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What is this tool? Egg hammer...

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Forum topic by mafe posted 02-10-2011 04:40 PM 3286 views 0 times favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mafe

9509 posts in 1741 days


02-10-2011 04:40 PM

Hi LJ’s

I bought some wonderful old tools in France.
Among these tools were a strange ‘hammer’!

The head are made of cast iron I belive, hard rusty and heavy.
The handle wood.

What are this tool?

The handle seems not too comfortable…

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.


45 replies so far

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mafe

9509 posts in 1741 days


#1 posted 02-10-2011 04:49 PM

It came with two af the axes heads here, the cisors and the drawknife.
If this can help?

The beautiful small axe head (Tomahawk), and the wonderful barrelmakers adze, I bought in a seperate buy.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Jack_T's profile

Jack_T

621 posts in 1683 days


#2 posted 02-10-2011 05:01 PM

Which end is the handle. If it is the cone it could be a hammer of sorts. If it is the oblong it could be a wood burner. Really good question.

-- Jack T, John 3:16 "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life."

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1767 days


#3 posted 02-10-2011 05:03 PM

some nice tools Mads .-)
are you trying to empty the market for drawknifes …LOL

my gess on the hammer , it most bee a sadistic Doktors knee reflex hammer :-O

say hello from us and enjoy your stay :-)
take care
Dennis

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mtnwild

3474 posts in 2179 days


#4 posted 02-10-2011 05:11 PM

Cool tools. Fun finds.

That egg hammer looks like it would be good for pounding copper sheet.

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3624 posts in 2386 days


#5 posted 02-10-2011 05:14 PM

I’ve seen hammers like that, used in conjunction with leather bags filled with sand or shot. As mtn suggests, they’re used together to pound curves in sheetmetal freehand.
Update: example: http://www.eastwood.com/ew-panelbeater-sandbag.html

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View MarcusM's profile

MarcusM

36 posts in 1633 days


#6 posted 02-10-2011 05:18 PM

Mads…I think it might be an old bossing hammer used in soft sheet metal work such as the old lead sheeting they used to use for roof flashings.

Regards, Mark

-- Tilbilly Mark

View Tuuek's profile

Tuuek

56 posts in 2083 days


#7 posted 02-10-2011 05:44 PM

I may not be a hammer at all. It could be a seed dibble but usually they are pretty solid to force down into the soil. Thats about all I can suggest.

-- Kelly -- Common Sense, Isn't Common to Everyone. - Me

View stefang's profile

stefang

13019 posts in 1986 days


#8 posted 02-10-2011 05:58 PM

Hi Mads. I see you are doing some shopping and finding good stuff. The handle doesn’t look like a handle to me. It’s cone shape looks more like a plug or as Kelly suggested maybe a seed dibber. Check out the link below. If you scroll down a bit, I think you agree its a dibber for planting seed.

http://www.oldgardentools.co.uk/Default.aspx?PageID=26

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View rance's profile

rance

4132 posts in 1812 days


#9 posted 02-10-2011 06:17 PM

Yeah, its an egg hammer all right. I have one just like it (but with no rust of course). I use it every morning to hammer my eggs for breakfast. Much better than those new fangled egg beaters.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1741 days


#10 posted 02-10-2011 06:26 PM

Hmmmmmm, I still have doubts, if a dibbler, then why such a thin shaft?
Keep them comming thank yoy,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4806 posts in 2534 days


#11 posted 02-10-2011 06:33 PM

My first thought was also a dibbler. Second thought too.

If it is a hammer, then why such a thin shaft?

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View swirt's profile

swirt

1945 posts in 1624 days


#12 posted 02-10-2011 06:40 PM

This is speculation only, but the cone shaped “handle” would not be a good hammmer handle. The taper faces the wrong way. If that is the handle it is shaped more for pushing along the axis. Or turning the round thing face down and using it like a pestle to grind something. Incidentally cone shaped handles like that are a great shape for file handles where you are pushing along the the long axis of the handle.

As Spalm says, something about the thin metal stem also doesn’t seem right for being a handle on a hammer.

How does the egg end feel when you put it in your hand and try to use it like a seed dibbler?

Any indication of how the egg or the cone is attached to the metal stem?

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1345 days


#13 posted 02-10-2011 07:01 PM

I was thinking of a cask-making bung hole tool. I tried to avoid typing “bunghole”, but it seemed unavoidable. Perhaps the handle is to ream the hole clean; the egg to drive the bung home. There’s just no escaping sounding vulgar in this post, is there.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1741 days


#14 posted 02-10-2011 07:19 PM

Hmmmmmmm

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1741 days


#15 posted 02-10-2011 07:25 PM

Dennis:
I’m waiting for these also now, they are payed and send to me in Paris.

So yes I do try to empty the marked… lol.
It is such a wonderful tool, and you need different types for different jobs, so this is why.
The latest bunch here are so I can hollow (the almost circular one), and the small one since I wished for a little handy size one. And the straight one will be rebuild into a different purpose, you will see in some weeks or so. And the reason I buy old? They are cheap here in France, really cheap, I paied probably less for then or so I have now, than the price is for one new in Denmark. And then you know I have a weakness for vintage…
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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