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Forum topic by woodrookieII posted 02-10-2011 09:33 AM 2823 views 4 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodrookieII

243 posts in 2126 days


02-10-2011 09:33 AM

Hi,

This is my first post and it’s going to be a question. (surprise!!)

I’ve just completed a cherry side table stained with Michael’s 113 OCS.

I’m undecided about whether to finish it with Tung Oil or the Watco Danish Oil in Natural. It will be one or the other, and my experience has been primarily with Tung Oil.

Is there a real difference between the two?

If I decide to use the Danish, what application process have you all used successfully and what should I look out for?

Thanks,

rookie


28 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3285 days


#1 posted 02-10-2011 02:41 PM

Rookie, it is difficult to answer your question since “tung oil” and danish oil are terms that are really misused. If the label does not say pure tung oil then the product is largely a wiping varnish similar to danish oil. Here is a blog that was posted some time ago about tung oil. Basically, anything other than pure tung oil, can be a product that ranges from containing some tung oil as a minor component in addition to other oils to a product that only produces a finish similar to pure tung oil.

Watco danish oil is a product that contains raw linseed oil, vegetable oil and varnish in a solvent base similar to mineral spirits. I have used danish oil in the past and have gotten by with applying multiple coats in a relatively short time frame. In reality, though, this product has a long cure time due to the raw linseed oil (the vegetable oil will never cure). I would suggest 2 to 4 weeks to allow the linseed oil to cure, depending on your shop temperature.

As far as applying either of the products I would suggest putting them on as wiping varnishes and following the manufacturers directions.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3591 days


#2 posted 02-10-2011 03:04 PM

One more time:

The vegetable oil in popular so-called “Danish Oil” products is not salad dressing. It’s modified soya oil, which is a drying oil that will cure with time. :)

-- 温故知新

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2386 days


#3 posted 02-10-2011 03:12 PM

I have used both and find that I put the first coat on with a foam brush seems to work. The first coat soaks in therefore it seems to take more to start. I wipe this coat off after 10 or fifteen minutes(don’t forget to) after that I use a soft rag balled up to wipe consistently. Again wiping the excess after a few minutes. I usually let dry between coats at least 8 hours—24 is better.
Just my $.02

-- Life is good.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#4 posted 02-10-2011 03:57 PM

I second what Howie said.

Another good option, IMO, is boiled linseed oil (commonly referred to as BLO). You apply it the same way as Danish oil, but to me it seems to cure a little harder.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Wolffarmer's profile

Wolffarmer

407 posts in 2701 days


#5 posted 02-10-2011 04:03 PM

I have never used tung oil but have used Watco danish oil and Tried and True danish oil. I prefer the Tried and True. I apply it much as Howie said. Then if possible I put the project in an unused vehicle ( in the warmer months ) and let them cure a few days. Or a few weeks in the house. When i use to work for a computer company call center I loved to apply a coat of oil before work and head to work reeking of dainish oil. It felt good.

Randy

-- That was not wormy wood when I started working on it.

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woodrookieII

243 posts in 2126 days


#6 posted 02-10-2011 04:05 PM

Interesting.

Danish oil as a cologne.

But then again, you are a wolf farmer.

:)

....rookie

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woodrookieII

243 posts in 2126 days


#7 posted 02-10-2011 04:07 PM

Randy, I must ask.

When applying as a cologne…...do you use a cloth or 0000 steel wool?

.......rookie

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#8 posted 02-10-2011 04:17 PM

The best tool for application is a tall, leather-clad lady known as Mistress Helga. But I digress…

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Wolffarmer's profile

Wolffarmer

407 posts in 2701 days


#9 posted 02-10-2011 04:19 PM

LOL

I use T shirt type of rags. Steel wool makes me itchy
Randy

-- That was not wormy wood when I started working on it.

View Charles Maxwell's profile

Charles Maxwell

1081 posts in 3270 days


#10 posted 02-10-2011 04:30 PM

I’m building cabinet doors from cherry and I’ve used both oils in the finish. I stopped using tung on cherry and decided that watco danish oil is a better match for the cherry woods. It’s easier to apply, I use a lint free rag only. I found that tung oil is very labor intensive after 2-3 coats (steel wool rubbing). The watco oil also leaves a beautiful patina, if that’s your goal.That said, I’d put two scraps of cherry side-by-side and apply both oils and decide which works for the purpose.

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2514 days


#11 posted 02-10-2011 05:24 PM

If you’re not in a rush to get it done, I second the 2-scraps of cherry idea with the different finishes in-question. Make sure they’re also dyed first, just like your project, in order to get an accurate idea of what each “oil” will look like on your actual project (changing color, sheen, grain highlighting, etc.).

CharlieM and Randy… Hah! Funny!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View woodrookieII's profile

woodrookieII

243 posts in 2126 days


#12 posted 02-10-2011 07:54 PM

LOL…....I’ll need to check with the Mrs. on that Helga suggestion. :)

Now….back on topic (I hope).......

Scott, thanks for your insight on oils.

Charles and Jonathan, I’ve actually already got the scraps finished. Actually I used 1) Minwax Tung Oil, 2) Watco Danish Oil Natural, and 3) Minwax WipeOnPoly Satin. And I kinda like them all. I’m familiar with the use of 1 and 3, but I’ve heard some good things about 2 particularly with cherry

I’m leaning more and more to Danish. I’ve used 0000 steel wool in the past to apply Tung at coat 2 and above. Is this something suggested for Danish, or shall I just use a cloth for all coats?

Appreciate your inputs folks.

....rookie

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2514 days


#13 posted 02-10-2011 08:11 PM

I haven’t applied Danish Oil with steel wool, but have used it after a coat dries, but is not necessarily cured. Just make sure to vacuum, then use a good wiping of mineral spirits or naptha with a clean rag or paper towel after the steel wool to get all the little steel fibers that will be everywhere before applying your next coat of oil or topcoat. You can also wetsand your last coat of danish oil with 600+grit if you want a really smmoth surface, or have any minor defects you might want to fill in.

I need to correct my above post. I said to make sure you dyed them before trying the different oils. I should’ve said make sure to stain them to match the project piece before applying the different oils. Sorry for any confusion that might’ve created.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3186 posts in 2240 days


#14 posted 02-10-2011 08:36 PM

If you want a really nice look and high durability, this is what I do—

First coat with the minwax Tung oil finish – tung oil poly blend
Steel wool 0000 after about 24 hours, vacumn all the steel wool
wipe down with lint free cloth and mineral spirits
mix thoroghly satin oil based poly and then dilute 50% with mineral spirits and wipe on with a clean piece of cotton tee shirt material
let dry for at least 24 hours and do this three or four times.

Between poly coats wet sand with 600 grit the first time and 1000 grit after that – use water at first, mineral spirits after that

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2514 days


#15 posted 02-10-2011 08:40 PM

That sounds like a pretty solid finishing regimine David.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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