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Dust Collection Vertical Considerations

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Forum topic by Tyler Moseley posted 02-07-2011 08:02 PM 965 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tyler Moseley

48 posts in 1538 days


02-07-2011 08:02 PM

I can’t find very much info on this topic.

I have a cheap HF dust collector and basically all of my tools except the Table saw along one wall.

By my way of thinking, you would achieve the maximum amount of suction at each tool by running the pipe along the ground at about the same level as the motor and impeller housing, which works well for my layout, however seeing everyone else with a similar setup running theirs along the ceiling or just above counter height makes me think I might be missing something. It would be equally easy for me to run ceiling, counter or floor level setups so I would like to go with the best way.

The only thing I can think is maybe larger chips would not be sucked upward to the ceiling before it reaches the impeller. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

-- Measure Twice, cut two, three times, plane, join, sand, coat, sand, coat, sand, coat, buff, wax, polish, brag. It's a process.


5 replies so far

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1633 days


#1 posted 02-07-2011 08:47 PM

Your right when you say the longer chips may have trouble being sucked up to ceiling level. With a smaller dust collector you just want to have the least amount of travel from the tool to the DC. Running the hose or pipes mid wall is probably the best way to go because many tools are at that level. I would also put the DC closest to the biggest dust makers so that they have the least amount of travel time.

Also having the pipes/hoses mid level makes it easier to access if you get a clogged hose.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1926 days


#2 posted 02-07-2011 08:49 PM

Yup.

I’d guess that … the only reason that people ceiling mount their ductwork is that … they don’t have any other good options.

It takes some CFM to lift the chips. If you don’t need to spend it on lifting, then you have more CFM to spend on pulling.

-- -- Neil

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2699 days


#3 posted 02-07-2011 10:26 PM

I worked in a shop that had 14 foot ceilings. We had clog after clog with the lift sections of the system.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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Tyler Moseley

48 posts in 1538 days


#4 posted 02-08-2011 01:42 AM

Cool, That’s kind of what i suspected.I will probably run it on the floor since everything is mobile and can roll out of the way for repairs and it will be the most out of the way. Probably just put the blast gates as close to the tool as possible to avoid bending over all the time.

Thanks for all the help.

-- Measure Twice, cut two, three times, plane, join, sand, coat, sand, coat, sand, coat, buff, wax, polish, brag. It's a process.

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

131 posts in 819 days


#5 posted 10-04-2012 11:01 AM

Kind of late to this and, for whatever it may be worth, I have a similar set up. Only difference is I have my machines arranged down two opposing walls and the pipe run from each side and 90deg to the dc in the center.

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