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Does the Ridgid R4512 have an electric blade brake?

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Forum topic by theschubinator posted 10-13-2017 03:48 PM 1870 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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theschubinator

6 posts in 40 days


10-13-2017 03:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: ridgid table saw r4512

I just picked up my first ever table saw. After doing a lot of research I ended on the Ridgid R4512 at Home Depot for my first saw. Many of the reviews talked about the noise the table saw makes when you turn it off and that it was normal because that is the blade brake activating.

However, mine is completely silent. There is no noise, and the blade slowly comes to a stop. It takes about 15ish seconds for the blade to come to a complete stop. It appears that my R4512 either does not have the blade brake, or it is defective and not working properly. Does anyone know if the Ridgid R4512 does in fact have a blade brake, or maybe they removed that from the modern version to save cash like they did by going to 3 casters instead of 4on the mobile wheel base?


17 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4412 posts in 3057 days


#1 posted 10-13-2017 03:53 PM

It would be best to call the company and give them the serial number. That should result in the right information.

View theschubinator's profile

theschubinator

6 posts in 40 days


#2 posted 10-13-2017 03:58 PM

Thanks. I think I need to do that anyways. Three of the four bolts that hold the fence system in aligned came stripped I need to talk to them about as well. The result is the fence is always going out of wack. I’m really debating if it’ll be worth it just to go ahead and upgrade the fence system. I have a felling the current fence is just going to keep causing problems. :-(.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9559 posts in 3462 days


#3 posted 10-13-2017 04:37 PM

I can assure you it does not have a blade brake.

Blade brakes are quite rare on consumer-grade
table saws. I’ve only seen them featured
on expensive saws from Europe and as retrofits.
What you hear (or don’t) hear is a switch closing
inside the motor when the power is turned off.
Some people hear it and assume it is a brake.

Blade brakes are found on some circular saws
though. Because they are brush-type motors
the technology is different and I assume much
cheaper.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

365 posts in 402 days


#4 posted 10-13-2017 05:48 PM

Incra LS-III fence will take your (or any) saw to the next level …

M

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

466 posts in 1283 days


#5 posted 10-13-2017 07:07 PM

There’s some confusion here that needs to be clarified:

Single-phase motors typically have a centrifugal switch which engages or disengages the starting capacitors and windings, and makes an audible click. Because motors are also generators (yes, gross oversimplification, I know), when the start capacitors/windings are brought into the circuit and the motor is freewheeling, there is now electromagnetic load on the motor while it’s running in reverse. The kinetic energy of the spinning shaft and blade now has somewhere to go, more than just friction of the bearings/belts/airflow. This could easily be mistaken for an “electronic brake”, and I suppose it is sort of that, but it’s far different than an “electromagnetic brake motor” that can stop a large amount of inertia in a very short period of time.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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richardchaos

405 posts in 194 days


#6 posted 10-13-2017 08:03 PM

I will pray for you. TAKE IT BACK! And it they are closed THROW it through the window with complete and udder malice!

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5909 posts in 2013 days


#7 posted 10-13-2017 08:11 PM

I will pray for you. TAKE IT BACK! And it they are closed THROW it through the window with complete and udder malice!
- richardchaos

Wonder how long it’s gonna take before they boot you from here again Rich… although, I do admit that some of your previous tirades (as randingrich, garbanzolasvegas, etc…) were occasionally comedic.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2302 posts in 1659 days


#8 posted 10-13-2017 08:15 PM



Thanks. I think I need to do that anyways. Three of the four bolts that hold the fence system in aligned came stripped I need to talk to them about as well. The result is the fence is always going out of wack. I m really debating if it ll be worth it just to go ahead and upgrade the fence system. I have a felling the current fence is just going to keep causing problems. :-(.

- theschubinator


I thought I had a problem with the rail connection on the front, so they sent me a new rail, then the fence seemed off sometimes, they sent me a new one. by the time I realized none of these parts helped the return period was over and I was stuck with it. I became pretty good at aligning the blade to the miter and fence, but they would always go out. The problem is when you raise or lower the blade the back side heels over and the blade goes out of alignment. Sometimes lowering below the height you want then raising the blade can reduce the movement, but it is still there.

If your saw isn’t perfect, bite the bullet and take it back, I have read some people don’t put it back in the box just drive it back in a truck if they can. I wish I had taken it back. I donated it to the restore, then bought a sawstop.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

989 posts in 2663 days


#9 posted 10-13-2017 08:18 PM



Thanks. I think I need to do that anyways. Three of the four bolts that hold the fence system in aligned came stripped I need to talk to them about as well. The result is the fence is always going out of wack.
- theschubinator

Just put it back in the box and go back for another saw, the tool manager should do an RTV on it with no problem. I have an older Ridgid for my uses its been a good saw.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

405 posts in 194 days


#10 posted 10-13-2017 08:39 PM

I have no idea what you are talking about SIR!


I will pray for you. TAKE IT BACK! And it they are closed THROW it through the window with complete and udder malice!
- richardchaos

Wonder how long it s gonna take before they boot you from here again Rich… although, I do admit that some of your previous tirades (as randingrich, garbanzolasvegas, etc…) were occasionally comedic.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

405 posts in 194 days


#11 posted 10-13-2017 08:40 PM

occasionally comedic??


I will pray for you. TAKE IT BACK! And it they are closed THROW it through the window with complete and udder malice!
- richardchaos

Wonder how long it s gonna take before they boot you from here again Rich… although, I do admit that some of your previous tirades (as randingrich, garbanzolasvegas, etc…) were occasionally comedic.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

870 posts in 405 days


#12 posted 10-13-2017 08:42 PM



There s some confusion here that needs to be clarified:

Single-phase motors typically have a centrifugal switch which engages or disengages the starting capacitors and windings, and makes an audible click. Because motors are also generators (yes, gross oversimplification, I know), when the start capacitors/windings are brought into the circuit and the motor is freewheeling, there is now electromagnetic load on the motor while it s running in reverse. The kinetic energy of the spinning shaft and blade now has somewhere to go, more than just friction of the bearings/belts/airflow. This could easily be mistaken for an “electronic brake”, and I suppose it is sort of that, but it s far different than an “electromagnetic brake motor” that can stop a large amount of inertia in a very short period of time.

- William Shelley

That is a legitimate method of induction motor brake. It is called Capacitive Braking.
On the other hand there is no such thing as “electromagnetic brake motor” because all known method to brake induction motors:
AC dynamic Braking
DC injection braking
Capacitive Braking
Regenerative Braking
Reverse Connection Braking

are electromagnetic brakes in principle.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

893 posts in 1375 days


#13 posted 10-13-2017 08:53 PM

Hmm… all my research kept me from buying the Ridgid.

View theschubinator's profile

theschubinator

6 posts in 40 days


#14 posted 10-13-2017 09:07 PM

Thanks everyone for their advice. I think it’ll be a good starter saw for me and my needs. I was just caught off guard when it didn’t seem to have the brake system I heard it had. Guess that’s why you don’t believe everything on the internet :-). I’m def. gonna upgrade the fence though. I heard the Vega Pro 40 was pretty easy to install on this saw. So I went ahead and purchased one from amazon. Hopefully that’ll satisfy me :-)

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theschubinator

6 posts in 40 days


#15 posted 10-13-2017 09:10 PM

I’m stuck to working out of my garage and wanted a smaller one that i could move around. I was originally gonna go with one of those portable Dewalt table saws. So its a much better upgrade over one of those atleast :-).

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