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Forum topic by Chris Cook posted 10-19-2017 01:30 AM 759 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris Cook

291 posts in 2096 days


10-19-2017 01:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: advice question finishing

I need some advice from those in the know:

I am attaching these walnut pieces on top of this box lid. (I probably should have done inlay, but it’s too late now)

My Plan A is to glue these walnut pieces down and then finish with tung oil. I am wondering if there is a better plan?

(1)
The tails in particular are quite thin and I am concerned about how to glue them down adequately yet not get glue all over the top for which I can’t get back off.

Any tips on how to glue these tails down?

(2)
I plan to finish this in tung oil as I have done many projects. Finishing with this type of intricate detail on top poses some issues with build up in the tiny recesses.

I am wondering if there is a technique where I could finish (or partially finish) the box top and parts prior to attaching them?

If so, what type of glue?
Glue onto the finished top?
How to attach?

Any insight is much appreciated!!

CC

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""


19 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3550 posts in 2124 days


#1 posted 10-19-2017 01:49 AM

Never done this but I’m thinking cover the top with masking tape. Set the pieces in place and run a exacto knife around the pieces and remove the tape where the pieces go and glue then down.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

527 posts in 418 days


#2 posted 10-19-2017 02:20 AM


Never done this but I m thinking cover the top with masking tape. Set the pieces in place and run a exacto knife around the pieces and remove the tape where the pieces go and glue then down.

- AlaskaGuy


Good idea.

Disclaimer: I’m not an expert.

I’d attach the tails first with titebond and let them set up with a flat board on top with some weight, then go back and add the other pieces in stages. I bet that a thin coat of glue on the tail pieces would give you very little squeeze out that could be removed with a sharp chisel after letting it set up for a while before it drys completely especially if you use AlaskaGuys masking tape idea. The tails are the main concern. Cut a practice tail and try it on some scrap.

The other pieces are big enough to just keep the glue away from the edges to avoid squeeze out. Then just apply the Tung oil in very thin coats that are wiped well after application. Shouldn’t be a problem, especially if you do detailed inlay work.

Here's another technique to remove squeeze out with a tapered straw.

-- Andybb

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7746 posts in 2613 days


#3 posted 10-19-2017 03:40 AM

Hide glue, either hot or liquid is easily cleaned up with water. That would solve the squeeze out problem but not the oil build-up problem. The masking idea (AlaskaGuy) would likely work for that part.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8151 posts in 1301 days


#4 posted 10-19-2017 03:43 AM

I would’ve used alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1881 posts in 404 days


#5 posted 10-19-2017 05:05 AM



I would ve used alder.

- TheFridge

+1

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9560 posts in 3463 days


#6 posted 10-19-2017 05:48 AM

I agree hide glue could get you out of this
situation. It is easier to clean up squeeze
out than other glues I have used.

Clamping the parts down can be accomplished
with go-bars. Google “go bar deck” for details.

I would shoot them with 23 ga. pins if the work
could tolerate a little hole filling.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1440 posts in 1202 days


#7 posted 10-19-2017 11:56 AM

+1 on using hide glue. Unlike regular wood glues, you can get it off with warm water, though cleaning the glue out of tight spaces can be a pain regardless so use as little glue as possible to minimize the squeeze out. To clamp it just put some weight on it. If you use hot hide glue, you might not have to clamp at all because it starts to hold within a minute or two with just “finger clamping” as soon as it cools down a bit. Checkout Shipwright’s blogs on hot hide blue. Pretty amazing stuff.

As for finishing, if you wipe on the oil with a rag, you can put on multiple light coats so you can avoid the build up issues. You might need to use something small to push the rag into tight corners but that is better than applying with a brush and getting pools of oil in those corners.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

637 posts in 1034 days


#8 posted 10-19-2017 02:14 PM

these are my latest completed scrollsaw projects. theres quite a bit of glueing down of pieces on em. heres how ive been doing it for years with great results.

http://www.bsi-inc.com/hobby/insta_cure_plus.html

a couple dabs around the perimeter- far enough in that it wont squeeze out, then press in place for a minute or 2. i like to clamp the pieces in place for 5 or so minutes, but sometimes have to use weights- i dont have clamps that can reach for parts closer to the middles.

ive been doing it this way for many years. along with the scrollsaw work, kve done it on a couple dollhouses that get used a lot, some toy chests, and other kids toys and the parts stay on great

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

637 posts in 1034 days


#9 posted 10-19-2017 02:18 PM

p.s.
if the buildup you mention is referring to buildup of the tung oil, a simple solution is to use some compressed air to blow the tung oil out of the crevices. a rag over the are and blow some air into it. not massive pressure,though. 50psi ish seems to work for me when i use BLO.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

202 posts in 893 days


#10 posted 10-19-2017 02:40 PM

Apply CA glue to the pieces and spray CA activator on base. Apply in the exact position and apply a couple of seconds pressure. No squeeze out, no worry about slippage. Case solved!

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

647 posts in 631 days


#11 posted 10-19-2017 05:15 PM

Jack gets the gold star for best idea in my ranking system.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

291 posts in 2096 days


#12 posted 10-19-2017 08:03 PM

Folks! Thank you for your many responses. I think I will go into the shop and experiment with each of your suggestions and see what works best for me.

A few questions:

@Alaskan, I like your idea and I support global warming (AKA greenhouse effect, ozone hole, climate change)

@Jack

For CA glue and zipkicker, I have used these a while back when I was doing R/C Planes. How is the longevity of this type of bond? Good I guess?

@TheFirdge. I have tried to use alder as a bonding agent and I am afraid it just doesn’t last.

@shiprightI have yet to use hide glue, maybe it’s time

@loren I am actually planning a go-bar setup soon anyway.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View pontic's profile

pontic

479 posts in 423 days


#13 posted 10-19-2017 08:17 PM

CA is durable enough for this kind of job. They now have a UV activated system that works very well in situations like this.
If you want to use PVA do what Alaska guy suggests or pin the tails in with strait pins.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View jbay's profile

jbay

1798 posts in 714 days


#14 posted 10-19-2017 08:40 PM

CA is durable enough for this kind of job. They now have a UV activated system that works very well in situations like this. If you want to use PVA do what Alaska guy suggests or pin the tails in with strait pins.

- pontic

Quite interested in this. How does the UV light penetrate the wood material to cure it?

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

291 posts in 2096 days


#15 posted 10-19-2017 09:06 PM


CA is durable enough for this kind of job. They now have a UV activated system that works very well in situations like this. If you want to use PVA do what Alaska guy suggests or pin the tails in with strait pins.

- pontic

Quite interested in this. How does the UV light penetrate the wood material to cure it?

- jbay

I actually have some of the UV curable glue, but I am unsure of it’s curing potential in hidden areas and it’s longevity. Guess I can test that too!

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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