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Forum topic by MrRon posted 10-28-2017 05:16 PM 340 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

4495 posts in 3081 days


10-28-2017 05:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

When I was growing up, magazines like Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Mechanics Illustrated and Science and Mechanics were the only magazines sold on the news stand and that is where I got my interest in all things mechanical. They had articles on woodworking, fixing your car, building electronic devices, etc. Today only PS and PM survive, but they are no longer informative with articles on building things except for a few rudimentary projects. I learned much from those magazines and had a complete collection. Those magazines also ran ads for all the major tool manufacturers of the day. I would write away for their free catalogs and would compile a very complete collection of catalogs. I would spend hours pouring over catalogs and magazines when my peers would be reading comic books. I didn’t have many of the tools illustrated in those catalogs, but I could put together an image of how that tool worked and what it could do. It also enabled me to compare like tools to come up with a value/quality relationship. One might say, I ate tools day and night; that was my consuming passion (until girls became my principal interest). Today, I still follow tool technology and due to my past experience, feel I am capable of distinguishing good from bad tools. There is an application on Google that lets you read PM and PS magazines complete from cover to cover. They date back to the beginning of the magazine to the present; very interesting reading. I feel they are a valuable source of tools and a treasure trove of information long forgotten. When I start reading them, the time flies by so fast. I am reminded of how it was and compare it to how it is. I have posted the two Google sites, but beware; they are addictive.

https://books.google.com/books?id=ESgDAAAAMBAJ&source=gbs_summary_s&hl=en#all_issues_anchor
https://books.google.com/books?id=v98DAAAAMBAJ


3 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3722 posts in 2104 days


#1 posted 10-28-2017 06:16 PM

I was the only kid that preferred machinery row at the state fair to the midway. I was alone there many times while the rest of the group was at the midway part. Mechanics Illustrated; I had a subscription to for about 4-5 years. I really enjoyed Tom McCahill’s car tests. In college magazine reading was not something that I had time for any more so quit.

I learned a lot from them too. The kids I grew up with their dad was a mechanical genius and made many different things and was the best tune-up mechanic I have ever known, also teaching me many things too.

I like you still try to learn/try different things all the time even now. We now have forums like this that help us. I also go to U-Tube although the navigating there can be a challenge to keep from the invasive pron.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View Rich's profile

Rich

1981 posts in 427 days


#2 posted 10-29-2017 03:48 AM

Thanks for the link. I coveted my Allied catalog and when a new issue of Popular Electronics hit the stand, I went straight to the new projects and priced them out using my catalog. Whether it was a signal generator, or a mini oscilloscope with a 3” CRT, I was on it.

Then I’d total the cost, figure out how many lawns I had to mow at $2 apiece and realized I had to wait for the next month’s issue.

Later, I started asking for Heathkits for birthdays and Christmas and actually got some cool stuff built, like an oscilloscope, power supplies, multimeters, etc.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4495 posts in 3081 days


#3 posted 10-29-2017 04:12 PM



Thanks for the link. I coveted my Allied catalog and when a new issue of Popular Electronics hit the stand, I went straight to the new projects and priced them out using my catalog. Whether it was a signal generator, or a mini oscilloscope with a 3” CRT, I was on it.

Then I d total the cost, figure out how many lawns I had to mow at $2 apiece and realized I had to wait for the next month s issue.

Later, I started asking for Heathkits for birthdays and Christmas and actually got some cool stuff built, like an oscilloscope, power supplies, multimeters, etc.

- Rich


I too built Heathkits, Eico kits and Dynaco stereo equipment. Although I am more into metal machining, I do some woodworking projects. I’m just more into precision. Growing up in New York City, I had access to the most electronics stores in the country along with machinery and tool dealers. Now-a-days, it’s all via the web.

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