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Forum topic by Archer72 posted 10-16-2017 03:28 PM 893 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Archer72

37 posts in 51 days


10-16-2017 03:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

So I have a question for the community, and need some help with an issue with resawing. I am working with hard woods, and as you know they usually come in 4/4 and above, which in a way is kind of nice. However the issue is a lot of my projects call for 3/4, 1/2, or even 1/4 in thickness which requires me to resaw the wood to get to the thickness I need. I dont have a planer and even if I did would probably resaw anyways as planing down to 1/2 in from 4/4 is a loss of a lot of material.

Now the issue. When I resaw a piece of wood now, I get a bevel or hump in almost dead center of the wood and it is noticeable to the naked eye, no need to measure for it. So I have to either plane it down with a block plane (all I have) or sand it down with a hand held sander. Working on getting a belt sander.

Anyways my question is, is there something I am missing, possible table is out of alignment?, or something like that, any help I can get on this would greatly help.

Thank you

-- Archer


19 replies so far

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Loren

9547 posts in 3458 days


#1 posted 10-16-2017 03:37 PM

What tool are you resawing with?

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Carloz

858 posts in 402 days


#2 posted 10-16-2017 03:46 PM


usually come in 4/4 and above, which in a way is kind of nice. However the issue is a lot of my projects call for 3/4, 1/2, or even 1/4 in thickness which requires me to resaw the wood to get to the thickness I need. I dont have a planer and even if I did would probably resaw anyways as planing down to 1/2 in from 4/4 is a loss of a lot of material.

Now the issue. When I resaw a piece of wood now, I get a bevel or hump in almost dead center of the wood and it is noticeable to the naked eye, no need to measure for it. So I have to either plane it down with a block plane (all I have) or sand it down with a hand held sander. Working on getting a belt sander.

Anyways my question is, is there something I am missing, possible table is out of alignment?, or something like that, any help I can get on this would greatly help.

Thank you

- Archer72


Did you expect to get a ready to use piece after resawing without planing it ? If so you were wrong.

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jdh122

952 posts in 2628 days


#3 posted 10-16-2017 03:50 PM

On the bandsaw this is often caused by too much feed pressure, assuming that the blade has enough tension on it (that would be the first thing to check). The problem, though, is that slower feed rates require sharper blades. Using a blade with fewer teeth also helps.
Mathias Wandel has an interesting article on the subject: https://woodgears.ca/bandsaw/resaw.html

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Rich

1854 posts in 400 days


#4 posted 10-16-2017 04:22 PM

There are a number of factors that affect the quality of a resaw. No matter how you do it though, plan on planing it smooth either with a thickness planer or by hand. Even the Resaw King isn’t likely to give you a ready-to-sand surface.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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splintergroup

1626 posts in 1033 days


#5 posted 10-16-2017 04:37 PM

Could your bump be a point where you are altering the feed rate to reposition your hands or something else?

Cutting puts a force on your blade guides thrust bearing which can influence how the blade tracks. When you back off the feed, the dynamics of the blade change which can cause the cut to deviate for a bit before getting back onto its original track.

Careful set up of the blade guides can minimize this effect, but you also should be cutting with a nice, consistent feed.

If your bandsaw is capable of great cuts, a quality carbide toothed blade can do wonders with hard wood resawing. They have the ability to leave very smooth surfaces which will greatly reduce your leveling and sanding efforts.

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Archer72

37 posts in 51 days


#6 posted 10-16-2017 11:36 PM

This is happening on my table saw, ,haven’t really gotten good enough with the band saw to use that yet. I am not expecting a piece not to require some work after a read, but when it is noticeable to the naked eye that it left a,raised portion in the center of the wood makes me think something is off on the saw or how I’m reading it like how fast I feed it or the height of the blade for the first cut. I have been trying to take more passes at it now instead of raising the blade up to cut the most I can in one pass. Hopefully this will help, next I just need to get me a planer.

-- Archer

View Loren's profile

Loren

9547 posts in 3458 days


#7 posted 10-16-2017 11:41 PM

Use a ripping blade for sure. They have
larger gullets which carry more sawdust
out of the cut for deep ripping cuts.

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Rich

1854 posts in 400 days


#8 posted 10-17-2017 12:10 AM

I think you’ll be surprised at how easy it is on the bandsaw once you get some practice. I use the Wood Slicer blades from Highland. I think they perform pretty well for $30. Watch some videos on setting up some form of resaw fence and practice compensating for the drift to stay on your line.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

708 posts in 306 days


#9 posted 10-17-2017 01:40 AM

Is the ‘hump’ you are seeing along the length of the cut? If so, check that your tablesaw blade is square to the table.

I agree with Rich that you should consider resawing on the bandsaw. I built this simple resawing jig in less than an hour and it works very well for me.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2684 posts in 1291 days


#10 posted 10-17-2017 02:10 PM

With either a TS or BS, a good resaw starts with a flat, jointed face against the fence and a 90° edge against the table. Not having this with a TS can be a safety issue.

Use a fence tall enough to register at least 3/4 the width of the board.

Use a high quality, sharp glue line rip blade.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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cracknpop

256 posts in 2159 days


#11 posted 10-18-2017 03:05 AM

If your “bevel or hump” is occurring lengthwise in the center of your board, and you are resawing on a table saw, consider these things;
-is your saw blade perfectly 90 degrees to the top? Off just the slightest will result in a “bevel or hump” in the center.
-is your fence perfectly 90 degrees to the top? Again, even slightly off will result in a “bevel or hump”
-are you tipping the board you are resawing?

You will like resawing on your band saw.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

307 posts in 651 days


#12 posted 10-18-2017 08:13 PM

You truly need a planer. If the bandsaw isn’t tuned correctly, you don’t have enough tension, or you’re using a cheap, dull blade, you are not going to get a dead flat resawn board.

I’d use a Wood Slicer from Highlander Woodworking.

Practice on some scrap wood.

Even a slight wave in your cut will make your thickness so thin that you might as well use the table saw to resaw the board.

-- Dale

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

501 posts in 1395 days


#13 posted 10-18-2017 10:06 PM

Good thread, good info. The bandsaw is the way to go. I practiced on cheap wood, and it does take a certain, “technique”. Actually, i think all the machines in my shop take some personal learning, and still don’t always do what i have in mind.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Sark's profile

Sark

25 posts in 171 days


#14 posted 10-19-2017 12:47 AM

I’m assuming that the piece you are ripping is taller than can be cut in a single pass on the table saw. As mentioned above, both the fence and the saw have to be exactly 90 degrees to the table surface. The taller the piece your’re ripping, the more important the alignment. Also, it’s really helpful to have a feather board or some other device to hold the piece tight to the fence as you push through. That, plus a thin-kerf ripping blade can get you surprisingly smooth rip cuts that shouldn’t take too much extra work to smooth out, either with a planer or sander.

Actually, ripping on the bandsaw has been a failure for me…though I’m inspired to give a try after reading the comments above. Since resawing thick stock isn’t something I do much, the table saw method has worked OK.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19572 posts in 2916 days


#15 posted 10-19-2017 01:59 AM

From what you are saying, you must be cutting halfway through and then flipping it to cut the rest from the other side. If you get a hump, most likely , the blade is not truly square to the table or the edges that are down during the cuts are not square with the flat wide surface of the board. Even when resawing on a bandsaw, it is super important to have a straight square edge of the board down on the table during the cut. That is where the jointer comes in handy!.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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