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Forum topic by Reaper417 posted 10-19-2017 04:01 PM 643 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Reaper417

49 posts in 2394 days


10-19-2017 04:01 PM

Hey guys,

Just a quick question. I dip in danish oil. Can I pour the oil in a plastic container and cover it when not in use or does it have to go back in the metal container? Thanks in advance for the help….


11 replies so far

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2493 posts in 1994 days


#1 posted 10-19-2017 04:09 PM

I’ve stored it in plastic jars, I think the seal and air above it would be the concern. In fact, I store it in a plastic peanut jar with a foam brush in it as well.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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Rich

3668 posts in 738 days


#2 posted 10-19-2017 04:37 PM

If it’s not oxidizing, you’re OK. Regarding Rob’s valid concern about the seal and air, a shot of Bloxygen would help that. It’s inert and heavier than air, so it lays down on the surface of the liquid and blocks it from the damaging oxygen. I use it for all of my oil-based finishes, regardless of what container they’re stored in.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3797 days


#3 posted 10-19-2017 05:10 PM

Watco keeps a long time. I’ve never noticed
it going bad in the can, even when there’s
a lot of air in there.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3668 posts in 738 days


#4 posted 10-19-2017 05:45 PM


Watco keeps a long time. I ve never noticed
it going bad in the can, even when there s
a lot of air in there.

- Loren

If it’s oil, it oxidizes. Just because it hasn’t “gone bad” doesn’t mean it hasn’t deteriorated to some degree. At pennies per use, Bloxygen is a cheap way to ensure the finish stays as fresh as possible.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5072 posts in 4109 days


#5 posted 10-19-2017 07:07 PM

A really inexpensive way to store oil finishes is to exhale (your breath) several times into the container.
Remember that our “air” is mostly inert gases. Nitrogen is a big part of the exhalation.
Been doin’ that for years with no down side unless you’re gonna store the finish for a LONG time.
Just an old fart’s tip.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1870 posts in 2138 days


#6 posted 10-19-2017 07:48 PM

Propane also works. I keep a small torch in the shop and use it for a small shot into the container.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2493 posts in 1994 days


#7 posted 10-19-2017 09:27 PM



Watco keeps a long time. I ve never noticed
it going bad in the can, even when there s
a lot of air in there.

- Loren


I had a 1/2 full gallon can get pretty hard. it was the natural, so don’t know if that matters, along the same lines I bought 2 quart cans of the watco natural and they were much thicker than the Medium walnut I always use. The medium walnut is very thin, the natural was like polyurethane.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 924 days


#8 posted 10-19-2017 09:49 PM

Nitrogen is >70% of atmospheric air, and >70% of exhaled air. Oxygen is about 20% of atmospheric air, and about 15% of exhaled air.

Couple that with how uncontrolled “delivery” is (unless you’re mocking up a straw and exhaust port), and its safe to assume that exhaling into a can has a very limited impact.

Realistically, if you’re sealing a can after use there’s only so much oxygen in there to spoil the contents (think in terms of mass, not volume), so you won’t see massive degradation unless its open for a long time or there’s a large air:finish ratio. You can mitigate this by transfering to smaller containers.


A really inexpensive way to store oil finishes is to exhale (your breath) several times into the container.
Remember that our “air” is mostly inert gases. Nitrogen is a big part of the exhalation.
Been doin that for years with no down side unless you re gonna store the finish for a LONG time.
Just an old fart s tip.
Bill
- Bill White

View Reaper417's profile

Reaper417

49 posts in 2394 days


#9 posted 10-20-2017 05:04 AM

Thanks everyone for the help. I’m thinking maybe I just better store it in the can. Don’t use it alll the time so maybe I’m better off. Dave

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3532 posts in 2137 days


#10 posted 10-20-2017 11:11 AM

Just a thought…be careful of what you store finishes in and where you store them. Overtime, some containers will fail and spill finish over your tools. I had a can of shellac leak and a huge mess.

View RRBOU's profile

RRBOU

176 posts in 2441 days


#11 posted 10-20-2017 11:23 AM



Nitrogen is >70% of atmospheric air, and >70% of exhaled air. Oxygen is about 20% of atmospheric air, and about 15% of exhaled air.

Couple that with how uncontrolled “delivery” is (unless you re mocking up a straw and exhaust port), and its safe to assume that exhaling into a can has a very limited impact.

Realistically, if you re sealing a can after use there s only so much oxygen in there to spoil the contents (think in terms of mass, not volume), so you won t see massive degradation unless its open for a long time or there s a large air:finish ratio. You can mitigate this by transfering to smaller containers.

A really inexpensive way to store oil finishes is to exhale (your breath) several times into the container.
Remember that our “air” is mostly inert gases. Nitrogen is a big part of the exhalation.
Been doin that for years with no down side unless you re gonna store the finish for a LONG time.
Just an old fart s tip.
Bill
- Bill White

- gargey

+1

That is how CPR works

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

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