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Forum topic by Cornductor posted 02-07-2011 08:33 AM 972 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cornductor

208 posts in 2127 days


02-07-2011 08:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: maple modern question stains paints danish oil chess

Hey folks I have a question on finishes and paint. I’m building a chess board with one type of wood “maple” and painting in the squares. I then would like to seal it with danish oil from http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com. I’m doing this because I’d like to achieve different colors ie orange, blue, red, etc on the board and just would like to know if it’ll affect the paint.

Thanks
50

-- An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. Benjamin Franklin


8 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#1 posted 02-07-2011 04:06 PM

Danish oil is intended to soak into the wood grain. You definitely don’t want to use it over paint. Lacquer or polyurethane would be a better choice.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3588 days


#2 posted 02-07-2011 04:36 PM

Note: Tried & True “Danish Oil” is completely different than consumer brands of Danish Oil.

The Tried & True product is 100% Polymerized Linseed Oil. It will make an excellent sealer on top of some types of paints. It needs to be applied properly.

Test before committing…

-- 温故知新

View David175's profile

David175

101 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 02-07-2011 04:41 PM

you could use dye insted of paint….just make sure that it dries completly before useing oil

-- Dave..Pensacola Fl.........In GOD we trust

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#4 posted 02-07-2011 05:06 PM

Hobomonk, if you have used this product over paint, then I defer to your experience. But reading this from the company’s website sure would not lead me to believe it should be used that way. In particular I’m referring to the instructions that say to let it penetrate a few minutes before wiping off the excess.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Cornductor

208 posts in 2127 days


#5 posted 02-07-2011 11:48 PM

I think I’ll just stick with a stain and maybe try the paint on some scrap and see what kind of effects I get. Some of this is all trial and error, but we’ll see.

-- An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. Benjamin Franklin

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3588 days


#6 posted 02-08-2011 02:06 AM

Note: Artists have used Linseed Oil, particularly polymerized or stand oil, for centuries as a varnish over their paints.

-- 温故知新

View Steelmum's profile

Steelmum

355 posts in 3423 days


#7 posted 02-08-2011 03:05 AM

I always use varnish as a varnish over my painted pieces. Water based will not add a tint to the paint color. That means your yellows, oranges, etc will stay the color intended. Anything ‘penetrating’ has a chance of making the color run or bleed.

-- Berta in NC

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Cornductor

208 posts in 2127 days


#8 posted 02-18-2011 10:13 PM

I didn’t use paint instead I used water-based stain and it turned out perfect. I’ll post pics soon. Thanks for all the feedback.

-- An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. Benjamin Franklin

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