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Running air lines for a new Husky 60 gallon compressor

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 10-26-2017 11:14 AM 4209 views 0 times favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

242 posts in 494 days


10-26-2017 11:14 AM

I finally bit the bullet yesterday and bought a new 60 gallon Husky air compressor to run my paint gun and other various air tools. This is my first large compressor. I now need to run some air lines, and this is where I could use some help.

I have decided to use Pex because it is cheap and easy. I want to run a line into my dedicated paint room, and it will have to snake through the top of two door openings. One of the openings is a hall way with no actual door, the other is the door that goes into my paint room. Can’t go through the walls because they are concrete, and I am renting. The owner did say that I could notch the door though.

Anyway, my plan is to have a single line (for now) that goes along the back wall of my shop where the compressor is mounted. It will slope down towards the compressor, then it will snake through the top of the two door ways and into the paint room, at which point it will go down to chest level where I will install a “T” for the riser, which will be roughly 6” tall with a blow out valve at the bottom and my dryer/filter/regulator off to the side. Does this sound good? Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.


45 replies so far

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

663 posts in 1054 days


#1 posted 10-26-2017 11:26 AM

can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

242 posts in 494 days


#2 posted 10-26-2017 01:22 PM

V


can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

- tomsteve

I plan to leave the compressor on the pallet it came on. See post below for pics.

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SweetTea

242 posts in 494 days


#3 posted 10-26-2017 01:23 PM

Pics:

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

242 posts in 494 days


#4 posted 10-26-2017 01:25 PM

See that door in the back ground inside the hallway? The line will run through the top left corner of that door, and onto the left side of the wall on room on the other side of that door.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1315 days


#5 posted 10-26-2017 03:36 PM

Here is a quote from a thread on Sawmillcreek:

I sent an email to a company that supplies PEX (pexconnection.com) here is what he said when I asked about using PEX for compressed air in a hobby woodworking shop

” Air is routinely used for pressure testing PEX plumbing systems, and we use it here to distribute the air for our air compressor, so I would say that it should not be a problem for you to do that.”

Then I asked about exposure to fluorescent lights in my shop. And his reply was:
“For best results, you will most likely need to cover it. PEX should not be exposed to direct UV light for more than 30 days. I will say, however, that the PEX we are using (for water and air) is exposed to direct fluorescent light and indirect sunlight and is performing well. Still, the recommendation is that it not be exposed to UV light.”

I used PEX for the first time to move a toilet supply in our basement. It is so much nicer to work with than copper.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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AlaskaGuy

3644 posts in 2144 days


#6 posted 10-26-2017 11:54 PM

http://www.hoseandfittingsetc.com/our-blog/bid/94802/what-type-of-pipe-should-i-use-for-my-air-compressor

I don’t see pex on this list. Do it right with recommend materials. I’m often times disappointed when I do thing cheap and easy.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

3644 posts in 2144 days


#7 posted 10-27-2017 12:00 AM



can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

- tomsteve


Good advice

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

56 posts in 610 days


#8 posted 10-27-2017 12:53 AM

I used Pex in my shop,never again. I installed it properly but it leaks down. Leaks are very small and silent but there are many.
Use black pipe,or soldered copper.

View msinc's profile

msinc

102 posts in 338 days


#9 posted 10-27-2017 01:34 AM

Aside from metal pipe, such as black iron or galvanized, the only proper air line I am aware of that is a plastic type is ABS. Many shops have their airlines plumbed with PVC and have probably never had a problem…yet….but PVC is dangerous because if it breaks it shatters like glass into big sharp shards that can and will inflict severe wounds or cuts. You definitely do not want to be in the same room when a PVC airline decides to fail.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10612 posts in 2215 days


#10 posted 10-27-2017 01:34 AM

Why not use air hose? It’s fairly inexpensive and designed to hold air.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View pontic's profile

pontic

500 posts in 443 days


#11 posted 10-27-2017 02:43 AM



I used Pex in my shop,never again. I installed it properly but it leaks down. Leaks are very small and silent but there are many.
Use black pipe,or soldered copper.

- Richard Lee


I too experienced this. I went back to soldered copper for 125psi. I recommend black pipe for higher pressures.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3644 posts in 2144 days


#12 posted 10-27-2017 03:23 AM

Each to their own, I went with type M copper and sliver solder. Type M is the thicker walled and is approved for air. Home Depot has it. Silver solder is recommend for fire reason so I read. Higher melting point in case of a shop fire.

The potential problem with just running standard hose is if you don’t keep it straight every little dip will be a possible water trap. Read up on running you lines to take care of moisture in the system. This is all on line for the reading;

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#13 posted 10-27-2017 03:31 AM

For safety reasons you should never use plastic pipe for compressed air systems. Use only copper or black iron. if it is a temporary system you could just run a big air hose as previously mentioned (3/8” or 1/2”).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TheTurtleCarpenter's profile

TheTurtleCarpenter

989 posts in 901 days


#14 posted 10-27-2017 05:22 AM



For safety reasons you should never use plastic pipe for compressed air systems. Use only copper or black iron. if it is a temporary system you could just run a big air hose as previously mentioned (3/8” or 1/2”).

- TungOil
</blockquot

True ! I am guilty as anybody but my insurance writer at my previous buisness informed me that a plastic or rubber line that was exposed to heat and failed, would fuel a fire and intenseify it.

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle",,,,,member MWTCA area K. Kentucky

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1621 posts in 2644 days


#15 posted 10-27-2017 11:43 AM



Why not use air hose? It s fairly inexpensive and designed to hold air.

- Rick_M

Hahaha !.....I didn’t want to say anything

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