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Forum topic by Bulkhead posted 10-13-2017 07:44 PM 330 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bulkhead

23 posts in 1373 days


10-13-2017 07:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chair leg repair epoxy caster

Hey All

I have been asked to repair a chair leg. There was a caster and insert in the grain end of the chair leg. At some point the insert and caster came out probably because someone was leaning back in the chair.

Regarding how to repair, I am contemplating an epoxy product but given the number of them from highly viscous two part products to puttys. I don’t know which one I should use. Ideally it needs to bond to the existing wood fiber and be strong enough to handle the pressures from the new caster inserts.

I managed to get a hose clamp around the leg and we’ll use that to apply pressure once I have applied the epoxy.

What would you guys recommend?

Thx


3 replies so far

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cabmaker

1626 posts in 2649 days


#1 posted 10-13-2017 08:09 PM

I think putting a caster on that type chair was a mistake.

I doubt it was originally installed

If you go back with the same type deal…..expect the same result

Appears to be cheaply fabricated ratton

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Bulkhead

23 posts in 1373 days


#2 posted 10-13-2017 09:59 PM

The set is not mine and I was not involved in their selection. Chairs have held up for about 10 years. Personally I’m not a fan of rattan either.

The casters are original and the rest of the set retains them. One way or another that caster is going back on that chair..

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Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#3 posted 10-13-2017 10:05 PM

Rattan can be constrained from splitting
by wrapping the part in wet cane. It stiffens
and shrinks a little (I think) when it dries.

A similar effect can be had with rawhide.

I would use white glue in the split parts and
bind it tightly to dry, then fill the center
section with a dowel and thin wedges of
wood (like a matchstick screw hole repair)
split from a piece of thin wood with a wide
chisel, pound them in there good with plenty
of glue, cut off the excess when dry and re-drill
the hole for the caster.

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