LumberJocks

Sanding Between Finish Coats..New YouTube

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by CharlesNeil posted 10-15-2017 02:06 PM 1204 views 2 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2113 posts in 3685 days


10-15-2017 02:06 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YD_bdOoRdK4&t=224s

I get so many questions on this, I filmed a video to explain , hope it helps


16 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

26703 posts in 2152 days


#1 posted 10-15-2017 02:09 PM

Thank you for this, definitely an area I need to improve.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

418 posts in 2428 days


#2 posted 10-15-2017 06:03 PM

As always – thanks Charles for sharing your knowledge with all of us.

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19372 posts in 2489 days


#3 posted 10-15-2017 06:22 PM

Thanks Sir Charles.
I always learn something!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View tinnman65's profile

tinnman65

1347 posts in 3228 days


#4 posted 10-15-2017 10:14 PM

Thanks Charles for taking time to share some of your vast finishing knowledge with us.

-- Paul--- Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. — Scott Adams

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3560 posts in 2223 days


#5 posted 10-16-2017 12:05 AM

Great video from someone who knows how to explain it. Learned alot thanks!!!!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1261 posts in 1029 days


#6 posted 10-16-2017 02:38 AM

I appreciate You Tube vids that enhance my knowledge. Thanks for sharing

-- Desert_Woodworker

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

645 posts in 630 days


#7 posted 10-17-2017 12:53 AM

Just watched the video. Yet another highly informative video. I do have a question for anyone who has watched it. Charles recommends 320 and higher grit papers to eliminate nibs. Has anyone tried using a section of brown paper bag for this purpose? I use it as very fine sandpaper and it seems to work well.

View Carloz's profile (online now)

Carloz

872 posts in 406 days


#8 posted 10-17-2017 01:01 AM

You will only remove debris from the surface but will not level the finish imperfections from raised grain etc.


Just watched the video. Yet another highly informative video. I do have a question for anyone who has watched it. Charles recommends 320 and higher grit papers to eliminate nibs. Has anyone tried using a section of brown paper bag for this purpose? I use it as very fine sandpaper and it seems to work well.

- ArtMann


View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1261 posts in 1029 days


#9 posted 10-17-2017 01:33 AM

Art I’ve never heard of this- so I looked into it. I will try it and here is a link

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/brown-paper-bag-trick

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1874 posts in 404 days


#10 posted 10-17-2017 04:37 AM

Thanks for sharing that link, DW. One of my biggest pet peeves on here is when someone says what works for them, and some other person, for whatever reason, says that won’t work. Think about it.

Craft paper, paper bags, burlap — there are many things that will burnish the surface. My favorite product, once I get down to sub-320 grit, is Mirlon Total by Mirka. They are non-woven pads in 320, 1500 and 2500 equivalent abrasive. I like it because it’s a quality product, very consistent, and when I get down to that point in the finishing, I’m interested in something that will follow the surface. I’m beyond flattening it, and the Mirlon pads do that.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2113 posts in 3685 days


#11 posted 10-17-2017 12:34 PM

I agree with Rich . synthetic pads, steel wool, paper bags and so forth , while they will give a better feel , they are mainly for a final rub out .
The issue is they dont really “cut” they ride over a dust nib or dust, they dont really sheer is off , thats why between coats we always sand

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1874 posts in 404 days


#12 posted 10-17-2017 01:48 PM

Charles, if you get a chance, give the Mirlon Total pads a try. They are truly abrasive and cut like sandpaper, yet they are still non-woven pads so they follow any contour, don’t clog and last a really long time.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2113 posts in 3685 days


#13 posted 10-17-2017 02:18 PM

Rich, I do have some and like them , my go to for really fine sanding and so forth are the Abralon, just a personal choice. I can use them on a RAS , wash them out , https://mirka-online.com/abrasives-by-name/abralon.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjw1JbPBRCrARIsAOKj2Pk4idtHUCX6jjmAb0WjIhjEHJD5n0PBqEZLZNrT9nCC37pTkTDeKVAaAux9EALw_wcB
For midcoat sanding I use the sponges from Industrial Abrasives http://www.industrialabrasives.com/blocks-and-pads-rhynosoft-pads-c-80_307.html

I especially like the foam backing , its firm enough to cut flat yet I can fold it to fit profiles .
The Mirlon I often use on Turnings .

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

645 posts in 630 days


#14 posted 10-17-2017 02:26 PM

I use the paper bag technique towards the end of a finishing schedule. A “better feel” is what I am after. Paper bags are free. I will level the finish as needed with 220 to 400 but I don’t use water based finishing products (yet) and raised grain isn’t that much of a problem.

Unlike Charles, I am not an expert. I am just tossing out some of my own observations. I claim they are worth exactly what you paid for them.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1261 posts in 1029 days


#15 posted 10-17-2017 03:16 PM

CN, Art and Rich- The input added to my quest for a “nice” finish…. thanks

-- Desert_Woodworker

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com