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Can I soften cured CA glue?

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Forum topic by newwoodbutcher posted 10-16-2017 10:33 PM 507 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newwoodbutcher

701 posts in 2662 days


10-16-2017 10:33 PM

It is my practice, not sure why, to put a few drops of CA glue in the screw holes for hinges and other hardware on final assembly. Not sure if someone recommended it or if it’s my own idea. My thinking is that it helps protect the wood from the cutting action of the screw threads over time preventing them from loosening. Anyway, I have several brass hinges with brass screws installed this way. I now need to remove what I thought was final assembly to facilitate improved hinge performance and I’m afraid I’m going to strip the heads. Is there any trick or technique to soften the glue? Heat? Solvent? Any thing? Does anyone else use CA glue like this?

-- Ken


12 replies so far

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William Shelley

466 posts in 1281 days


#1 posted 10-16-2017 10:39 PM

CA glue has almost zero shear strength. A cordless drill should have no problem breaking the screw away from the glue.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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Loren

9553 posts in 3460 days


#2 posted 10-16-2017 10:42 PM

Dunno.

You can sharpen a screwdriver to get the
optimum grip though. I confess I have
never done it. A lot of old furniture used
those brass slot-head screws and I imagine
old time artisans were proficient in tuning
screwdrivers.

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jonah

1375 posts in 3111 days


#3 posted 10-16-2017 11:31 PM

Slot head screws are an abomination. Why everything didn’t go square drive twenty or thirty years ago is beyond me.

Not really related to the OP, just thought I’d mention it.

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Sprung

93 posts in 1528 days


#4 posted 10-16-2017 11:39 PM

Agreed with the above comment about the lack of shear strength in CA. I would use a well tuned screwdriver and a good grip on the handle to try and loosen it. Since the screws are brass, and thus softer than steel, things could go from bad to worse in a hurry with a cordless drill.

You can us a CA debonder or Acetone to soften CA, but with the CA being in the hole with the screw and past the hinge, I imagine that getting debonder or acetone down in there would be a challenge.

-- Matt, SW MN, https://www.facebook.com/anewcreationwoodworks

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clin

739 posts in 808 days


#5 posted 10-16-2017 11:47 PM

Acetone will soften CA. Not sure how effectively you can get it in there or if it would negatively affect the wood.

If they are small brass screws, I’d be worried you’ll snap the heads off.

In the future, I would NOT glue these in. I do use CA glue for machine threads in wood. Drill, tap, flood the thread with thin CA (thin CA is like water). Then re-tap. But this is for machine type screws, that may be loosened or removed often. It is not meant to glue anything, but rather as a way to harden the threads.

To hold in a wood screw, I’ve occasionally used a drop of white or yellow glue. Vibrations will work screws loose. But a little extra something like a drop of white glue should be enough to keep that from happening. But those glues don’;t stick to metal very well, so pretty easy to break loose when needed.

-- Clin

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ArtMann

645 posts in 628 days


#6 posted 10-17-2017 12:35 AM

You might take not of the fact that nobody else mentions putting glue into an unused screw hole.

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Andybb

523 posts in 416 days


#7 posted 10-17-2017 01:10 AM

An old mechanic’s trick for grip on a screw head. A little valve grinding compound on the tip pf the screw driver.

But +1 on the lack of sheer strength of CA. Might not be a big deal.

-- Andybb

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newwoodbutcher

701 posts in 2662 days


#8 posted 10-17-2017 01:15 AM

Thank you all, this is a great site with fantastic and helpful members. Yep a well tuned screwdriver and they broke free without a complaint. So…. no one else does this? Hmmm. My thinking was not so much that the glue bonded to the screw so much as the glue hardened the wood surrounding the threaded hole and minimized the hole shrinking and expanding with humidity changes which limited the threads cutting/loosening the hole. I guess I kinda thought everyone did this. Guess I won’t do that any more. Thank you all again

-- Ken

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Notw

589 posts in 1565 days


#9 posted 10-17-2017 02:35 PM

Acetone works great, found this out the hard way when I used CA glue one time to finish a pen and glued my fingers together. Wife laughed the entire time as she watched me panic

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bondogaposis

4428 posts in 2163 days


#10 posted 10-17-2017 03:22 PM

The trick is to run a screw in the hole then back it out, then apply CA glue to the empty hole and let it cure. Thin CA glue is best for this. This hardens and stabilizes the wood around the screw hole. Once the glue cures then run the screws back in for final assembly.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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bonesbr549

1439 posts in 2879 days


#11 posted 10-17-2017 03:29 PM



You might take not of the fact that nobody else mentions putting glue into an unused screw hole.

- ArtMann

That is a recomended practice if you are wanting to put fasteners into MDF. Used it many a time. Not seeing it in hardwood or the need. If the hole is reamed out, I shove toothpicks with wood glue in there.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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OSU55

1393 posts in 1802 days


#12 posted 10-17-2017 08:38 PM



The trick is to run a screw in the hole then back it out, then apply CA glue to the empty hole and let it cure. Thin CA glue is best for this. This hardens and stabilizes the wood around the screw hole. Once the glue cures then run the screws back in for final assembly.

- bondogaposis

I’ve used this method with CA, shellac, poly, wood glue. Works very well.

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