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Forum topic by Karda posted 11-01-2017 03:56 AM 398 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


11-01-2017 03:56 AM

Hi, before I knew better i got a craftsman evolve table saw its cheap in more than one way. But thats what i have. I want to add a fence to the miter gauge but the gauge has no holes to attach anything to it the body is hollow plastic. I can’t just buy a new one because the miter slot is substandard. Does any body have any ideas thanks Mike


14 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

811 posts in 1281 days


#1 posted 11-01-2017 04:15 AM

I think I would abandon the miter gauge and make a cross-cut sled instead. Maybe two—-one for square cuts with a fixed fence and one with a pivoting fence for angle cuts

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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NoSpace

104 posts in 1080 days


#2 posted 11-01-2017 04:34 AM

Jerry is right. I bought the little DeWalt contractor saw for my first table saw and I nearly lost a finger just looking at the miter gauge. Only after at least a year of using it and having a feel for it did I dare use the miter gauge now and again for something quick. The very first thing I built when I got my table saw was a cross-cut sled (with several overblown safety features).

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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


#3 posted 11-01-2017 07:20 AM

one problem with a sled, the miter slots are under size and sear does not sell a rail long enough. what they sell is 8-9 inches for the miter gauge. I built a sled that run on the outer edges oif the table it worked ok but i think it is starting to warp. i wish i never saw the saw its a piece of junk but it is all i have. i am open to suggestions. where do you find baltic ply wood. That is all the makes on you tube use but I wouldn’t know where to look for it. Thanks

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jerryminer

811 posts in 1281 days


#4 posted 11-01-2017 07:35 AM

I buy Baltic birch from my local hardwood dealer. You could try asking at local cabinet shops—either for a small leftover piece, or to add a full sheet to their next plywood order.

You don’t need to use Sears’ miter bars—you can make one out of hardwood, or UHMW, or plywood, or ….

I make my sleds from mdf—it stays flat better for me than BB.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Carloz

986 posts in 431 days


#5 posted 11-01-2017 11:05 AM

Where do you live?
I had an Ace hardware version of that saw. I still have the miter gauge. It is quite substantial with cast aluminum body. If you are near San Diego you can pick it for free. Or you can stop by at Walmart they are quite inexpensive

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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


#6 posted 11-01-2017 10:25 PM

that walmart miter gauge looks a lot more substantial than the sears, Ill see if I can find one, an other thing this gauge has aclot of slop. You have to push against the slot or the cut will be bad. What size MDF do you use for the sled, any issues with screws not holding. also I was at Home Depot today and they had some 2×4 plywood. what is BCX OR BXC plywood, its 7 ply I think 22/64 looks like it woul=d make a good sled thanks

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Gaffneylumber

98 posts in 668 days


#7 posted 11-01-2017 10:32 PM

I agree with Jerry, why would you not use some hardwood and make your own rails?

-- Grayson - South Carolina

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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 11-01-2017 10:52 PM

I would except the slot is very small, standard is 3/8×3/4 deep and wide. Mine is 1/4×9/16 smaller the pull stick in a window shade

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MrUnix

6015 posts in 2038 days


#9 posted 11-01-2017 10:56 PM

I would except the slot is very small, standard is 3/8×3/4 deep and wide. Mine is 1/4×9/16 smaller the pull stick in a window shade
- Karda

I don’t see what that has to do with anything.. if you are making your own runners, you make them to whatever size you need. And the sled doesn’t need to be pretty, just functional. I have one I made out of scrap material that I’ve used on a little C-man for years… as long as the fence is perpendicular to the blade you are good.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


#10 posted 11-01-2017 11:03 PM

It would seem to me that a slender thin wood runner would not work as well as one that is more substantial. Thanks for the picture it more real. i have a problem with utbes on making sleds. It seems they are pros and the scraps they use are high end, and they use fancy power tools I can only dream of. Example every body on utbe uses baltic plywood. I have plenty of common plywood

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jerryminer

811 posts in 1281 days


#11 posted 11-01-2017 11:03 PM


What size MDF do you use for the sled?
- Karda

what is BCX OR BXC plywood
- Karda

1/2” or 3/4”—both work fine. I have not had issues with screws not holding—- I screw up through the mdf into the fence, and up through the rails into the “bed” of the sled.

BCX is construction-grade softwood plywood, with a “B” grade face and a “C” grade back, assembled with exterior-grade glue

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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jerryminer

811 posts in 1281 days


#12 posted 11-01-2017 11:06 PM



It would seem to me that a slender thin wood runner would not work as well as one that is more substantial.

- Karda

The runner doesn’t have to do much but fit the slot and stay straight. 1/4×9/16 would work fine.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Loren's profile

Loren

9637 posts in 3487 days


#13 posted 11-01-2017 11:09 PM

Any reasonably tough hardwood like oak will
work well as a sled runner. It will take plenty
of use to wear it out. You can, if you’re careful
with layout, cut dados in the bottom of the
sled and use thicker runners. They can
help pull a 1/2” piece of construction plywood
closer to flat. If you make it carefully a sled
made from junky materials can produce pretty
good results.

I haven’t done it much in recent years but I used
to salvage furniture from the trash to use for
making jigs and shop stuff.

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Karda

824 posts in 393 days


#14 posted 11-02-2017 12:12 AM

thanks I do have a large piece of plywood that appears to be more or less flat, I think it is 1/2 inch but I might by a piece. how does the birch plywood that HD carries compare that is only 3 ply but thicker plys, is it less stable

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