch being a 3:12 or 4:12, no snow load here, but have winds sometimes. No tornados in 100 yrs here. Metal siding, or wood board and batten siding (shou sugi ban style) house wrap and plywood. Couple of windows/doors through out.

Done.

-- Justin


6 replies so far

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

91 posts in 41 days


#1 posted 11-22-2017 02:54 PM

hi.
I noticed that no one had replied, so I thought I’d give it a shot.
(I noticed that you said 3/4 SF on center, but I believe you meant every 3/4’, (4SF on center is 24” spacing).

I believe your spacing is inadequate. I think that you’d be better off sticking to conventional framing layout and materials:
2X8 floor joists, 16”OC, spanning not more than 8’ (just split the 22’ dimension into thirds)
so your 2 “floor panels” will actually be three floor panels.

you dont need a double rim joist at the perimeter, make sure you install a couple runs of blocking between joists at each floor span and glue/screw in the plywood subfloor (if you want OSB on the walls, that’s fine but stick with 3/4” plywood as the subfloor).

you could also move to 12” OC for the spacing of the floor joists.

lets get it figured out for you..

I’d double up on the floor framing members in the areas that will have the table saws.

-- measure twice, cut once.

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

532 posts in 214 days


#2 posted 11-27-2017 11:22 AM

Kilo19….. NO matter how smart you are no matter how thought out you think this will be no matter how clairvoyant you are in the planning of this… IT WILL HAVE TO CHANGE once you get going….

Also will the next piece of new equipment you bring into the shop to shoot to hell all your well layed out plans

ALSO put EVERYTHING ON WHEELS. BIGGER WHEELS the better

-- β€œIn a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View rwe2156's profile (online now)

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1316 days


#3 posted 11-27-2017 02:24 PM

I don’t think 2×6 joists are adequate even if your machines aren’t that heavy. 2×8’s and 2×10’s are pretty standard building practice, at least in my area.

I would consult a builder but when in doubt, my philosophy is always overbuild. So I’m thinking triple the x beams (or use an engineered beam). I would probably go 12” centers and 3/4 T&G subflooring.

You could also so 2 x beams and 16” centers but then you have more piers to build.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

56 posts in 61 days


#4 posted 11-27-2017 03:18 PM



I don t think 2×6 joists are adequate even if your machines aren t that heavy. 2×8 s and 2×10 s are pretty standard building practice, at least in my area.

I would consult a builder but when in doubt, my philosophy is always overbuild. So I m thinking triple the x beams (or use an engineered beam). I would probably go 12” centers and 3/4 T&G subflooring.

You could also so 2 x beams and 16” centers but then you have more piers to build.
- rwe2156

I was mentioning that to my brother in law that I was wondering about the 2×6s’ and he brought up a point. That the 2×6’s i have should have the strength of a 2×8 now a days. these 2×6’s are like 75/80+ yrs old. So i kinda have that going for me. Also its gonna be heck nailing/drilling into this stuff.

p.s. more piers for me isn’t a bad thing. I have solid rock about 12”-20” down, and plan on digging 8” tubes till i hit the top. So it’ll be on a “solid” foundation. No frost line here to worry about. (maybe an inch)

-- Justin

View Roy Turbett's profile

Roy Turbett

137 posts in 3415 days


#5 posted 11-27-2017 08:04 PM

Aside from the framing issues, you have an excellent opportunity to run conduit and dust collection under the floor before everything is enclosed. Speaking from experience, use long sweep elbows for dust collection at the building perimeter and standard 90 degree elbows at the machine hookups, especially the table saw. Its rare for anything to get stuck, but its much easier to retrieve a thin cut-off that gets stuck next to the machine than one that gets stuck further down the line underneath a cabinet or bench. I used PVC under the concrete floor of my shop and didn’t have to run a ground wire because it was already in contact with the ground. If you suspend your dust collection from the joists, you may want to ground it in several locations.

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

56 posts in 61 days


#6 posted 11-27-2017 08:13 PM



Aside from the framing issues, you have an excellent opportunity to run conduit and dust collection under the floor before everything is enclosed. Speaking from experience, use long sweep elbows for dust collection at the building perimeter and standard 90 degree elbows at the machine hookups, especially the table saw. Its rare for anything to get stuck, but its much easier to retrieve a thin cut-off that gets stuck next to the machine than one that gets stuck further down the line underneath a cabinet or bench. I used PVC under the concrete floor of my shop and didn t have to run a ground wire because it was already in contact with the ground. If you suspend your dust collection from the joists, you may want to ground it in several locations.

- Roy Turbett

Was def. thinking of that. I plan (hope) to write out my process and steps along the way. When that stage comes up I’ll file it away till then.

Thanks.

-- Justin

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