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Forum topic by Logan Windram posted 10-22-2017 01:49 PM 365 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Logan Windram

341 posts in 2273 days


10-22-2017 01:49 PM

Good morning, Ladies and Gents-

Finally get started on building my 36×24 shop in my back yard, I am beginning to think about how to insulate. There is obviously copious info in a Google search, but sometimes too much information, it well, too much information.

Im not certain spraying closed cell/ open cell makes sense for the cost of a contractor, maybe that is folly. I can do faced batts and air barrier, easily. I can probably attempt dense pack cellulose, but maybe a contractor who knows what they’re doing makes sense.

Energy efficiency is a concern, but what about noise control in a residential building?

Also, any thought on whether to out the electrical in the walls, or because its a shop, put it all in metal ducitng over the walls, with the thought that machines and layout may change.

I know this is a little off topic, but there is a lot knowledge here and who knows better what Im trying to get at than fellow woodworkers.

PS- I live in Denver, so not really gold winters but sometimes hot summers.

Thank you as always LJs- you folks are the best….


5 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

645 posts in 627 days


#1 posted 10-22-2017 02:27 PM

I am building the same size shop and I have exactly the same dilemmas. My current shop evolved over many years and I rewired it several times before sealing up the walls. I would like to be able to use my initial setup for a while to see whether it needs changes. I have thought about just running everything in conduit.

As far as sound goes, plain old fiberglass bat insulation and sealing will reduce the outside noise dramatically. I found that out when I insulated my current shop. The shop I am in now is about 200 feet from the nearest neighbor but my new shop (new address) will be about 100 feet away. I don’t feel I really have a choice in sound insulation in my new neighborhood.

You are right about the amount of information available on the internet. It is sometimes contradictory and hard to apply. I am going to watch this thread closely.

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

341 posts in 2273 days


#2 posted 10-22-2017 03:33 PM



I am building the same size shop and I have exactly the same dilemmas. My current shop evolved over many years and I rewired it several times before sealing up the walls. I would like to be able to use my initial setup for a while to see whether it needs changes. I have thought about just running everything in conduit.

As far as sound goes, plain old fiberglass bat insulation and sealing will reduce the outside noise dramatically. I found that out when I insulated my current shop. The shop I am in now is about 200 feet from the nearest neighbor but my new shop (new address) will be about 100 feet away. I don t feel I really have a choice in sound insulation in my new neighborhood.

You are right about the amount of information available on the internet. It is sometimes contradictory and hard to apply. I am going to watch this thread closely.

- ArtMann

Thanks ArtMann- yeah, there is just too much info and many sources contradict or at least appear too… I am quite skeptical about the attainable results of different insulations with regards to cost to install… expensive spray foam is great and all, but is it worth the extra expense which is substantial when what I am looking for is “comfortable”, after al it is a shop/ converted garage. R60 or higher value seem impressive, but if it is only incrementally better than R20 with regards to comfort and expense, then it might not justify the extra expense in a space that is only occupied 20-30 hours a week.

As far the electrical, I am leaning toward conduit unless someone has a reasoning otherwise. I have a seperate Jointer/Planer now, but I am considering do a helical combo machine (that is its own debate)... Id also like to havea drum sander at some point so having a electrical layout that is flexible makes alot of sense… I don’t care about aesthetics and I assume no one who buys this house of we sell cares about the electrical in the garage other than is the lights turn on and opener does its job.

I am going to do a 2 hp or 3hp cyclone as well, and plan to vent that rig outside…. but I have seen others just build a small cabinet for the DC, and just have access to it outside… but I think I could just repipe the filter portion outside since that is the exhaust per se, and just inclose it outside somehow to reduce the dust blowing everywhere… some thoughts on a 1.5, 2 or 3 HP collector would be appreciated as well.. the cost difference isn’t that big, but no reason to mount a 400lb machine rather than a 200lb machine if the end performance is about the same.

Glad you are getting the chance to build your shop as well, AM- this is my midlife crisis project, but I figure I have no kids, live pretty cheap and this is more productive than a sports car or something,, lol…

LW

View jonah's profile

jonah

1374 posts in 3110 days


#3 posted 10-22-2017 03:37 PM

Open cell foam gives the best sound attenuation, but closed cell is much more efficient as an insulator. If you can afford it, I would go with closed cell foam.

I’d probably run the electrical in conduits in the walls, with maybe some future planning in the form of terminated wiring in central locations that you could stick a breaker and outlet on later. Put 240V and 120V receptacles around and it should be a flexible enough setup to adapt to future needs. Definitely have a sizeable sub panel run to the shop.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3624 posts in 2077 days


#4 posted 10-22-2017 05:00 PM

Having been in on the building etc. of 3 different shops, here is my take on things.

The better insulation that you can put in is the best in the long run. Even foam under the siding and a good vapor barrier all help with the sound deadening too.
Put the electrical in the walls with MANY accessible junctions. Figure what you need for electrical then AT MINIMUM—DOUBLE IT! External wiring is a tremendous DUST COLLECTOR! Make sure you have some 220 volt outlets also. Again at least twice what you think that you need now. An extra $3-400 now can save a few GRAND; 3-4 years from now.

Another thing about the electrical outlets; put some switched ones in the ceiling—makes light location changes very easy. I first put outlets in the ceiling 30+ years ago and found it an excellent way to facilitate changes in many things; especially lighting.

Evergreen trees between the neighbor and you are also a good sound barrier.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

61 posts in 1601 days


#5 posted 10-22-2017 05:35 PM

I built you same size shop in 2010.

For insulation, I ended up doing vapor barrier and batts. Even though I am big proponent of closed cell spray foam, for me, it was a matter of time and monry. I could do the insulation for cheaper and on my own schedule. I am in Central Texas and run the HVAC system in the shop 24/7. So far, the electric bills have not been an issue.

For the electrical, I fell you pain. I did electrical in the walls. Not sure if it was the best choice.

Mark Spagnuolo (the Wood Whipser) posted a video on his new shop in CO. He did an interest thing with electrical where he had 2×120 plugs and a 240 plug at each electrical box. That way he could rearrange his tools without worrying.

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