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Forum topic by richardchaos posted 10-29-2017 12:53 AM 847 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardchaos

583 posts in 220 days


10-29-2017 12:53 AM

I have been to more than one Estate sale/auction. In many of these you see tons of older hand and power tools.

I often think of the person that used them, Built stuff with them. Now here their tools sit rusted and going for pennies or nothing to be tossed out onto the scrap heap of craftsmanship and caring.

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell


10 replies so far

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Sparks500

95 posts in 171 days


#1 posted 10-29-2017 01:13 PM

Welcome to our future. Sad to say, but I don’t see any of my kids or grandkids showing any interest in my shop or tools .Maybe if I live long enough, one of them may mature into it.
Wife is already asking me what my plans are for them, (the tools and machinery), my reply? Thats YOUR problem..( ;

-- Rockhound: You realize we're sitting on 45,000 pounds of fuel, one nuclear warhead and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder? Makes you feel good doesn't it?

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Carloz

989 posts in 432 days


#2 posted 10-29-2017 03:36 PM

Why would they need your primitive tools if all they would have to do is to say “Alexa, make me a kitchen island”. You do not use a flint axe to mill your work either.

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richardchaos

583 posts in 220 days


#3 posted 10-29-2017 05:21 PM

ALEXA. PLEADS THE FIFTH!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2ej3X7djtQ


Why would they need your primitive tools if all they would have to do is to say “Alexa, make me a kitchen island”. You do not use a flint axe to mill your work either.

- Carloz

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2157 days


#4 posted 10-29-2017 07:33 PM


Welcome to our future. Sad to say, but I don t see any of my kids or grandkids showing any interest in my shop or tools .

My lumber rep tells me that a large number of their customers are closing the doors and it’s not because of a bad economy. It’s due to aging owners retiring and their employees aren’t much younger either. I recently bought some clamps from one of these closing shops.

It’s hard for me to complain though. Demand for my services can only increase when the older generations quit. I’m buried in work and the the local cabinet shops that are still open are buried in work.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Sparks500

95 posts in 171 days


#5 posted 10-30-2017 12:07 PM

People that can fix things, create things, work around things will always be in demand. The trick is getting PAID for it…

-- Rockhound: You realize we're sitting on 45,000 pounds of fuel, one nuclear warhead and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder? Makes you feel good doesn't it?

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jonah

1474 posts in 3139 days


#6 posted 10-30-2017 12:15 PM

Tools are just tools. They don’t have feelings. I try to avoid sentimentalizing about them.

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MrRon

4497 posts in 3084 days


#7 posted 10-30-2017 04:07 PM

I can compare a fine tool or machine to a fine Stradavarias.

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Bluenote38

220 posts in 229 days


#8 posted 10-30-2017 04:18 PM



I can compare a fine tool or machine to a fine Stradavarias.

- MrRon

Very true – It’s why I prefer “rescue” tools.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

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Tim

3685 posts in 1802 days


#9 posted 10-30-2017 05:07 PM



Why would they need your primitive tools if all they would have to do is to say “Alexa, make me a kitchen island”. You do not use a flint axe to mill your work either.

- Carloz

Good point. Except for the relatively small number of people that use hand tools for enjoyment, most of the rest of their value is for collecting, decorating, or museums. But as one of those people that enjoys using them, I love that they go for pennies on the dollar. Also I did see a youtube video of a guy chopping down a tree with a stone axe. He found it interesting for his research and I found it interesting to watch.

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OleGrump

132 posts in 185 days


#10 posted 11-01-2017 12:52 PM

It IS sad, especially when one thinks that often these tools were used by someone to support themselves and their families. BUT, it does seem that there is a healthy interest in rescuing, restoring and using these wonderful old tools. Looking at many of the posts relative to various hand tools here on LJ is very reassuring. I agree with the statement above, that as a USER, it is good to be able to acquire many of the tools one needs inexpensively, as the power toolers disdain them. In an aside, I was recently given about eight nice old hand tools by a friend who knew I was interested in them. When I offered to pay him for these, he refused any sort of payment, saying that he’d rather give the tools to someone who appreciated them, rather than see them thrown on the dump. (sadly, he himself could no longer use them due to health reasons)
Another observation. While the younger males in the family may never actually USE them, they anticipate inheriting some of the family heirloom tools in my collection. This is especially true of a 19th century “truing plane” which was used to build the house where my father was born in 1918.

-- OleGrump

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