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Forum topic by MrsN posted 11-01-2017 05:16 PM 875 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrsN

982 posts in 3362 days


11-01-2017 05:16 PM

Hi! I teach, among other things, woodshop at the high school level.
I have to create a few sub lesson plans, basically things kids can do that are shop related with out touching any tools or projects.
I would like to create a list of woodworking videos that I can develop some discussion questions around.
My budget is better spent on wood or tools than on videos for when I am out sick, and you would be amazed who won’t give a deal to teachers/schools, so I need free videos.
My question for you is who has “the best” free woodworking videos?


23 replies so far

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Blake Haskins

217 posts in 1074 days


#1 posted 11-01-2017 05:24 PM

maybe go to finewoodworking or popular woodworking youtube channels. I’m sure the kids don’t care to much for watching someone build a project.

-- make sure you subscribe to my channel- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRuWi7P7eIcNOckoxBI-ZRA

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hotbyte

989 posts in 2812 days


#2 posted 11-01-2017 05:25 PM

There was a topic here a while back on best YouTube woodworking channels. If this link works, it should be that topic – http://lumberjocks.com/topics/221457

Also, are you wanting hand or power tool oriented? Personally, I like Wood Whisperer, Wood by Wright

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jdh122

961 posts in 2654 days


#3 posted 11-01-2017 05:40 PM

The recent seasons of the Woodwright’s Shop are freely streamed on PBS. Not sure how high school students will react to his historic approach, but as far as I’m concerned there is nothing better.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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jmartel

7525 posts in 1986 days


#4 posted 11-01-2017 05:44 PM

Woodwhisperer is a good channel, Doucette and Wolfe for super fine furniture making (something for them to aspire to), Samurai Carpenter is a good one, Woodworking for Mere Mortals, Popular Woodworking puts out some good videos, Fine Woodworking has some good ones

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Rick_M

10621 posts in 2216 days


#5 posted 11-01-2017 06:05 PM

FYI, the url in your signature isn’t working.

I don’t know the situation so I can only make broad generalizations but I wouldn’t use videos at all. I would pick a project, put tools in their hands, and teach them how to make it. Kids watch enough TV/videos outside of school and get enough tests/discussion in school. When I was in school, we had a nicely equipped shop but had to buy our wood. We could buy it from the shop teacher or bring it in, but the school did not supply wood. So that is one way to offset costs. There is a book called Woodwork Visualized, that is basically a shop class in book form, that may or may not be helpful to you. It is hand tool centric, but nothing wrong with that.

But, opinion aside, there are a ton of free woodworking videos on Youtube. The Fine Woodworking and Popular Woodworking videos are excellent but may be too dry for kids. Frank Howarth makes woodworking videos with a touch of Pixar which might appeal to kids, mine like them. You might try Steve Ramsay, his videos are beginner oriented, his methods safe, and he is a personable guy. PBS has many episodes of The Woodwright’s Shop online which also emphasizes handtools and Roy is very entertaining. The New Yankee Workshop with Norm Abram is not hard to find for free online.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrsN

982 posts in 3362 days


#6 posted 11-01-2017 06:34 PM

Rick, don’t worry we do lots of projects and make stuff.
My administration wants us to have “emergency sub plans” in the office in case we get sick and can’t come in. There is insurance liability in having kids use tools without me present, so we need things to do that don’t involve tools.
I have had some substitutes that have zero clue about anything shop related so videos and articles are helpful.

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

3551 posts in 2958 days


#7 posted 11-01-2017 06:39 PM

what about layout and measuring exercises? When I was in my carpentry class in college (10ish years ago) we had to do worksheets on fractions and things to get us faster/better at doing conversions. Granted, your HS kids are probably way faster at that kind of thing than I am but it’s a thought and doesn’t require tools really. :)

-- Beka/Becky - aspiring jill of all trades, still learning to not read the directions.

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Rich

1978 posts in 426 days


#8 posted 11-01-2017 06:42 PM

Hello? Four replies already and no mention of our very own Charles Neil. His series on building a pie safe offers some of the best instruction that beginners and experienced woodworkers alike can get. Charles focuses heavily on wood movement and how to construct projects to account for it. The series is long, so you might want to assign only parts of it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

56 posts in 62 days


#9 posted 11-01-2017 06:48 PM

I’d say any of Paul Sellers Videos. He did start an online class of videos recently. They do tend to be a little long though. But I don’t mind.

-- Justin

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CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3707 days


#10 posted 11-01-2017 06:48 PM

I know that Charles Neil feller , it it comes to helping a kid or an animal, or any one , i can pretty much guarantee , he is all in… Pm me . or Charles.cnw@msn.com

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27068 posts in 2174 days


#11 posted 11-01-2017 06:49 PM

Contact Charles Neil and Stumpy Nubs. Both are members here, both do videos and both are just really nice people.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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ScottM

565 posts in 1983 days


#12 posted 11-01-2017 06:58 PM

Maybe some design work using Sketchup. Good designs are as important, maybe more, as the making. Google “Sketchup for Woodworking”. Several great videos.

View Rick_M's profile (online now)

Rick_M

10621 posts in 2216 days


#13 posted 11-01-2017 07:03 PM



Maybe some design work using Sketchup. Good designs are as important, maybe more, as the making. Google “Sketchup for Woodworking”. Several great videos.

- ScottM


Bam, win. Excellent suggestion.

My administration wants us to have “emergency sub plans”
- MrsN

Gotcha. Thought it might be something like that but the way schools are cutting industrial arts programs, you never know, haha.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Holt

167 posts in 2465 days


#14 posted 11-01-2017 07:10 PM

I’d hit up the Wood Whisperer and/or Renaissance Woodworker. Mark and/or Shannon might be willing to help encourage young woodworkers

-- ...Specialization is for insects.

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Chas7715

35 posts in 722 days


#15 posted 11-01-2017 07:30 PM

Whatever you do, teach SAFETY!!!
http://www.news9.com/story/36717513/edmond-north-student-injured-in-wood-shop-accident

-- Perfection is highly overrated!

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