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Replacing power switch on Delta Contractor Saw 36-9XX

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Forum topic by Praki posted 1261 days ago 5634 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Praki

196 posts in 2592 days


1261 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

The power switch on my table saw, which was quite temperamental from day 1, finally quit on me. I opened it up and the switch internals were just black and fully corroded. Now for the stupid part of this question! In my haste and overconfidence, I memorized the connections and removed the old switch and put in the new switch and brought out the multimeter to test. To my surprise, one pair of this switch as always closed and I had sort of assumed that it was a two-pole switch. If anybody is curious, here is a picture of this switch.

I have grounded green, connected white to the terminals which are always closed and black to the other pair. I am not quite sure the original wiring was this way. I am probably stressing on this too much, but I would like to make sure that I am not missing anything.

Does anybody know if Delta has a wiring diagram for this switch? Perhaps someone replaced the switch recently and took a picture, unlike me!

Thanks

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker


16 replies so far

View Carl Webster's profile

Carl Webster

82 posts in 1393 days


#1 posted 1261 days ago

Is the saw wired for 240 Volts or 120 Volts?

-- Carl in SC

View Praki's profile

Praki

196 posts in 2592 days


#2 posted 1261 days ago

120 volts

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker

View Carl Webster's profile

Carl Webster

82 posts in 1393 days


#3 posted 1261 days ago

My guess is that this is a single pole switch and the white wire (neutral) is closed always and the black wire (hot)side is the only side that is switched. If the saw was wired for 240 Volts a double pole switch would be the norm with both sides of the switch “switched”.

-- Carl in SC

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14575 posts in 2271 days


#4 posted 1261 days ago

The white is probably connected to operate a pilot light when the saw is on or they use the same wiring harness with a 240 volt when they use a 2 pole switch. Haven’t done it, just guessing.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Praki's profile

Praki

196 posts in 2592 days


#5 posted 1261 days ago

Thanks guys. I guess I will stop stressing about it as the hot side is switched. So, this also means that I need a new switch if I were to wire the motor for 240?

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker

View Stormin's profile

Stormin

192 posts in 1385 days


#6 posted 1261 days ago

Yes just like TopamaxSurvivor said If you wire the motor 240 volt you need a 2 pole switch. Make sure you use a motor rated switch.

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

View Alan S's profile

Alan S

172 posts in 1912 days


#7 posted 1260 days ago

I have to disagree with everyone’s take on this switch. I have the same one on my saw and it is meant to be wired for EITHER 120 or 240 v operation. I had to order this exact replacement switch for my delta contractor saw because the original one had a mind of its own. If one of the pairs on the new switch is connected in both switch positions, I think you’ve got a defective switch. If you are only ever going to be wired for 120, just be sure you wire your new switch so the hot lead is the one that gets disconnected. Otherwise, I’d get a properly operating double pole switch.

Alan

View Praki's profile

Praki

196 posts in 2592 days


#8 posted 1260 days ago

Considering how finicky these switches are, Alan’s theory is starting to make sense to me – I have got a defective switch. It might not be a bad idea to replace the whole switch box with something better. After all ,you do want the saw to stop when you turn the switch off.

Praki

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1839 posts in 2156 days


#9 posted 1260 days ago

I’ve been thinking about this and I agree with Alan. Not a big deal if you never connect it to 240, but could be bad news for a future owner should you sell it and he/she decides to use with 240.

-- Joe

View oluf's profile

oluf

256 posts in 1634 days


#10 posted 1260 days ago

I have a Delta 10” contractors saw 34-444. I went down and checked the switch. It is a DPST switch. The white is connected to one side and the black is connected to the other side. Both sides are open when the switch is off and conduct when the switch is on. The motor on this saw is a one and one half HP, 110/220 volt and is now wired for 110 volt. If I changed the motor connections I would not have to change the wires on the switch. I dont use the switch to turn my saw on or off. I built a magnatic controller with push buttons for start and stop. There is an outlet plug on the side of my controler that the saw cord plugs into. The original saw switch stays in the on position all the time. I am sorry. I went back and looked at the picture of your switch. It is not the same as mine. Mine is a toggle switch, not a rocker switch.

-- Nils, So. Central MI. Wood is honest.Take the effort to understand what it has to tell you before you try to change it.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14575 posts in 2271 days


#11 posted 1260 days ago

deke How does the paddle keep the power off if it goes out?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14575 posts in 2271 days


#12 posted 1260 days ago

Yeah, most motor starters are magnetically held closed. I looked at the paddle switch link, it didn’t say anything about it, so I thought it was a mechanial switch. That is a good idea for any equipment like a table saw.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Praki's profile

Praki

196 posts in 2592 days


#13 posted 1259 days ago

Joe – anybody who buys secondhand machinery should be careful enough to check these things out. But, I will keep it this mind and be sure to mention it.

oluf – thanks for taking the trouble to look. I am going to replace this whole switch with a safer one. Can you provide some details of your magnetic switch? Is it something similar to what Grizzly sells on their website for around $50?

deke – your saw looks exactly like mine – only way cleaner :) I have a paddle switch on my router table that looks similar to what you have on your saw. I might do just that.

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1475 days


#14 posted 1258 days ago

The Switch on my Delta Contractor saw went out and the switch on my Delta drill press went out. I replaced them both with a 30 amp rated single pole switch. Have been running them both with these switches for a while and have had no problems.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View Nick11's profile

Nick11

1 post in 1001 days


#15 posted 1001 days ago

Deke,

So How did you attach that switch to the table saw?

I’m replacing the toggle switch on my Delta 34-444 (3rd one in 10 yrs) and I’m replacing it with a similar switch.

Thanks,
Nick

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