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Metric only measuring tools source in USA

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Forum topic by woodbutcherbynight posted 10-13-2017 03:36 AM 505 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


10-13-2017 03:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: resource question

Anyone have a decent priced source for metric only combination square or maybe a carpenters square. The price here in the states makes me want to take a 1st class trip overseas to go shopping where I can get them for less than $150 a hit.

Thanks for any feedback.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.


16 replies so far

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#1 posted 10-13-2017 03:58 AM

Empire E250M runs around $20.
PEC makes one for around $75.
Another tact might be to buy a new M blade if you have a spare head. Many of the brands are interchangeable, PEC, Starrett, and Mitutoyo, I “think” are interchangeable. I can check tomorrow if Starrett and B&S are.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#2 posted 10-13-2017 04:09 AM

Try Canadian retailers. Lee Valley has some
metric stuff.

Japanese tools are typically metric.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8036 posts in 2417 days


#3 posted 10-13-2017 04:18 AM

https://www.amazon.com/Empire-Level-E250M-Professional-Combination/dp/B001BRDR42

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MJCD

505 posts in 2211 days


#4 posted 10-14-2017 01:35 AM

I use metric, only, for new builds; and continue to use imperial only when I’m working from existing plans. Metric makes sooo much sense, I just don’t understand the fascination we continue to perpetuate with Imperial Scale.

That said, Woodpeckers and Incra are my go-to metric layout tools; Lee Valley has some tools in metric – and I highly recommend each of the three suppliers. They are high-quality tools, and you pay for the quality: “Quality is expensive Once!”. Starrett may have some… I haven’t checked recently – I find their website confusing, so I go where I know.

MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

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woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#5 posted 10-14-2017 01:42 AM

Thanks for the information guys. Very helpful! I had done a brief search last night but it seems I was using the wrong word order, or words to find what I was looking for.

MJCD I agree metric is easier to use. Been working on cars for 27 years and they still mix and match metric to imperial.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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MJCD

505 posts in 2211 days


#6 posted 10-14-2017 03:07 PM

I Throw-out another, personal notation… Imperial.Decimal; rather than Imperial.Fractional.

Whenever I write-up a project build – for consumption outside of my shop – I use Imperial.Decimal, rather than the traditional 1/16th inch notation; that is: 5/8” is expressed as 0.625”; and 3/4” is 0.75”. I find it’s a good mid-point between traditional Imperial and the infrequently-used Metric. Also, when I’m working from existing plans, I usually convert the plans to Metric, prior to starting the build.

Starrett has an excellent Metric Tape Measure that I use for all dimensions larger than my Woodpeckers squares. My other go-to tool is a clear-plastic (acrylic) 18”/460mm ruler.

MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

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Carloz

989 posts in 431 days


#7 posted 10-14-2017 04:26 PM

The fascination with the imperial scale comes from tool manufacturers who would loose money if we were to switch to the metric scale. So they used their influence in the government to fail attempts to catch up with the rest of the world thus keeping the whole country hostage.


I use metric, only, for new builds; and continue to use imperial only when I m working from existing plans. Metric makes sooo much sense, I just don t understand the fascination we continue to perpetuate with Imperial Scale.

- MJCD


View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#8 posted 10-14-2017 11:20 PM


Starrett has an excellent Metric Tape Measure that I use for all dimensions larger than my Woodpeckers squares. My other go-to tool is a clear-plastic (acrylic) 18”/460mm ruler.

MJCD

- MJCD

I ordered two sizes of these. Thanks everyone that commented!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#9 posted 10-15-2017 02:05 AM

I may have found a metric framing square,

https://www.johnsonlevel.com/P/1767/xAluminumFramingSquare

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1179 posts in 1638 days


#10 posted 10-15-2017 02:28 AM

I give the metric system thumbs down. I like the imperial system works perfectly fine for me. We worked hard for our freedom units why would any patriot what to get rid it. :(

-- Aj

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MJCD

505 posts in 2211 days


#11 posted 10-15-2017 01:33 PM

To Each His Own – perhaps, not the first place I would look for a patriotic element – the British invented Imperial (1824); the French codified Metric 25 years earlier (1799). The US Congress authorized the use of Metric in 1866 (150 years ago?). So, I’m not sure where this is un-patriotic.

But, then, I’m just a woodworker, and retired, to boot.

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

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woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#12 posted 10-15-2017 04:26 PM

Maybe we should go back to cubits?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4497 posts in 3083 days


#13 posted 10-15-2017 07:34 PM

Ah! The never ending debate between imperial and metric. No system is best. Whatever works is best. It depends on how mathematically inclined you are. For those who are mathematically challenged, metric is surely the answer, but for those who understand mathematics, either system is equally usable. I was brought up in the imperial system and have absolutely no problem using it during my 73 years of usage. I have also had to use the metric system on special jobs and that was not a problem because being well versed in imperial, made it easy to use metrics. The only downside to the use of metrics for me is the visualization of distances. I can easily identify the size of an object using the imperial, but that same size expressed in metric form requires me to convert imperial to metric.

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woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#14 posted 10-15-2017 08:50 PM

Yes, and many times things I find I wish to make, or buy are in metric measurements. Rather than convert I am doing what I did learning Russian. Use it all the time until I don’t have to convert / translate in my head.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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MJCD

505 posts in 2211 days


#15 posted 10-16-2017 12:28 AM

I agree with Mr. Ron, in that anything over 12” (300mm) is easier for me to visualize and guestimate in Imperial (feet & inches); though, I pull-out the Metric tape measure when I’m doing precise work – regardless of distance (up to some arbitrary length).

It doesn’t matter what you use, as long as you use it consistently, and are comfortable with it.

MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

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