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Best way to hide plywood core on a beveled edge

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Forum topic by beekman001 posted 11-01-2017 07:02 PM 2381 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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beekman001

4 posts in 46 days


11-01-2017 07:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw modern

I’m a wardrobe out of 3/4” walnut faced plywood. Going through my plans I’m not sure how to hide the plywood core of the beveled edges on the front. Edge banding seems to be out of the question as the bevel on the front edge will be well over 1”.

The two options I’m considering are :

  • ripping thin strips of hardwood beveled at the same the same angle as the front edge and gluing those on after ripping the bevel on the face
  • Gluing on thicker strips of hardwood (~1 1/4”) and then ripping the bevel out of that

Are there any options I haven’t considered here?


15 replies so far

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

168 posts in 1473 days


#1 posted 11-01-2017 07:09 PM

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Loren

9635 posts in 3487 days


#2 posted 11-01-2017 07:35 PM

Color matching solid wood banding on
the outside edge may present challenges.
Walnut ply in particular tends to take
stains differently than solid walnut, I think
due to glue beneath the veneer inhibiting
stain penetration. That’s an issue I
recommend you plan for. Beveling the
plywood edge and applying a thin banding
to the bevel presents other challenges
as it will be difficult to clamp it and without
good pressure the glue line on the outside
edge may not look so good.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4766 posts in 2332 days


#3 posted 11-01-2017 07:43 PM

I think I would cut the bevel off, and glue on enough solid wood that the bevel could be cut into it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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beekman001

4 posts in 46 days


#4 posted 11-01-2017 07:58 PM

Firewood,

When I’m cutting the side-miters what options do I have for preventing tear-out on the edge banding? One of the big reasons my gut reaction was to go with thicker hardwood edging is that it would be more resistant to bad tear-out along the mitered corner.

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Loren

9635 posts in 3487 days


#5 posted 11-01-2017 09:07 PM

You can buy coiled wood edgebanding up to
3mm thick. Dimensioning strips down to 3mm
or thinner yourself would be difficult without
a thickness sander.

It may be difficult to buy in smaller amounts.

http://www.tapeease.com/thick.htm

View PPK's profile

PPK

870 posts in 649 days


#6 posted 11-01-2017 10:02 PM



I think I would cut the bevel off, and glue on enough solid wood that the bevel could be cut into it.

- Fred Hargis

I like your thinking. This seems like a good option. But I’d also look into edge banding. Its a lot easier.

-- Pete

View DS's profile

DS

2824 posts in 2260 days


#7 posted 11-01-2017 10:07 PM

Having been on the mass-production side of just such a wardrobe, I can say that we typically would have a solid face pre-molded in S4S then affixed to the assembled carcass.

Plywoods and solids would be selected from the same mill so as to ensure decent color match. (Volume purchase)
Even though it is Walnut, a Walnut stain can level out and forgive many mismatches as well.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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cabmaker

1626 posts in 2648 days


#8 posted 11-01-2017 10:53 PM

heres how i would do it,,,,,,,,, grizzly items,,,,,, C2013 and C2087

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6433 posts in 3207 days


#9 posted 11-02-2017 02:30 AM

For wood that is to be finished I use hardwood edging!
Sometimes even “T” shape hardwood edges routed and sanded to hide the joint!
For wood that will be painted I use filler or spackle.
Once the spackle is sanded it is smoother than the plywood and takes to painting!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4497 posts in 3083 days


#10 posted 11-02-2017 04:14 PM

I think glueing on a thicker piece of wood and then beveling that is the best way to go. I have never been happy with edge banding tapes. The adhesive doesn’t seem to stay stuck. Contact cement is much better as it has a stronger bond.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#11 posted 11-02-2017 04:49 PM

Back in the day before iron on edging and such my dad would cut the veneer off the plywood and then glue it back on the edges for a perfect match.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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beekman001

4 posts in 46 days


#12 posted 11-02-2017 07:26 PM



Back in the day before iron on edging and such my dad would cut the veneer off the plywood and then glue it back on the edges for a perfect match.

- AlaskaGuy

Any guidance on how? Not that I’ll be doing that for this project but I’d love to try.

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AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#13 posted 11-02-2017 07:38 PM

Back in the day before iron on edging and such my dad would cut the veneer off the plywood and then glue it back on the edges for a perfect match.

- AlaskaGuy

Any guidance on how? Not that I ll be doing that for this project but I d love to try.

- beekman001


Rip a piece of plywood the the width you need, pay attention to the grain direction. Now turn the rip on edge saw off the veneer on you table saw.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

711 posts in 2689 days


#14 posted 11-03-2017 03:17 AM

Here is an idea, it’s cherry plywood in the field, top and bottom trimmed in hardwood, and you can’t really see the beveled and metered joints in this picture but,... it’s plywood. perhaps you could turn the corner on your project and just hide the edge out of sight?

-- Ken

View DS's profile

DS

2824 posts in 2260 days


#15 posted 11-07-2017 09:53 PM

Something like this mid-century modern dresser, I suppose?

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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