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Question on installing trim

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Forum topic by Dan posted 10-20-2017 08:09 PM 522 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


10-20-2017 08:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I was browsing around the internet and came across Steve Altman’s boxes. He is a gifted woodworker. He puts trim around the panels in some of his box lids.

Does anyone here know a proper procedure for doing this? Is it just glued to the carcass or what? I imagine the panel is stabilized but not the lid itself?

-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...


10 replies so far

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Rick_M

10456 posts in 2191 days


#1 posted 10-20-2017 08:20 PM

A picture or link to a box with the trim would help answer the question.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


#2 posted 10-20-2017 08:43 PM

This one for example.

https://images.custommade.com/KKUfqBNMGnDQlsB83_POWSL_1wY=/custommade-photosets/1020/1020.44882.jpg

looks like veneer on plywood and the trim is glued to lid itself but can’t really tell.

-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...

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Loren

9549 posts in 3459 days


#3 posted 10-20-2017 09:55 PM

I would call that a recessed panel door. Just
make a frame, glue it up and cut a rabbet
from the front with a router, square up the
corners and drop the panel in. The trim on
the front holds the panel in place. Sneak up
on the miter fit on the trim corners to get a
perfect fit. It can be glued or attached with
23 ga. pins. It’s fine to glue it to a plywood
panel but not a solid one.

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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


#4 posted 10-20-2017 11:51 PM

Thanks for helping out Loren. When you say front you mean top, correct. Would you glue the trim to both the panel and the lid?

So to do this on a box with the intrinsic lid, one could cut a rabbeted hole in the primary panel for secondary panel with trim, right? (or just a shallow mortice) I’m thinking this because it might not look good with the trim way out on the edge of the intrinsic lid, unless the box had really thick walls. Right?


I would call that a recessed panel door. Just
make a frame, glue it up and cut a rabbet
from the front with a router, square up the
corners and drop the panel in. The trim on
the front holds the panel in place. Sneak up
on the miter fit on the trim corners to get a
perfect fit. It can be glued or attached with
23 ga. pins. It s fine to glue it to a plywood
panel but not a solid one.

- Loren


-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...

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Loren

9549 posts in 3459 days


#5 posted 10-21-2017 12:05 AM

Glue it to both surfaces. Don’t glue it to
the front of a solid wood panel, as that would
interfere with wood movement. As long as
the panel is veneered, that shouldn’t be a
concern.

As long as you plan for wood movement you
can do whatever you like. In terms of what
looks good, that’s up to you.

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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


#6 posted 10-21-2017 12:22 AM

Yes, the wood movement question is what’s got me questioning this. In the picture above, it appears that Steve Altman has glued the TRIM to at least the solid wood lid. I can’t see well enough to tell if it’s glued to the veneered panel. But probably not, because as you say, on a box that big wood movement would be a problem.

So, I guess that probably answers my question. For now.

-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...

View madburg's profile

madburg

193 posts in 654 days


#7 posted 10-21-2017 12:43 AM

I think I would glue the moulding to the veneered panel, before fitting it into frame. Given the size of the box lid and the fact that the grain direction of the moulding and the lid frame are the same, the amount of wood movement I would expect to be minimal or almost none existent. Another way which might have been used to disguise a poorly fitting panel, would be to route a groove for the moulding along the joint line once the lid was finished and then glue the moulding into the groove…......

-- Madburg WA

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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


#8 posted 10-21-2017 01:00 AM

Okay, that’s interesting, because I’ve read other people saying the same thing. That movement would be insignificant. Funny you should mention disguising a poorly fitted panel with molding. One of the best boxes I’ve made has that “technique” applied to it. It’s been over three years and its still holding strong. Thanks madburg


I think I would glue the moulding to the veneered panel, before fitting it into frame. Given the size of the box lid and the fact that the grain direction of the moulding and the lid frame are the same, the amount of wood movement I would expect to be minimal or almost none existent. Another way which might have been used to disguise a poorly fitting panel, would be to route a groove for the moulding along the joint line once the lid was finished and then glue the moulding into the groove…......

- madburg


-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...

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SteveAltman

26 posts in 1903 days


#9 posted 10-29-2017 02:51 AM

Hi,

The lid for that box is a frame & panel. The panel is 3/16” Baltic birch ply veneered on both sides with book-matched spalted maple. The frame is made a standard way: Grooves in both the stiles and rails. The grooves on the stiles run through; there are stub tenons on the ends of the rails that fit the grooves. The panel is glued into the grooves – no need to worry about movement. If you look at the photo (hope it displays correctly) you’ll see the groove filled with the tenon next to the right “leg”.

The molding is Swiss pear, half-round at the top, mitered in. it’s glued to the panel and the frame. I use Ulmia spring clamps to hold them in place while the glue sets. You could use any suitable spring clamps (or chopped up bed springs, if you can still find them.) Just be careful not to dent the molding or scratch the frame.

Thanks for the kind words.

http://www.myworkshop.com/tester/Testing/Show2oblique300.jpg

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Dan

630 posts in 1703 days


#10 posted 10-29-2017 01:30 PM

Steve, thanks for explaining your process on this box. I didn’t realize you were a member here being that you posted one project back in 2012.

I would really enjoy seeing more of your beautiful work and some explanation of your processes would be really helpful, and needed!

Thanks again.

-- If I knew who it was and what they are doing perhaps I could defend myself...

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