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Starting chain saw after 2 years unused

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Forum topic by marcVT posted 11-01-2017 01:43 PM 582 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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marcVT

10 posts in 311 days


11-01-2017 01:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chain saw

Hi Folks

I have a husky (husqvarna) 394XP. Nice big saw. Little old.
Any tricks to start it up without seizing the engine?
I was considering taking out the spark plug and put a little 2 stroke oil in the cyl and crank a few times to lube it up.
Fresh gasoline mix too.
Thanks
Marc


12 replies so far

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

525 posts in 774 days


#1 posted 11-01-2017 02:12 PM

I’d rinse the gas tank out with fresh fuel, then fill it up and try to fire it up. Plan B would be to take it to a repair shop and have them work it over.

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Rich

2985 posts in 615 days


#2 posted 11-01-2017 03:05 PM

They sell products that are intended to clean the innards after a long period like that. As I recall it was added through the spark plug hole and mixed with the fuel. I got mine at HD. Didn’t work for my McCulloch though. I hope you have better luck.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View JRsgarage's profile

JRsgarage

250 posts in 535 days


#3 posted 11-01-2017 03:14 PM

i hear some people had success with PRI-G…i use it but for gas treatment for prevention

-- Two is One, One is None

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2939 posts in 2198 days


#4 posted 11-01-2017 03:31 PM

You don’t have to worry about seizing anything up if you use the proper oil gas mix. Your problem is going to be the 2 years of old gas oil mix sitting in carburetor and varnishing it up and sticking the reeds. Try it with the new gas mix if it doesn’t start you will need to get carb cleaned.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

534 posts in 1571 days


#5 posted 11-01-2017 03:42 PM

I’d drain the gas (assuming some is still in the tank) shoot a little carb and choke cleaner in the carburetor and the fuel line. Maybe replace the spark plug and put in some fresh gas and give it a go. A little Sea Foam mixed in with the gas might not hurt either to help clean out the needle valve.

That worked for me with a 051 Shihl that had sat for 15 or so years with gas in the tank.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5139 posts in 1746 days


#6 posted 11-01-2017 03:46 PM

^ +1, old gas varnishing up the carburetor will be your biggest obstacle, if you’re really worried about the cylinder a tiny bit of 2 stroke oil in the spark plug hole then pull the starter a few times to spread it around & get out any excess.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2718 posts in 3557 days


#7 posted 11-01-2017 04:23 PM

Next time you put it away, run it out of gas first. It’ll start easy next time you need it , just add gas.

-- My reality check bounced...

View LesB's profile

LesB

1748 posts in 3468 days


#8 posted 11-01-2017 05:00 PM

All good suggestions and I will add one more.
Two cycle engines tend to build up carbon deposits over time. There are a number of carbon cleaning products available and I would suggest that after you get the engine to run that you treat it with one of these products to clean the inside. Seafoam is one I use. It comes in both pour can and spray. Most Marine shops have similar sprays under various names. Follow the instructions on the container. Essentially with the engine running at a high idle you spray the product through the carb air intake until the engine stalls. Let it set for up to an hour and restart it. There will be a lot of smoke. In your case you might repeat the treatment. Then use the prescribed amount in you fuel mix to help clean the system of deposits. Note: After all that time your carb may have a heavy build up of deposits that could clog the jets requiring removal and cleaning of the carburetor. As I consider the situation I think I would remove and clean the carb (and fuel tank + add a new filter) before I do anything else just to stay ahead of any problems caused by the old fuel.
In the future be sure to add a fuel stabilizer to the fuel mix. Most say they preserve the fuel for a year. Stabil Marine grade is a good one as it has a corrosion inhibiting compound in it.

-- Les B, Oregon

View marcVT's profile

marcVT

10 posts in 311 days


#9 posted 11-01-2017 05:45 PM

Wow. Thanks for the great feedback. I am not a great 2-stroke / small engine guy. More of a rebuild a Chevy 350 w/ Quadrajet Carb when you were 20 & single kind of guy. This is really helpful! I’ll try some seafoam motor treatment and fuel stabilizer. I want to take care of my poor little carburetor. It’s a great saw and deserves TLC. I’ll get a new air filter while I’m at it. Not in a huge rush. Lots of neighbors with hardwood down so free firewood and stuff to work with.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#10 posted 11-01-2017 05:58 PM

If you properly stored the saw, then you should be able to just put in some fresh gas mix and bar oil and start cutting. Proper procedure is to drain the tank, then run the saw until it uses up the remaining fuel in the line and carb before storing for any length of time.

Not doing the above, or using cheap gas and/or 2-cycle oil will cause problems as mentioned in the posts above. The only other thing that you may want to check is the condition of the fuel lines and filters. I believe they recommend changing the fuel filter every year, and the air filter as needed… fortunately, you can get ‘tune-up’ kits for these saws pretty cheap, and they will include everything you need for under $20.

IF you did leave gas in the saw before storing… the carb is most likely gummed up and will need to be cleaned. For me, it’s easier to just replace the carb than get a re-build kit… usually it’s only a couple bucks more. I just did a Poulan saw that I bought back in 1997 and had been sitting in the shed for a couple years because of a cracked primer bulb and fuel lines. I got a complete re-build kit – new fuel lines, two fuel filters, air filter, spark,plug, primer bulb AND a new carb w/gaskets for $18. The thing now runs just as good as it did when I first bought it twenty years ago.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you use a good 2-cycle chainsaw oil, like Stihl, it already contains a stabilizer. And the synthetic is better than the dino stuff if you have a choice.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View LesB's profile

LesB

1748 posts in 3468 days


#11 posted 11-01-2017 06:58 PM

“And the synthetic is better than the dino stuff if you have a choice.”
_
FYI. Synthetic oil is dino stuff. It is made from natural gas and other oil based chemicals. It has fewer impurities than regular oil.

-- Les B, Oregon

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#12 posted 11-01-2017 08:30 PM

FYI. Synthetic oil is dino stuff. It is made from natural gas and other oil based chemicals. It has fewer impurities than regular oil.
- LesB

I’m no chemist… but when the bottle says fully synthetic, I take it to mean fully synthetic :)

I also am aware of some synthetic oils that are derived from fatty acids obtained from vegetables (ie: Trimethylolpropane Complex Ester). I believe that the Stihl HP Ultra is one such example.

Either way, as long as you use a high quality brand, conventional or synthetic, you will be golden.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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