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Polishing / Buffing

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Forum topic by Mark posted 10-18-2017 06:09 PM 693 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Mark's profile

Mark

861 posts in 1790 days


10-18-2017 06:09 PM

Morning all. Has anyone tried using automobile cut wax ( the stuff you use on faded car paint) as a polishing / buffing compound?
Thanks.

-- Mark


11 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

185 posts in 435 days


#1 posted 10-18-2017 06:13 PM

Not sure about cut wax, but I have used rubbing and polishing compounds on shellac with success.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4788 posts in 3776 days


#2 posted 10-18-2017 07:30 PM

Not to sound like a minimalist but, I just use the green chromium oxide for most buffing jobs.
Some might need Tripoli for really tough projects, and white for really fine polishing.
What are ya tryin’ to do?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19622 posts in 2921 days


#3 posted 10-19-2017 02:15 AM

I have not used that product, but when buffing, I like to start with Tripoli to get the wood up the a sheen of about 1800 from a 400 sanded surface. Then white Diamond and then wax the Tripoli does the fine cutting like sanding. I don’t know if that cut wax brings up the sheen like Tripoli but if it polishes dull paint, it might. Give it a go and report back!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Druid's profile

Druid

1631 posts in 2611 days


#4 posted 10-19-2017 07:29 AM

Hi Mark, I’m as curious as Bill. What are you trying to polish? Metal? A finish on wood? Your motorcycle?
If it’s a metal surface, I would suggest considering the Flexcut Gold Polishing Compound that I mention in one of my Blogs at . . . http://lumberjocks.com/Druid/blog/94298

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4385 posts in 2020 days


#5 posted 10-19-2017 10:26 AM

OK test time, I have enough materials to do a test, and I am curious as as well to the results.

Looking in my auto polishing box of goodies I see two colour (correct spelling BTW) restoration products which should be suitable.

Looking in my sanding and polishing box of goodies I see a wheel and polishing compound which I know will be suitable.

Ready?... here we go!

The Test Block:

a piece of Red Ironbark sanded to 800G

Why red ironbark? well if you held a magnet near this timber its the closest to ferous metal your going to get.
Plus its known for responding to polishing, and I assume as its a woodworking site your using wood.

Test 1 The “car Polish”

Rubbing in circular motions using a lint free cloth untill all the polish has been used and then waiting for the polish to dry buffed it off.

Test 2 The wood polishing gear
Using a power wheel and compound hit the wood in no particular process.

The results:

Looking at the left hand side you see some effect along with white polish contamination thats the test 1 area
Looking at the right hand side you see again some effect with no compound residue remaining.

A close up of test 2

Conclusion.

Sadly the test results are a little inconclusive as to the benefits of using car polish on wood, so I guess the car kit remains as a car kit.

That should get some sparks flying!!

-- Regards Robert

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1397 posts in 1805 days


#6 posted 10-19-2017 12:06 PM

I have used Meguiars car paint polishing compounds for years on all types of film wood finishes – lacquer, shellac, CA glue, poly, oil and wb. Works great. As for bare wood, no. Perhaps something like ebony one would polish, but the majority of wood types one would want something to polish, i.e. a film finish. Otherwise, just use wax,

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

638 posts in 1035 days


#7 posted 10-19-2017 02:00 PM



I have used Meguiars car paint polishing compounds for years on all types of film wood finishes – lacquer, shellac, CA glue, poly, oil and wb. Works great. As for bare wood, no. Perhaps something like ebony one would polish, but the majority of wood types one would want something to polish, i.e. a film finish. Otherwise, just use wax,

- OSU55

ive used megs m105 and 205 for auto paint correction for years. with those 2, seems like if it was used on wood without a film the compound would get into the pores and look like crud.

View ClammyBallz's profile

ClammyBallz

424 posts in 952 days


#8 posted 10-19-2017 07:37 PM

Polish was designed to smooth out the clear coat, without a clear coat, you’re wasting your time.
As mentioned, Meguiars 105 & 205 work well which can be followed up with some Johnson’s paste wax. Another one I like to use is Menzerna (now Jescar) Power Lock which is a synthetic sealant. And consider using a DA polisher, it will give you a uniform shine.

View Mark's profile

Mark

861 posts in 1790 days


#9 posted 10-19-2017 11:18 PM

Sorry folks, I should of specified. i”ve done several wood turnings, finished with water born aniline dye and Minwax Gloss poly. After sandingg to 600G and a final coat of poly, i’ve polished with the old paper bag thing. While that knocks off the knibs, it aim’g perfect. I don’t have a buffing wheel, though I think that’s the answer, I was wondering if the cut wax might serve the purpose.

-- Mark

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

293 posts in 701 days


#10 posted 10-19-2017 11:55 PM

Get some wet/dry paper in 800, 1200 and 2000 grit. Then wax and buff with a microfiber towel. Put on your sunglasses toward the end to save your retinas… 8^)

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1397 posts in 1805 days


#11 posted 10-21-2017 12:34 PM

I use the Meguiars for turnings when I want bright gloss. I do most of my finish steps on the lathe and let the lathe do the spinning. The abrasive wax will buff it from there, but the higher in grit you go the fewer polished scratches will be visible.

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