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Making SAW STOP Table Saw Inserts

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Forum topic by groland posted 10-16-2017 06:19 PM 566 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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groland

181 posts in 3224 days


10-16-2017 06:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: making saw stop table saw inserts

There was an article on making Saw Stop table saw inserts with good-looking, measured drawings in, I believe, “Fine Woodworking” magazine. I know I have the issue somewhere, but I cannot locate it.
I write to ask if anyone remembers what issue it was in?

If any of you have made these inserts, I would like to hear how they worked for you.

I have a bunch of scrap 1/2 inch baltic birch plywood I think would do well for this application. Any thoughts?

Thanks,

George


8 replies so far

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bbasiaga

991 posts in 1807 days


#1 posted 10-16-2017 06:22 PM

Following as I would like to do this for my saw as well.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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groland

181 posts in 3224 days


#2 posted 10-19-2017 05:14 PM

No one responded to my inquiry so far, but happily, I have located the issue and will post the answer here for others’ information. The article is “Shopmade Table Saw Inserts” by Bob Van Dyke. It is in Fine Woodworking, 251, “Tools and Shops” issue, Winter 2016, pp. 58-61.

I am working out a blank now made of 1/2 inch birch plywood. I found it useful to take the set-screws out of the manufacturer’s throat plate and fit a drill bit into them until I found one that was snug. I used that to mark center points to drill the needed holes in the correct locations. I was able to find all the hardware I needed except the rearward under-plate adjusting screws which I ordered from Saw Stop.

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pintodeluxe

5421 posts in 2625 days


#3 posted 10-19-2017 05:37 PM

I used to make inserts for my Jet contractor saw, but with my Sawstop cabinet saw I use the factory inserts. I’m not willing to give up the safety lock-down feature they offer.

I had an experience where an oak board released tension as it was ripped on the tablesaw. To release the binding blade I tilted the board up and away from the saw (right or wrong that’s what I did) and the whole insert lifted up with the board! I had a MicroJig splitter on the insert and it was pinched in the kerf. It was a miracle it didn’t hit the blade and come at me like shrapnel.

Since switching to the Sawstop with riving knife and factory inserts I have had zero issues.
I only use two inserts… one for standard blades, and one for a 3/4” dado stack. I found smaller dado stacks cut cleanly with the 3/4” dado insert because it is still zero clearance on the left of the insert. That is the side that matters if you’re cutting tenons for instance, on the left side of the blade.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Carloz

866 posts in 403 days


#4 posted 10-19-2017 07:05 PM

Since switching to the Sawstop with riving knife and factory inserts I have had zero issues.
I only use two inserts… one for standard blades, and one for a 3/4” dado stack. I found smaller dado stacks cut cleanly with the 3/4” dado insert because it is still zero clearance on the left of the insert. That is the side that matters if you re cutting tenons for instance, on the left side of the blade.

- pintodeluxe


What if you are cutting a dado (that is what dado blade is for) or any kind of slot ? Or even a tenon on a long piece that because of length has to be set on the longer side of the saw (right one)

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bbasiaga

991 posts in 1807 days


#5 posted 10-19-2017 08:27 PM


Since switching to the Sawstop with riving knife and factory inserts I have had zero issues.
I only use two inserts… one for standard blades, and one for a 3/4” dado stack. I found smaller dado stacks cut cleanly with the 3/4” dado insert because it is still zero clearance on the left of the insert. That is the side that matters if you re cutting tenons for instance, on the left side of the blade.

- pintodeluxe

What if you are cutting a dado (that is what dado blade is for) or any kind of slot ? Or even a tenon on a long piece that because of length has to be set on the longer side of the saw (right one)

- Carloz

I have noted little difference as well. I have the Dewalt dado set and it seems to do a decent job without a full zero clearance. Material makes a big difference too. Some ply will tear out no matter what you do. You can also put some tape over the area where the joint will be cut, and that helps too.

I’m sure a zero clearance for each exact dado width is ideal, but if buying inserts at 40 bucks each isn’t an option for you then there all alternatives that can work.

I will have to try making one of my own for the Dado set. See how it goes. Would be a lot cheaper and maybe better than the tape.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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groland

181 posts in 3224 days


#6 posted 10-21-2017 01:53 PM

“Since switching to the Sawstop with riving knife and factory inserts I have had zero issues.
I only use two inserts… one for standard blades, and one for a 3/4” dado stack. I found smaller dado stacks cut cleanly with the 3/4” dado insert because it is still zero clearance on the left of the insert. That is the side that matters if you re cutting tenons for instance, on the left side of the blade.”

Your experience with a lifting insert sounds like a harrowing experience one would not want to repeat. However, I think there is a work-around for this problem. I have partially tried this, but will have to research it further. I will outline my plan below. I should mention that I am solely concerned with inserts for dados. My plan is to make one for each width of dado I use so to arrive at a set of zero-clearance inserts for all dado operations.

Ideally, we need two conditions met. One is that the insert be flush with the table top; the other is that it be secured there so it resists being pulled up during cutting operations.

The outfeed-underside of the insert has bolt heads that slide under bolt heads on the saw’s table. These prevent the outfeed side from pulling upward and allow levelling the insert plate with the table. On the infeed-underside of the throat plate are two screws, adjustable from the top side, that bring up the insert to level with the table and support it. It only remains to secure the infeed-end of the insert. There is a threaded hole recessed into the table that takes a machine bolt. I drilled this out of my wooden insert, countersunk it and can attach a machine bolt through the top of the insert to hold the insert down. Both ends of the insert are fastened. If that machine bolt draws the infeed end of the insert below the table, one can insert a second machine bolt into underside of the insert, adjust it to support the infeed side of the insert level with the table, then the countersunk machine bolt prevents the insert from lifting up.

As I said, I have not implemented this fully, but in theory, it ought to cover all the safety and functionality features in question.

I shall report fully on this as soon as the bolts arrive from Saw Stop and I have a chance to work further on this project.

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bonesbr549

1439 posts in 2879 days


#7 posted 10-21-2017 01:59 PM

As others indicated, I too once switched, toyed with making one, but to be honest, wanted that lock down.

When I bought my ICS, I got a dado version just for that purpose. Not needed anything since.

they do make a steel one that has inserts that can be swapped out. Not cheap but looks real good. But like I said my blades are good so Not an issue.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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RDan

44 posts in 2136 days


#8 posted 10-21-2017 03:32 PM

I bought the infinity Sawstop insert. I really like it since I can change out my inserts by the blade I a using. I do like the locking feature on the regular insert though. So I may dedicate that one to a single blade or dado blade. Dan

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