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Forum topic by Carloz posted 10-29-2017 03:09 PM 908 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carloz

1147 posts in 677 days


10-29-2017 03:09 PM

I need a set o narrow, 3” x 6” x 9”corbels, something similar to the pictured. I do not have a CNC I do have a router and a table. The side part is obvious but how do you make the recess on the front curved surface? Material is hard hard maole so I do not think I can carve it out by hand.


22 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117179 posts in 3663 days


#1 posted 10-29-2017 03:59 PM

Rough Band saw out then carve, Use a CNC or make router templets to router it out or buy it online.

https://www.osbornewood.com/8013.aspx

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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jbay

2494 posts in 985 days


#2 posted 10-29-2017 04:46 PM



I need a set o narrow, 3” x 6” x 9”corbels, something similar to the pictured. I do not have a CNC I do have a router and a table. The side part is obvious but how do you make the recess on the front curved surface? Material is hard hard maole so I do not think I can carve it out by hand.
- Carloz

maole is easy to carve.

You would have to build a jig with the desired curve that the router would ride on.
jig, jig, jig
It’s all about the jig

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8295 posts in 2663 days


#3 posted 10-29-2017 05:01 PM

+ 1 for Jbay

Rembo has a fine pictorial
http://lumberjocks.com/Rembo/blog/26689

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Andybb

1144 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 10-29-2017 05:08 PM



+ 1 for Jbay

Rembo has a fine pictorial
http://lumberjocks.com/Rembo/blog/26689

- waho6o9


Damn! Not that’s a JIG!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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a1Jim

117179 posts in 3663 days


#5 posted 10-29-2017 06:00 PM

That is a killer fixture but by the time he made it he could have had them made for less then all the jig components cost unless he’s got to make a lot of corbels.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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Woodknack

12243 posts in 2466 days


#6 posted 10-29-2017 07:08 PM

I would buy them or have them made. This is why architectural millwork is lucrative.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Carloz

1147 posts in 677 days


#7 posted 10-29-2017 07:31 PM

It is $75 a piece I need 4. But regardless the price what is the point of woodworking then ? Just go to the store I buy whatever you want to make.

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Rich

3351 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 10-30-2017 01:30 AM

Well, If I were dopey enough to build them instead of taking Jim and Rick’s excellent advice to just buy them, I’d do the front curved piece stiles as bent lamination. That way you get a clean grain line on the exposed side. The nested (or secondary) stile is a toss-up depending on its thickness, and the center panel is a clear candidate for steam bending. The side nested frame is probably another bent-lam due to the thickness along the bend. The rest is just bandsaw work and flush trim with a template to get them all the same. Of course, besides your bending jigs, you’ll need to fabricate clamping jigs for your glue-up.

Of course, by this time, you’re two weeks into the job, you’ve probably wasted more wood than you thought possible on failed bends, you have a half-dozen bending jigs in the garbage that didn’t give you the right result, and the resulting corbels are something that looks like a hack-job compared to the commercial corbels that you should have sprung for in the first place.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

807 posts in 1670 days


#9 posted 10-30-2017 01:44 AM

I would by them without further thought.

However, if there was a unique and compelling reason to be able to say you made them, then I would simplify the design to something less fussy and busy, and that I knew how to produce.

After all, you said “similar”, so an exact duplicate isn’t needed, and that one seems to have a lot going on for something as small as you indicated.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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Rich

3351 posts in 675 days


#10 posted 10-30-2017 01:54 AM

The suggestion to simplify the design is a good one. Here’s one option:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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AlaskaGuy

4274 posts in 2395 days


#11 posted 10-30-2017 02:40 AM

Buy or make. It’s just depends. If you in business and it not something you’re setup for buy it. If you a hobbits and want the challenge research it and build it if you’re in no hurry.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12243 posts in 2466 days


#12 posted 10-30-2017 04:01 AM



It is $75 a piece I need 4. But regardless the price what is the point of woodworking then ? Just go to the store I buy whatever you want to make.

- Carloz


Point taken and if you get satisfaction from making them then that is what you should do. I’ve found that I don’t want or need to be an expert at everything and some things are best left to a professional. But some people like to do everything themselves, I have no argument with that.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2288 posts in 1473 days


#13 posted 10-30-2017 04:49 AM

If it is decorative and not a structural piece, you could sort of deconstruct it and make it from components. For example, think about the side piece as a frame and either cut the entire shape from a board with a jig saw or make from 2 straight pieces and a curved one. Make an identical smaller one for the inside frame and use a piece of thin plywood for the back. Make 2 of these and connect them with the straight pieces between them. For the curved back on the front, you could try a piece of veneer that is thin enough to conform to the curve. You might want use a 2×6 ( or whatever width you need) to help tie the 2 sides together.

Or just buy them.

Edit: an alternative method would be to cut out the rough shape on the bad saw, and add trim pieces to build up the frames.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View dubois's profile

dubois

41 posts in 1917 days


#14 posted 10-30-2017 11:50 AM

I can appreciate the premise of the query, that is, more woodworking knowledge and experience leading to increased skill and self-reliance. Way to go Carloz. To respond with, “Go and buy it.” is really a non-response, isn’t it.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8295 posts in 2663 days


#15 posted 10-30-2017 02:10 PM

It’s a challenge for sure and I’m thinking hand tools may be the way to go for the
more difficult aspects of the front curve.
Have fun and looking forward to seeing the corbels in the project thread!

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