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I still don't like green eggs and ham!..... Bending Plywood???

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Forum topic by richardchaos posted 10-12-2017 07:36 AM 1552 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardchaos

202 posts in 162 days


10-12-2017 07:36 AM

I am interested in making some so called WHIMSICAL or Dr. Suess furniture and have no idea where to start and or consider?

see pic

As one can see the sides are made up of what I think is BENT plywood or other. Laminated?

I think you take I guess 1/4 ply or MDF! RAKE it full of saw relief cuts, take two of them cover them with glue and put them in some sort of homemade press as it were. I have read where some then go back and fill int he relief cuts with BONDO

Does anyone have any experience with this?


17 replies so far

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Loren

9431 posts in 3431 days


#1 posted 10-12-2017 07:48 AM

It’s probably done with 3/8” “Wiggle Wood”
laminated together to make 3/4” sides in a
vacuum bag over a form. Wiggle wood is
plywood with the grain all oriented one
direction so it bends easily.

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richardchaos

202 posts in 162 days


#2 posted 10-12-2017 07:55 AM



It s probably done with 3/8” “Wiggle Wood”
laminated together to make 3/4” sides in a
vacuum bag over a form. Wiggle wood is
plywood with the grain all oriented one
direction so it bends easily.

SO the WIGGLE wood would then simple be made and held in shape by the rear and back framing?

- Loren

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Loren

9431 posts in 3431 days


#3 posted 10-12-2017 08:01 AM

The hard glue lines between the two layers
would fix the shape of the side panels. In
stuff like curved reception desks a wood
frame not unlike a house frame is made and
the wiggle wood nailed to it.

Making a cabinet with 3/8” sides is pretty
flimsy. That’s as thick as I’ve seen the bending
ply available, though I have not bought it
in several years.

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jbay

1736 posts in 682 days


#4 posted 10-12-2017 01:38 PM

Since it’s painted,
The easiest way would be to make a front and back face frame, and rabbet the sides for a pc of 1/4” mdf.
Or 1 or 2 pcs of 3/8 wiggle wood.
You can build up the sides to whatever thickness you want.
1/8” birch ply for tight curves, 3 or 4 layers.
(The strength would come from the 2 face frames)
You would probably have to attach some supports for the shelves.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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Ripper70

489 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 10-12-2017 02:13 PM

Mathias Wandel has a video where he bends and laminates birch ply that might provide some insight as to methodology. As with all MW vids, it’s his ingenuity in problem solving that spares us the frustration of figuring it out on our own.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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DS

2699 posts in 2203 days


#6 posted 10-12-2017 02:47 PM

Wiggle wood is good, or Kerfkore products make this a bit easier.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

2699 posts in 2203 days


#7 posted 10-12-2017 02:55 PM

Then there is Kerfkore AND wigglewood…
It is pretty strong once you have two layers together.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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jbay

1736 posts in 682 days


#8 posted 10-12-2017 03:37 PM

The only problem with kerfcore is 1 the cost, 2 that you have to glue a second piece to it to lock in the curve.

It’s great when you don’t have to see both sides, other wise you might as well use wiggle wood for both layers and save the cost.
Even using just wiggle wood it doesn’t have the best surface to paint so there is still a lot of prep work to get it paintable, that’s why I recommended the 1/8” ply and buildng up, or mdf.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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DS

2699 posts in 2203 days


#9 posted 10-12-2017 03:53 PM

jbay: I don’t disagree with what you have said, however, I will make a couple of points;

  • The KerfKore product shown in my pic is Econokore and is relatively affordable as compared to other offerings. There are also generic versions sold by my Hardwood vendor that are even less expensive.
  • The smooth surface of the Kerfkore is already prepped for paint so that is an added bonus.
  • “Locking in the curve” with two pieces allows the panel to be a freeform structural element rather than a load to be carried by other framework. (I don’t see this as a disadvantage in certain circumstances)

I have, at times, opted for a 3/8” wigglewood core, sandwiched between two 1/8” MDF panels.
This required a bag press and a form to laminate but it turned out very stable.

If not stored properly, some wigglewood will distort a bit (like a pringle’s potato chip). After that, it is rather difficult to use on freeform structures (not nailed to a rigid frame).

Fact is, I alternate between all available materials depending on the specific application.
The cost of materials is factored into the product being offered to the client, so it is not usually an issue.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View jbay's profile

jbay

1736 posts in 682 days


#10 posted 10-12-2017 04:10 PM



jbay: I don t disagree with what you have said, however, I will make a couple of points;

  • The KerfKore product shown in my pic is Econokore and is relatively affordable as compared to other offerings. There are also generic versions sold by my Hardwood vendor that are even less expensive.
  • The smooth surface of the Kerfkore is already prepped for paint so that is an added bonus.
  • “Locking in the curve” with two pieces allows the panel to be a freeform structural element rather than a load to be carried by other framework. (I don t see this as a disadvantage in certain circumstances)

I have, at times, opted for a 3/8” wigglewood core, sandwiched between two 1/8” MDF panels.
This required a bag press and a form to laminate but it turned out very stable.

If not stored properly, some wigglewood will distort a bit (like a pringle s potato chip). After that, it is rather difficult to use on freeform structures (not nailed to a rigid frame).

Fact is, I alternate between all available materials depending on the specific application.
The cost of materials is factored into the product being offered to the client, so it is not usually an issue.

- DS

Sure, I agree. Kerfkore has it’s place for sure.
I’ve used it many times, as well as all the other methods I mentioned.
Basically bringing up factors for the OP to consider.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

312 posts in 1783 days


#11 posted 10-12-2017 04:27 PM

being the cheapskate that I am, I would make the face frames, probably out of poplar, and then glue and screw the cheap luan plywood, the stuff used for the back cheap dressers and such, and screw it that onto the frames. Very similar to jbay’s picture but even simpler and easier. Without the rabbeted sides he suggests you would have the ugly edge of the luan plywood to deal with though. You can use a strip of masking tapes on the corners under the paint to hide the edge, but then we’re diving deep into, I’m too lazy to do it right territory.

-- Ted

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richardchaos

202 posts in 162 days


#12 posted 10-12-2017 05:16 PM

I would like to say I DO NOT like using MDF for the simple reason that it is HEAVY! But to think one could use LOWES quality 1/4 inch pine ply and get any good results is laughable as well.

I am not familiar with any of these WIGGLE woods/products but will look at them. I hate use anything I have to wait for the UPS guy to drop off. And hopefully undamaged!

Yes I think a beefy face and back frame with a rabbit with LUAN sound the most promising for the simple reason of costs.

I read a few things where a guy was using higher quality pine ply with relief cuts in it THEN liberally coating it with automotive BONDO….HUMMM?

ALSO I would like to make both painted and natural versions of this stuff, so we will see

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richardchaos

202 posts in 162 days


#13 posted 10-12-2017 05:30 PM

HUM I think maybe a couple of sheets of Menards 1/8 hardboard Bent and formed! I like the tan colored stuff but hate the dark dark born stuff

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builtinbkyn

1830 posts in 723 days


#14 posted 10-12-2017 05:35 PM

Since the bends are pretty broad and sweeping and the panels somewhat narrow and it will be painted, couldn’t this be done with luan?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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DS

2699 posts in 2203 days


#15 posted 10-12-2017 05:36 PM

Not sure where you are in West Illinois, but here is an outfit that carries bender board, or wiggle wood in 1/8” and 3/8”

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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