LumberJocks

Transtint dye on red oak

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Wejr89 posted 10-15-2017 02:48 AM 506 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Wejr89's profile

Wejr89

4 posts in 41 days


10-15-2017 02:48 AM

Im trying to use purple transtint on red oak. Right now im just testing it on scrap. I cut the dye with a 50/50 mix of water and denatured alcohol. I applied it with a rag and foam brush. The trouble im having is getting into the deep pores of the oak. So far ive applied two fairly heavy coats with the same results. Would I have better results spraying it on? Do i need to cut it with only water so it wont dry as fast? Thanks in advance for any help. I dont have a lot of experience with colored finishes.


7 replies so far

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2115 posts in 3686 days


#1 posted 10-15-2017 01:04 PM

Dyes do not “build” like stains, meaning they will be absorbed by the wood while a stain will build up in the deeper grain. Just how it works.
To accent the deeper grain,you need to get a coat of finish on, and then “glaze” using the same dye, meaning the finish will prevent the dye from being readily absorbed, and will allow it to darken the deeper grain.
A better choice is a stain used as a glaze, especially a gel stain.
If you reduce the dye with alcohol it will do better s the alcohol will allow little more bite into the finish, it also will not separate , like a water base , as it doesnt have the surface tension .
Also dyes dry super fast and they dry very dead and dull looking, when wet , is what they will look like when a top coat is applied , so be sure to topcoat to see a true example of what you have

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1397 posts in 1805 days


#2 posted 10-15-2017 03:54 PM

I’ve dyed a lot of red oak with transtint. i can’t recall the specific chemistry reason alcohol/wb won’t fill the pores (ph I think) but here is the solution. The dye mix needs some solids content to bind the dye and the sawdust you will leave on the surface. A diluted wb finish or a clear wb stain base can be used (I use Target WR4000). Sand the bare surface with 320 or finer to generate dust in the pores. apply the dye mix, wipe around, wipe off, let dry. The dust absorbs the color and the binder holds it in the pores. I prefer the WR4000 because it is a water/oil emulsion which provides the benefits of wb and oil, primarily chatoyance, or grain pop. This typically results in the negative grain being a darker shade of the dye color. If more contrast is desired, glazing as Charles mentions will do that. For wb finishes, I use a coat of dewaxed shellac to seal the dye, whether I’m glazing or not. It also adds chatoyance. Not needed for oil/solvent finishes.

View Wejr89's profile

Wejr89

4 posts in 41 days


#3 posted 10-15-2017 08:02 PM

The only thing i can find at my local big box stores is Minwax clear tintable water based stain. Is this any good to mix with the dye?

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1397 posts in 1805 days


#4 posted 10-16-2017 04:03 AM

Bbs should have a few brands of wb finish. MW polycrylic or the mofified poly will do. Thin it about 5 parts water 1 part finish and add the transtint. Test a lot before coloring a project.

View Wejr89's profile

Wejr89

4 posts in 41 days


#5 posted 10-18-2017 05:51 AM

Thanks for the help. My test piece turned out awesome. Hopefully I can get the same results on 7 drums.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

240 posts in 476 days


#6 posted 10-18-2017 11:28 AM



Dyes do not “build” like stains, meaning they will be absorbed by the wood while a stain will build up in the deeper grain. Just how it works.
To accent the deeper grain,you need to get a coat of finish on, and then “glaze” using the same dye, meaning the finish will prevent the dye from being readily absorbed, and will allow it to darken the deeper grain.
A better choice is a stain used as a glaze, especially a gel stain.
If you reduce the dye with alcohol it will do better s the alcohol will allow little more bite into the finish, it also will not separate , like a water base , as it doesnt have the surface tension .
Also dyes dry super fast and they dry very dead and dull looking, when wet , is what they will look like when a top coat is applied , so be sure to topcoat to see a true example of what you have

- CharlesNeil

Charles, when you say to add a finish over the existing dyed surface (such as dewaxed shellec) then to use either the same dye or (better yet) a stain as a glaze, can you elaborate on how this dye or stain glaze should be applied? For example, should it be wipped on and wipped off just like a regular dye or stain?

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2115 posts in 3686 days


#7 posted 10-18-2017 01:02 PM

Sweet tea

Just wipe it on , then off, you may need to let it sit just a bit so it can get a little bite . You can leave as much or as little as you like .
One of my favorite things to do , to “Antique” wood is to hand plane it rough, distress, as I want, a light sand with a RAS and apply a finish , then a quick scuff sand with some 320 , and using a darker gel stain or whatever i have , apply the glaze, , allowing it to hang, in corners and in the nicks and so forth, to basically “dirty it up some
Same thing applies her to accent the deeper grains.”

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com