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53 year old sears ras

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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 1161 days ago 1119 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

9540 posts in 1190 days


1161 days ago

I rebuilt an OLD craftsman RAS 2 years ago after my dad died and I inherited it.I had never used a RAS and this one had no blade when I got it so I put a blade on and trued everything up and have used it a lot since then.A friend recently visited and told me I had the blade on backwards!I obviously push it into the work instead of pulling it.This has been working well,seemsw safer to me,and Im reluctant to change.I have hold dows on the table which I always use.Should I change to pulling?The second question I have:is there any way to get a copy of the owners manual for this RAS?Thanks in advance for all the good advice I know Ill get!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


18 replies so far

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2094 posts in 2228 days


#1 posted 1161 days ago

are you sure the blade was on backwards? I find it hard to believe you would ever make it through a cut.

I’m pretty sure that by pushing, you risk the blade lifting the board during the cut and causing a potentially dangerous situation (like the carriage flying at you very hard). I’d look into buying the mr sawdust book, or something like it. It will explain all the right ways to work with the saw in a much safer manner.

View harvey4804's profile

harvey4804

105 posts in 1181 days


#2 posted 1161 days ago

^^^ thats what I was thinking

-- Ryan, FRMR HMM165 - HMX1 01-10

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5277 posts in 1732 days


#3 posted 1161 days ago

I am no expert here, but every RAS cut I have ever seen done is done the same was an SCMS cuts, pushing…. I am not sure how old saws were marked, but almost every saw I have seen has an arrow somewhere near the blade to show the rotation direction for the blade….

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View dfdye's profile

dfdye

372 posts in 1537 days


#4 posted 1161 days ago

The radial arm saw should cut on the pull, no question. The teeth should be traveling backwards when they are on the bottom, so the blade will appear to be turning clockwise when you are standing to the left of the blade. The teeth should be pointed “back” at the bottom of the blade.

If you are not sure about how to use the RAS, I just Googled a decent video that seems to be OK and has a pretty good explanation of how the saw works and how it should be used and set up. Hope this helps!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SB7VYaA3wvM&feature=related

-- David from Indiana --

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 1161 days ago

Contact Emerson Tool Co. they sent me a manual for mine. On mine I pull for the cut instead of pushing through the cut. It looks like the it should be pushed through the cut. But I was told by who I don’t remember that I should pull through the cut as opposed to pushing. It looks like I’m cutting backwards but it cuts smooth for me. Mine is a 1958 model as well and the blade guard recall for a new blade guard retrofit isn’t available for that model RAS.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2094 posts in 2228 days


#6 posted 1161 days ago

I know it seems wrong, but dfdye explained it right. cut on the pull. a mitersaw is a whole different beast and the two motions should not be confused.

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2446 days


#7 posted 1161 days ago

You cut on the pull. However you must use a blade with a minus hook angle. For years I didn’t and always wondered why the saw walked toward me and hogged wood. You didn’t have to pull it you had to hold it back.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

View teejk's profile

teejk

1185 posts in 1184 days


#8 posted 1161 days ago

it’s definitely a “pull” cut and the tendency to pull the work piece away from the fence explains why the RAS is not quite as accurate as a miter saw (but still good enough for 99% of what I ever need it for). I’ll try the minus hook blade next time I use mine.

definitely order the manual. I can’t find mine any more but I know they go into great detail on how to keep the thing aligned properly. there is A LOT going on with the RAS what with a movable arm, yoke pivoting for ripping, motor pivoting within the yoke for angle cuts, etc. etc. etc.

Sears sold a pile of these things. yours being as old as it is (when Sears sold some pretty good stuff), it will serve you well.

View Carl Webster's profile

Carl Webster

82 posts in 1298 days


#9 posted 1161 days ago

Go to “Sears.com” Website and in the left side of the Home page you will find “Replacement Parts”. If you go to this site and plug in the model number of your saw, they may list a manual in PDF format. I own several “old” Sears Craftsman power tools made by Emerson Electric (Tablesaw, Radial Arm Saw, Lathe) and I have been able to download manuals from this site. All the Craftsman power tools made by Emerson begin with the model # 113.

-- Carl in SC

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2094 posts in 2228 days


#10 posted 1161 days ago

teejk,
I don’t understand your post. Why do you think the saw pulls the wood away from the fence? It should actually be the opposite. You pull the carriage toward you, but the blade still spins in a direction that should force the wood against the fence (no different from a miter saw).

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2446 days


#11 posted 1161 days ago

I didn’t understand teejk’s statement either. The blade pushes the wood back against the fence. What the minus 5 degree hook angle does is keep the blade from climbing into the wood and pulling itself forward. It acts like (and I guess it is) coming to get you. When my boys were working in my shop I had to keep telling them “hold it back! it will come forward on it’s own.” That’s back before I found out about the minus degree hook angle blade.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

View teejk's profile

teejk

1185 posts in 1184 days


#12 posted 1161 days ago

hokie…with the pull stroke, there is a tendency to pull the piece away from the fence on the start of the cut. at some point when the teeth engage, you are correct that it will pull back. I think that is what Pop referred to as “hogging”. maybe it was a function of the blades I was using.

but as I mentioned, the RAS cuts good enough for almost anything you will use it for (a heavy duty Crafstman my primary big tool for 15 years).

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1680 days


#13 posted 1161 days ago

Search the model number on Google. You should find a manual. I have a Craftsman from 1961 (50 years old!) Like everyone has said, you should be able to pull it through the wood. They aren’t the most powerfull saws and you’ll want a nice sharp blade with a negative hook angle. It will try to come toward you if you move too fast or have a bad blade.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1809 posts in 2223 days


#14 posted 1161 days ago

What model number RAS do you have? There are quite a few manuals at the Vintage.org website. Select RAS in the tool type and it will show only RAS stuff.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9540 posts in 1190 days


#15 posted 1161 days ago

Thanks for all the comments.I knew you all would help.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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