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Table dimensions for Wards TPC-2610 radial arm saw

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Forum topic by Jerry73071 posted 10-20-2017 12:23 PM 761 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry73071

2 posts in 189 days


10-20-2017 12:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tpc-2610 radial arm saw dimensions

I have a Wards TPC-2610 radial arm saw. It’s missing the the 3-piece table top and I need the dimensions, including mounting hole locations in the front piece (4 for attaching and 4 more for height adjusting screws), so I can fabricate a new one. I have owners guide, but that info isn’t in it.
Help would be greatly appreciated.


6 replies so far

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 175 days


#1 posted 01-05-2018 09:35 PM

Isn’t this something that can be created based on tracing the layout from the radial arm saw bed?

You’d be better served creating something that matches your exact saw, instead of making a table with a bolt pattern that someone else says should match your saw.

Post some pictures of what you have now, lets figure out how we can get you the information you need from the saw thats in your possession.

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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MrUnix

6610 posts in 2168 days


#2 posted 01-05-2018 09:56 PM

Completely non-critical and your table can be any size you like – unless you are shooting for a museum quality restoration. I had a RAS that I slapped a sheet of plywood on as a table and screwed a 2×4 down as the fence, and used it like that for over a decade.

Anyway, can’t help with the official MW size, but on both of my RAS’s, the table is 40” wide, and the three pieces are 16” (front), 7” and 4” deep. Screw holes can be marked from underneath once you put it in place. Tip: Put a 1/4” or 1/8” piece of sacrificial hardboard over the top of whatever table you use.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jerry73071

2 posts in 189 days


#3 posted 01-05-2018 09:56 PM

Thanks. Looks like I’ll have no alternative. It’s not as simple as it looks. Some of it will require educated guesses and possibly a bit of trial and error. If I can figure out numbers that work, I’ll post them for others.

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Knockonit

360 posts in 171 days


#4 posted 01-06-2018 03:14 AM



Thanks. Looks like I ll have no alternative. It s not as simple as it looks. Some of it will require educated guesses and possibly a bit of trial and error. If I can figure out numbers that work, I ll post them for others.

- Jerry73071

Aw welcome to American ingenuity, lol, pretty sure thats all i do is make educated and on most occassion, un educated guesses. good luck, nothing like exploring
Rj

View KTNC's profile

KTNC

48 posts in 225 days


#5 posted 01-06-2018 04:50 AM

I’m making a new table for my craftsman radial arm saw, so have been thinking about this too.

I found this video very helpful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1cc-_vPT0w It explains how the main table and the parts behind the fence can be set up.

The original main table on my RAS was 40 inches long by 15 1/2 inches deep. The main table I am making will be about 57 inches long by 24 inches deep and I plan on putting legs under it as necessary.

Dimension K: Set the edge near the back of the table in a position that
a. allows the blade to be spinning behind the fence and not contacting your work piece.
b. makes it so your in-rip scale reads zero when the blade is right at this edge
To set the front edge of the main table, I decided to make it as deep as possible so that I can stand in front of the saw and comfortably reach the handle to pull the saw forward for a crosscut. The standard table is quite a bit less deep than that and the blade actually hangs out over the end in the out-rip position.

Dimensions L & M: The combination of these two depths should be such that your fence is back as far as possible. You have some choice in how to subdivide that total distance. I’ve decided to set it up so that I can make the maximum possible crosscut on 3/4 inch material. In other words, when the fence is behind the main table and one of those other two pieces you can put a 3/4 inch thick board up against the fence and the blade will just clear the work piece. If you commonly cut thicker or thinner material, adjust accordingly.

Dimension A: That was 40 inches on my craftsman. I decided to make it as large as possible given the material I was using and allowing for me to comfortably do a ripping operation. You might need to size it to fit into your workspace. If it gets bigger, you will need to put legs under it to keep it from sagging.

Good luck, Kerry

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 175 days


#6 posted 01-08-2018 08:17 PM


Some of it will require educated guesses and possibly a bit of trial and error.

use kraft (or tracing) paper to transpose the layout on to your net top. no guess work required.

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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