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Forum topic by harum posted 10-15-2017 12:50 AM 421 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

260 posts in 1483 days


10-15-2017 12:50 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Bought several short T&G flooring boards on a second-hand yard which I haven’t been able to ID. They have serial and lot numbers printed on the back but internet search comes back empty. It looks like some sort of mahogany; has different shades of pink and purple in it, almost like a fresh cut cherry but a more porous grain; feels lighter than cherry. Here are the photos:

Would appreciate comments and suggestions. Best wishes, h.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


11 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#1 posted 10-15-2017 01:19 AM

Alder

100%

Look at the end grain

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#2 posted 10-15-2017 02:40 AM

Palo Verde, but does resemble China Berry. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#3 posted 10-15-2017 02:55 AM

By China berry, he means red alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

618 posts in 748 days


#4 posted 10-15-2017 02:58 AM



By China berry, he means red alder.

- TheFridge

Nailed it!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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harum

260 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 10-15-2017 04:17 AM

Thank you for the responses! Red Alder is a soft, light, non-decay-resistant wood, almost as soft as basswood, would it make good floors? Chinaberry is 1.5x as heavy and 2x as hard as red alder, would be better for floors. What is Palo Verde, a desert shrub? Doubt one can make 1”x6” boards out of it.

These are solid wood flooring T&G boards, 1’-3’ long.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

766 posts in 2923 days


#6 posted 10-15-2017 09:06 AM

Looks like Acacia of some description.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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splintergroup

1705 posts in 1062 days


#7 posted 10-15-2017 02:32 PM

Jatoba

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TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#8 posted 10-15-2017 02:36 PM

My first suggestion would be alder

My second would be to never listen to me.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#9 posted 10-15-2017 04:39 PM



Thank you for the responses! Red Alder is a soft, light, non-decay-resistant wood, almost as soft as basswood, would it make good floors? Chinaberry is 1.5x as heavy and 2x as hard as red alder, would be better for floors. What is Palo Verde, a desert shrub? Doubt one can make 1”x6” boards out of it.

These are solid wood flooring T&G boards, 1 -3 long.
- harum

Ok Harum, that’s a total insult to all the deserts of the world. Shame, Shame, Shame on you. I’ve been say this for years only to myself, “Self, there is as much vegetation living in the desert as there are in forests throughout the world. Granted, the vegetation is a little smaller, shed their leaves several time a year, but that doesn’t make them shrubs.

When a tree can get it’s toes into a water source, they can become monstrous in size. I have seen Mesquites with easily 3’ + diameter trunks. Near the Saguaro National Monument West, there is a Desert Ironwood tree that has to have a trunk 4’ diameter if not a little larger. Most are about 18” when mature. Out on a hill away from any water source except for rain, 10” is the average. That’s the rule for any desert tree.

Just last year, I got a Palo Verde tree that had a trunk somewhere over 24” diameter x 12 tall. I also got the root ball stump that is over 5’ diameter. I have about 7-8 roughed out bowls that are close to 16-17”. If I have the means to collect all the Palo Verde logs I see when they are felled, I would collect every one I see. here is a small sampling as to the character of the Florida species.

Palo Verde wood is hard, but since it’s a desert wood, when cut, it starts it’s drying process and starts cracking immediately. If left on the ground, within 1 years time, it’s pretty much trash because of the bugs that love Palo Verde. Cured properly, it’s probably a good wood. It’s just never been used to my knowledge. I’m done defending the desert forests.


By China berry, he means red alder.

- TheFridge


Thanks Fridge, I forgot about that one…...Jerry a displaced Cajun (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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harum

260 posts in 1483 days


#10 posted 10-15-2017 05:12 PM

Sorry Jerry, my mistake! Of course, Palo Verde is a desert tree, not a shrub. Appreciate your sharing all the info! I’ve also read that Palo Verde doesn’t make a good firewood. Still, don’t see people saying: “Gee! Aren’t deserts supposed to be shrub and sand only! Let’s cut them trees down and make floors out of them.” These boards of the wood in question have nice grain and colors, no cracks. Can one make boards out of Palo Verde?

Could be Jatoba!

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#11 posted 10-15-2017 09:03 PM

Maybe AZ Woody ought to chime in. He lives in a more desolate desert than I do. He also has a sawmill.

I also want to clarify a description of the Palo Verde I mentioned in my above comment. I called it Florida. That of course, is part of it’s name. It’s not pronounced like the state of Florida. It probably sounds more like Flo rrrrr ee da….. ...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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