LumberJocks

TS blade removal

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by guyos posted 1259 days ago 920 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View guyos's profile

guyos

9 posts in 2624 days


1259 days ago

Hi folks

Can someone tell me which way the nut comes off the table saw shaft? clockwise or anticlockwise?
I nees to change my blade, it is only an old sip cheapie saw.

Guyos

-- guyos


14 replies so far

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1645 days


#1 posted 1259 days ago

Towards you, or counterclockwise is what I believe kkickback was trying to say.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 1259 days ago

Most saws have right hand threads, so you would turn the wrench towards you when you’re standing at the front of the saw.

If you don’t have a two wrench setup, you may need to use a block of wood between the throat and a blade tooth while you break the nut loose. Some folks feel that they really need to wrench down an arbor nut and they can get hard to get off. When you put it back make it tight, but don’t feel that you need to torque it to death.

It’s possible(but not likely) that you have an arbor with a left hand thread. A look at the threads at the end of the arbor should tell you which you have.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1645 days


#3 posted 1259 days ago

It might be overkill in some people’s eyes, but I also unplug my tablesaw when I’m changing the blade, especially if I’m holding the blade when loosening or tightening the nut, which is the way I normally do it, rather than using a block of wood, or some other apparatus. I also wear a leather glove while gripping the blade.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15638 posts in 2813 days


#4 posted 1259 days ago

Jonathan, that’s not overkill…. that’s just good safety practice.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1645 days


#5 posted 1259 days ago

I’ve had one run-in with a tablesaw lately, and believe me, you do not want to be on the receiving end of the blade!

My encounter was unrelated to changing the blade, doing something I shouldn’t have been doing, or rather, should’ve done a different way.

I have always changed the blade out the way I described above though.

I’m glad you agree Charlie. Now, no matter what, I will always be thinking ahead of time, “is this the safest way to perform this task?” That, and listening to the little voice in the back of my head.

Safety first! (Please take my word for it.)

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Tony Strupulis's profile

Tony Strupulis

240 posts in 1718 days


#6 posted 1259 days ago

Left hand threads. Righty-loosey, lefty-tighty.

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

View guyos's profile

guyos

9 posts in 2624 days


#7 posted 1259 days ago

Thanks for the replies, I will wedge the blade with a block of ood and try again.

guyos

-- guyos

View wb8nbs's profile

wb8nbs

136 posts in 1287 days


#8 posted 1259 days ago

My old Craftsman has half inch right handed threads FWIW. I have heard some are left hand. You should be able to suss it out by raising the blade and examining the threads on the arbor.

-- The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1862 days


#9 posted 1258 days ago

i think it depends if its left tilt or right tilt. mines a left tilt and its righty tighty lefty loosey

View BobG's profile

BobG

172 posts in 1556 days


#10 posted 1258 days ago

I can’t imagine a nut on a table saw working in reverse of the blade direction?? There are motors that run forward or reverse but, I have never seen a table saw set up that way.

-- BobG, Lowell, Arkansas--------My goal in life is to be the kind of person my dog thinks I am! Make more saw dust!!

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1775 days


#11 posted 1258 days ago

You only need to snug the nut back on. I hold the blade with a towel and snug it and can use the same towel to hold the blade and remove the nut. You shouldn’t need to wedge a block of wood in there every time.

Doesn’t matter which tilt it is, if the blade is turning toward you then the nut will loosen by pulling toward you.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2373 posts in 2122 days


#12 posted 1258 days ago

The way that I remember the direction is that to remove the nut, I turn in in the direction that the blade rotates when cutting. So, on a left-tilt table saw, this will be CCW. On a right-tilt table saw, this will be CW, since the blade is mounted on the other side of the arbor. I have an older Dewalt RAS, and the rule still applies – it is CW to loosen.

Maybe there are exceptions somewhere.

-- “That it will never come again / Is what makes life so sweet. ” ― Emily Dickinson

View mstenner's profile

mstenner

57 posts in 1749 days


#13 posted 1258 days ago

Wow, you guys really know how to make this confusing.

To loosen the nut, stand in front of the saw, put the wrench on the nut, and pull it toward you.

They all work this way so that any time the blade begins to spin on the arbor during operation, it will tighten the nut rather than loosen it.

-- -Michael

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1645 days


#14 posted 1258 days ago

Michael, directly above, hit the nail on the head about why the nut spins the way it does regarding the arbor rotation.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase