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Why Do I Need Air Filtration?

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Forum topic by Holubec37 posted 10-29-2017 05:22 PM 827 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holubec37

6 posts in 45 days


10-29-2017 05:22 PM

How much would I benefit from an air filtration system?

My workshop is a standalone 16×24 building. I’m curious to know if by adding a ceiling-mounted air filtration system, just how much cleaner my shop would be. Right now, I carry my mitre saw and table saw outside to eliminate dust buildup inside. The weather is a big variable in what types of equipment I get to use. I’m also planning on setting up a dust collection system such as a Dust Deputy or something similar so that I can leave the doors closed and turn on the AC/Heater depending on the season and outdoor conditions.

I see alot of reviews of these systems, but cannot really find answers to my questions about the performance. I do understand that they are not replacements for dust collection systems.

Do you run them while you’re running equipment, and then leaving them running for a period of time after you are done? This is just one of many questions I have. Most reviews of these systems (that I have come across) are just unboxings and how they mount them.

Any and all information regarding these systems would be appreciated. What have you learned from your experience with them?


30 replies so far

View JRsgarage's profile (online now)

JRsgarage

225 posts in 344 days


#1 posted 10-29-2017 05:56 PM

i usually scrub the air randomly throughout and turn it on for couple hours at end, after work for day is finished. i would want both dust collector and an air scrubber in any shop.

-- Two is One, One is None

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#2 posted 10-29-2017 06:06 PM

I don’t see them as useful for health reasons, but they are really good for generally trapping more of the fine dust in the shop air. They are especially useful if you don’t have a separate finishing room, the one I had (shop built) would clean the shop air really well in about 4 hours. It also reduced the buildup of the fine dust layer around in the shop. But for your lungs, by the time the filter gets it it’s already in your lungs….at least that’s the way I see it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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richardchaos

526 posts in 214 days


#3 posted 10-29-2017 06:29 PM

I to have a tiny workshop. I even have to wheel two of my bigger machines out to under the cars port that I don’t use very often to have enough room.

I deal almost all the time with PINE. and other softwoods.

I consider a Air filtarion system a LUXURY. If you are worried about breath stuff in as opposed to a clean safe shop I would wear a mask. I would suggest a Hilary Clinton one.

NOW ifI was doing high end ward wood furniture that requires a perfect finish I might have one swell. TRUST me I do get dust dirt and grime in some of my finishes but again its a luxury to me.

ALSO is everything in your shop on WHEELS like mine are? ALSO why are good casters so damn expensive. I mean hasn’t the WHEEL been around for like a million years


How much would I benefit from an air filtration system?

My workshop is a standalone 16×24 building. I m curious to know if by adding a ceiling-mounted air filtration system, just how much cleaner my shop would be. Right now, I carry my mitre saw and table saw outside to eliminate dust buildup inside. The weather is a big variable in what types of equipment I get to use. I m also planning on setting up a dust collection system such as a Dust Deputy or something similar so that I can leave the doors closed and turn on the AC/Heater depending on the season and outdoor conditions.

I see alot of reviews of these systems, but cannot really find answers to my questions about the performance. I do understand that they are not replacements for dust collection systems.

Do you run them while you re running equipment, and then leaving them running for a period of time after you are done? This is just one of many questions I have. Most reviews of these systems (that I have come across) are just unboxings and how they mount them.

Any and all information regarding these systems would be appreciated. What have you learned from your experience with them?

- Holubec37

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2186 days


#4 posted 10-29-2017 06:31 PM

Do you run them while you’re running equipment, and then leaving them running for a period of time after you are done?

I turn mine on when I enter the shop and leave it running for 1/2 hour after I exit. It pulls a lot of fine dust out of the air, the stuff you can’t see but will be breathing if you don’t have anything.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Gilley23

377 posts in 216 days


#5 posted 10-29-2017 06:46 PM

It’s woodworking, you’re going to be making dust with dang near everything you do. With that, you want to capture as much of the dust as you can before it has the chance to be spread around the air….i.e. catch it right at the source. For me this is a Harbor Freight dust collector attached to the side of my table saw and shop vacs that automatically turn on with individual machines.

You also want to be able to not just move air around, but actually exchange it with fresh air. I use a ceiling mounted air scrubber as well as a conditioned ventilation system. By that I mean I’m using my garage as a workshop and my AC unit pulls fresh air in from the multitude of air leaks that are in there.

Works for me. It’s not perfect by any means, but it’s good for what I’m doing. I still have to take the planer outside to use it, I don’t have that collection for that.

Run the scrubber while you’re in there and then for a little bit longer after you leave.

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a1Jim

116561 posts in 3411 days


#6 posted 10-29-2017 07:20 PM

Maybe not the way many shops are but the best situation is to capture dust before it’s in the air by that time it’s really to late to gain any health benefits from adding a ceiling-mounted air filtration system unless you can turn it on and let it run for some time.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Andybb

546 posts in 438 days


#7 posted 10-29-2017 07:59 PM

#1 reasonEven using a dust collector I know it’s helping. If I am cutting something that is red like padouk a half hour after I’m done there is a red tint on the filter, which means I would be breathing that and MDF and other nasty fine stuff. Even with the doors open and the fan on, if I spray rattle can paint the filter tints to that color.

2. Happy wife happy life. My wife calls my shop a 2 car garage and even with a fan blowing out the fine dust ends up in the house, on the car and in the car if a window is left open. Not an issue for you but it is for a lot of us.

I originally bought it for reason #2 not knowing that reason #1 was even happening. That was a “holy s**t” moment for me when I saw the red padauk in the filter. I probably should always wear a mask but I know I won’t but I do when I’m cutting stuff like that.

For me, moving tools outside is a pain and an inefficient use of time. I like to be able to move from one tool to the other even though I have everything on wheels.

I bought a Wen off of Amazon. It has a remote and a timer on it. I try to remember to turn it on then set the timer for 2 hrs when I’m done and forget about it. Well worth the $99 bucks on sale IMO. So quiet that I sometimes forget it’s on.

It really doesn’t do anything to help keep the shop clean. I just sweep and also use a leaf blower every few weeks. Using a zero clearance insert doesn’t help plus I use a big shop vac system so I don’t have the huge suction like Loren does.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Loren

9609 posts in 3482 days


#8 posted 10-29-2017 08:15 PM

I have one and I don’t use it much and even
if I did I don’t think it would keep the shop
much cleaner.

I have a second dust collector outside the shop
and sometimes I put on a mask, blow all over
the place with compressed air, turn on the dust
collector, put the hose in the shop and roll the
door down. It’s a big dust collector and it
sucks that airborne dust out pretty quick.

View jmos's profile (online now)

jmos

796 posts in 2204 days


#9 posted 10-29-2017 09:00 PM

I’ve got a good dust collection system (ClearVue 1800) and a ceiling mounted air filter (Powermatic) with Wynn filters. I always use the dust collector, but only turned on the air filter when I was doing things that I figured kicked up the most dust. I’ve been working this way for about 5 years.

I recently decided to buy a Dylos meter, with the extended lower particle size range, just to get some data on what was really going on. While I’m not going to argue it’s 100% accurate, I think it does give a good relative sense as to what’s going on.

What I discovered -

On the good side: The dust collector really does do a good job in most cases when I’m using my large equipment. When sanding, I use a homemade downdraft table and the dust port on my Porter Cable sander; I used to wear a respirator, but discovered that the dust levels were really quite low. I can also use the dust collector to filter general dust out of the air, as Loren mentions above, and it works pretty quickly.

On the bad side: Sweeping up REALLY kicks up dust; highest levels I ever see. However, just moving around in the shop working kicks up dust, and at high enough levels to worry about. I now run my air filter the entire time I’m in the shop, and it does help keep the dust level down. This surprised me, but was a good lesson.

So, my takeaway, capturing dust at the source is always best, but the ceiling mounted air filter is a worthwhile device and should be used.

-- John

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Manitario

2553 posts in 2717 days


#10 posted 10-29-2017 11:18 PM

Ambient air filters slowly reduce the dust in the air over a period of time; while they are reducing the dust load, you’re breathing it in. The best solution is to capture dust at the source before it gets into the air

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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Carloz

962 posts in 426 days


#11 posted 10-29-2017 11:22 PM

I have a Jet air filter and leave it on for 4 hours after I leave the garage. It makes a huge difference. If I forget to turn it on I have a thin film of dust on everything by morning.I would seriously question someones claim above that half hour makes any noticeable difference.

View Holubec37's profile

Holubec37

6 posts in 45 days


#12 posted 10-29-2017 11:35 PM

Thanks everyone for the input. My next question would be the orientation of the system when mounted from the ceiling. Is it best to just mount in the middle, or more towards the end with the most dust generated?

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jonah

1447 posts in 3133 days


#13 posted 10-30-2017 02:46 AM

It’s usually best to mount it nearer to a wall to get a sort of swirling air circulation going. Mounting in the middle is less effective.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 830 days


#14 posted 10-30-2017 04:13 AM

I run mine more or less anytime I’m in the shop. Even if not making dust, just moving around the shop kicks up the dust that is there. The most harmful dust is invisible floating in the air. I have a Dylos air particle counter and it is interesting to see how the dust count goes up while moving around the shop and doing things. Of course, this is less an issue the cleaner the shop. But unless you’ve recently mopped the floor and wiped down bench tops etc, there’s dust.

I agree, best to capture at the source, but I see a room filter not as either or, but rather something extra. It certainly helps keep the shop cleaner. As the dust trapped in the filter would otherwise be dispersed around the shop. Will it mean you never have to sweep. No it doesn’t. Dust settles pretty quickly and unless you have something constantly stirring ALL the air in the shop, the room filter won’t get it all. But it will clean all the air over time.

Most of the time, 15 minutes or so reduces the dust count by a large amount. This of coruse depends on the CFM rating of the filter, the size of the shop, and how high the dust level is to start.

I run mine while cutting and at least 30 minutes after before taking off my respirator. Though often I’m making many cuts so it’s just on all the time. I still wear a respirator until I see the particle count is low. Mine has a timer and I run it the minimum of 2 hrs when I leave the shop. It’s common my particle count will get down to 0 when I do this.

Concerning placement, I’ve heard placing it about 1/3 the length of the shop, with the intake on the short end. I agree with this. The intake air comes form all directions so at any given point the air speed is pretty low. So keeping the intake on the short side, reduces the size of the dead area. The exhaust stays more as a high speed column of air due to the momentum of the air. So this end does a better job of stirring things up.

I’m not sure I buy the idea that it needs to be to one side to create a circulation. If in the middle it will simply have circulation on both sides. Likely there is some advantage of one location over the other, but I’m not sure the suggestion of putting to the side is backed up by any actual knowledge. If so, I’d be interested in see the references.

I’d put it were it is convenient. And if to the side is convenient, then sure why not, maybe there is something to that. But I wouldn’t sweat that one way or the other.

-- Clin

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Jim Finn

2575 posts in 2756 days


#15 posted 10-30-2017 01:06 PM

I have mine mounted on the ceiling in the center of my small shop. The CFM rating predicts it to clean all the air in my shop in six minutes. And it does just that. I turn it on anytime I see dust in the air. It does not keep the floor and benches dust free but it sure cleans up the air I am breathing, and quickly.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

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